Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Alternative Gear & Lenses | Join Upload & Sell

1       2       3              304      
305
       306              639       640       end
  

Post your recent film shots!
  
 
carstenw
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #1 · p.305 #1 · Post your recent film shots!


Whew, I am relieved! I was afraid there might be two buildings in the world like that Nice B&W feel. I guess with film that is still easier


Feb 11, 2013 at 08:01 PM
kaiserkudo
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #2 · p.305 #2 · Post your recent film shots!


Peter Figen wrote:
The first "real" camera I ever used was my dad's Rolleicord. A very underrated camera. Nice feel on those.

A couple of weeks ago, I shot portraits of Howard Heitmeyer, a ninety year old guitar player here in L.A. Feisty old guy, but still plays every day and is sharp as hell. Drug out the RZ for a few at the end. Here's one.


Love the lighting on this portrait Peter. What scanning method are you using to include the border frame of the film?



Feb 12, 2013 at 12:15 AM
redisburning
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #3 · p.305 #3 · Post your recent film shots!


so I accidentally bought a 5 pack of 120 (I wanted 35).

not sure if send back or buy another MF camera.

really tempted by the pentax 67. if KEH does a price discount over the weekend I think Im going to buy one and a 105.



Feb 12, 2013 at 12:58 AM
redisburning
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #4 · p.305 #4 · Post your recent film shots!


Pfiltz wrote:
4x5 Graphic View
Arista EDU film/developer

http://www.keepsakephotography.us/4x5/Liberty.jpg


this is very good.

Id really like to learn how to shoot large format from a talented, experience guy like yourself but I solider on by myself!



Feb 12, 2013 at 12:59 AM
Peter Figen
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.305 #5 · p.305 #5 · Post your recent film shots!


"Love the lighting on this portrait Peter. What scanning method are you using to include the border frame of the film?"

Thank you. The lighting was a simple four light setup - main, two kickers and background. It was scanned on my Howtek HR8000 drum scanner. No problem scanning the entire piece of film there.



Feb 12, 2013 at 02:34 AM
dudemanppl
Online
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.305 #6 · p.305 #6 · Post your recent film shots!


Peter Figen wrote:
The first "real" camera I ever used was my dad's Rolleicord. A very underrated camera. Nice feel on those.

A couple of weeks ago, I shot portraits of Howard Heitmeyer, a ninety year old guitar player here in L.A. Feisty old guy, but still plays every day and is sharp as hell. Drug out the RZ for a few at the end. Here's one.


Man I always envy your scans so much.



Feb 12, 2013 at 06:54 AM
rattymouse
Offline
• • • • •
Account locked
p.305 #7 · p.305 #7 · Post your recent film shots!


Drum scans, right?


Feb 12, 2013 at 07:18 AM
a.RodriguezPix
Offline
• • • •
Account locked
p.305 #8 · p.305 #8 · Post your recent film shots!


Hello, y'all, What would a good low cost, yet high quality medium format starter be, if it's possible to narrow down? I have seen a few decent sounding non digital ones on ebay, like the one from Fuji, and the 645 plethora, however, I am unsure where to start to learn! Thank you!


Feb 12, 2013 at 07:28 AM
Peter Figen
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.305 #9 · p.305 #9 · Post your recent film shots!


"Man I always envy your scans so much."

Thanks for the compliment. Scanning is an art in itself and relies on hardware, software and the interpretation of the operator, so it helps being an experienced photographer doing the scanning. I've spent a lot of time learning that art and it's still fun in a weird way. Before I got my first drum scanner, I used to do what everyone else did - take my film to a lab or service bureau and it wasn't too long until I was going along and supervising to get what I wanted. It's surprising how many people running scanners are just trained how to push buttons and not think about what they're doing.

"Drum scans, right? "

Yes. The Howtek 8000 can scan up to 8000 pip over the entire drum surface, but realistically there are very few films that can support anything over 4000 ppi and even few images that have any meaningful detail beyond that. Unfortunately, the way drum scanners are designed, they have lots of optical hardware resolution settings at the lower end of the scale and far fewer at the high end, and every scanner brand and model is slightly different. The HR800 Howtek has steps that go: 8000, 4000, 2667, 2000, 1600, 1333, 1000, 800, etc. and the vast majority of the time the scans are done at the top three resolutions. Interesting, it makes no difference in scanning time making 8 bit or 16 bit scans, as the scanner always scans 16 bit and it's just a software conversion at the end. It's also much faster to stick to the exact hardware optical resolutions to avoid having the scanning software do the resize. If you ask the scanner for 3000 ppi, it scans at 4000 and then down samples it for you. Okay, enough about drum scanners for now.



Feb 12, 2013 at 08:24 AM
a.RodriguezPix
Offline
• • • •
Account locked
p.305 #10 · p.305 #10 · Post your recent film shots!


Peter Figen wrote:
"Man I always envy your scans so much."

Thanks for the compliment. Scanning is an art in itself and relies on hardware, software and the interpretation of the operator, so it helps being an experienced photographer doing the scanning. I've spent a lot of time learning that art and it's still fun in a weird way. Before I got my first drum scanner, I used to do what everyone else did - take my film to a lab or service bureau and it wasn't too long until I was going along and supervising to get what I wanted. It's surprising
...Show more

Not to sound blunt, or naivete, but how much do the drum scanners cost with operation included? thank you, and it is never enough to read wonderful innovating stories, thank you for your time, and patience! -Americo.Rodriguez



Feb 12, 2013 at 08:41 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Peter Figen
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.305 #11 · p.305 #11 · Post your recent film shots!


