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  Previous versions of cgardner's message #11314730 « Issue with eyes. »

  

cgardner
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Re: Issue with eyes.


An asymmetrical lighting pattern on a nose-at-camera symmetrical full face view makes a face seem lopsided. The darker the shadows the greater the imbalance perceived. It is one of many optical illusions seen in portrait lighting.

A skilled portrait photographer can use it to make an asymmetrical face look more balanced by putting the key light on the naturally narrower side then adjusting the lighting ratio / shadow tone by eye until balance between the left and right sides looks "right".

"Short" lighting (45 degrees to the side OF NOSE and 45 degrees above eye line)on an oblique view creates a similar illusion because the brain focuses the most attention on the highlighted front "mask" of the face. It's asymmetry (facial angle hides one side of face) + asymmetry (shadows of lighting pattern hide the other side) = symmetrical looking front of the face.

Here we have a very symmetrical face looking lopsided by a poor choice of pattern and ratio. Centered pattern would look more symmetrical on her face. Lighter shadows would be more flattering and a better match to the body language of the expression inviting eye contact.

Read my tutorials on facial analysis at: http://photo.nova.org

The fact the catchlights are at 9 o clock is is also a reason the eyes don't seem to look "right" copy/paste and rotate each eye separately to put catchlight at 10 o clock and compare.



Jan 31, 2013 at 11:13 PM
cgardner
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Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Issue with eyes.


An asymmetrical lighting pattern on a nose-at-camera symmetrical full face view makes a face seem lopsided. The darker the shadows the greater the imbalance perceived. It is one of many optical illusions seen in portrait lighting.

A skilled portrait photographer can use it to make an asymmetrical face look more balanced by putting the key light on the naturally narrower side then adjusting the lighting ratio / shadow tone by eye until balance between the left and right sides looks "right".

"Short" lighting (45 degrees to the side OF NOSE and 45 degrees above eye line)on an oblique view creates a similar illusion because the brain focuses the most attention on the highlighted front "mask" of the face. It's asymmetry (facial angle hides one side of face) + asymmetry (shadows of lighting pattern hide the other side) = symmetrical looking front of the face.

Here we have a very symmetrical face looking lopsided by a poor choice of pattern and ratio. Centered pattern would look more symmetrical on her face. Lighter shadows would be more flattering and a better match to the body language of the expression inviting eye contact.

The fact the catchlights are at 9 o clock is is also a reason the eyes don't seem to look "right" copy/paste and rotate each eye separately to put catchlight at 10 o clock and compare.



Jan 31, 2013 at 11:12 PM
cgardner
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Issue with eyes.


An asymmetrical lighting pattern on a nose-at-camera symmetrical full face view makes a face seem lopsided. The darker the shadows the greater the imbalance perceived. It is one of many optical illusions seen in portrait lighting.

A skilled portrait photographer can use it to make an asymmetrical face look more balanced by putting the key light on the naturally narrower side then adjusting the lighting ratio / shadow tone by eye until balance between the left and right sides looks "right".

Here we have a very symmetrical face looking lopsided by a poor choice of pattern and ratio. Centered pattern would look more symmetrical on her face. Lighter shadows would be more flattering and a better match to the body language of the expression inviting eye contact.

The fact the catchlights are at 9 o clock is is also a reason the eyes don't seem to look "right" copy/paste and rotate each eye separately to put catchlight at 10 o clock and compare.



Jan 31, 2013 at 10:51 PM



  Previous versions of cgardner's message #11314730 « Issue with eyes. »