Americo - Not blunt or naive but a good question. Drum scanners are not for everyone. There is a big learning curve and they're expensive. Whether or not a drum scanner makes sense for a particular person really depends. And there are only a couple of makers left now - Aztek and ICG. Service is getting expensive.

Most people today are buying used drum scanners off of eBay. The cost of a scanner that is in good condition might be between two and ten thousand dollars, depending on model, location, accessories, software dongles, etc. You need to buy scanning fluid, special tape, mylar overlay material, drum cleaning fluid, cleaning pads, etc. That might run two or three hundred to get set up and that might last a few years.

I know the Howteks better than anything else, and there is precious little maintenance with them. Change the bulb and then drive belt every year or so. They are very very reliable and rarely break, but when they do, it's very expensive to fix. The parts are still priced like you are buying a fifty thousand dollar machine.

When you're actually doing scans, the per scan price in expendable materials is probably less than a dollar a scan, often far less if you're scanning multiple frames on the same drum.

Drum scanning is not for the faint of heart but if you demand the best quality scans and have the time and inclination, it's extremely rewarding.



Feb 12, 2013 at 09:16 AM
carstenw
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #12 · p.305 #12 · Post your recent film shots!


a.RodriguezPix wrote:
Hello, y'all, What would a good low cost, yet high quality medium format starter be, if it's possible to narrow down? I have seen a few decent sounding non digital ones on ebay, like the one from Fuji, and the 645 plethora, however, I am unsure where to start to learn! Thank you!


There are a lot of good ones. What kind of cameras have you liked in the past? Do you want fixed or interchangeable lenses? Reflex or rangefinder? How important is size and shape? Modularity?



Feb 12, 2013 at 09:40 AM
a.RodriguezPix
Offline
• • • •
Account locked
p.305 #13 · p.305 #13 · Post your recent film shots!


carstenw wrote:
There are a lot of good ones. What kind of cameras have you liked in the past? Do you want fixed or interchangeable lenses? Reflex or rangefinder? How important is size and shape? Modularity?


Hello, and thank you! I have and own my Nikon D700. I like portability, but i am not shy to use larger, if it is needed. I like to have a similar functionality as my Nikon, if even possible? I am not shy of manual focus, heck, i actually used mf mainly on my D700, however, AF would be great in this situation, since i think i need to "focus" my attention on the act of capture photo's without the fancy digital camera abilities;spray shooting, multiple exposures; on board photo viewing, and so on! as far as Reflex or rangefinder, or fixed or interchangeable lenses, i prefer interchangeability, but i no not the difference concerning reflex, and rangefinder! Thanks again! -a.RodriguezPix i think the fixed lens Fujifilm GA645Zi is kinda cool tho!



Feb 12, 2013 at 09:48 AM
rattymouse
Offline
• • • • •
Account locked
p.305 #14 · p.305 #14 · Post your recent film shots!


a.RodriguezPix wrote:
Hello, y'all, What would a good low cost, yet high quality medium format starter be, if it's possible to narrow down? I have seen a few decent sounding non digital ones on ebay, like the one from Fuji, and the 645 plethora, however, I am unsure where to start to learn! Thank you!


Low cost and extremely high quality, Fuji GA645, GA645W, or GA645Zi. VERY easy to use and amazing quality. Lenses that are just wonderful to work with.




Feb 12, 2013 at 12:20 PM
carstenw
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #15 · p.305 #15 · Post your recent film shots!


a.RodriguezPix wrote:
Hello, and thank you! I have and own my Nikon D700. I like portability, but i am not shy to use larger, if it is needed. I like to have a similar functionality as my Nikon, if even possible? I am not shy of manual focus, heck, i actually used mf mainly on my D700, however, AF would be great in this situation, since i think i need to "focus" my attention on the act of capture photo's without the fancy digital camera abilities;spray shooting, multiple exposures; on board photo viewing, and so on! as far as Reflex or
...Show more

Heh, did you actually commit to anything there?

AF medium format is going to drive up the price quite a bit. Only the newer systems like the Contax 645, Mamiya AF and later, Rolleiflex 6008 AF, and so on, have autofocus, and the prices for these are all higher. Even then, they generally have just a single central AF point, and take time to focus. It won't be at all like focusing a 135 format DSLR. I would recommend against AF for medium format, unless the price is not an object.

The rangefinder system requires you to align two little images on top of each other, and typically doesn't focus so close, maybe 1m near limit or so. They are much lighter though. The Mamiya 7 or 7 II is the typical suggestion, but it isn't cheap, and some of the lenses are quite expensive. There are also some nice Fuji options here, but often (always?) fixed lens.

I guess apart from rangefinder vs. reflex, one of the first things you should decide is if you want a relatively compact camera (rangefinder or 645), or if size is not a big deal but you want larger negatives (6x6, 6x7), or even larger (6x8, 6x9).

To me, medium format is all about large negatives, so I prefer 6x6 and 6x7 negatives, where there is a lot of choice. 6x8 and 6x9 is much less common, and I am not so keen on the choices there.

If you want interchangeable lens 6x6 or 6x7, then the typical choices are the Hasselblad (maybe a 500 C/M), Mamiya RZ67 or RZ67 II, or Pentax 67 or 67 II (not Pentax 6x7 => no mirror lockup). The Pentax has earth-shattering mirror movement, but a classic SLR shape. The Hasselblad and the RZ have typical medium format modular construction, which can be nice, as you can carry two film backs and switch mid-film, between colour and B&W, or whatever. The Hasselblad is much smaller and really beautiful, but more expensive. The RZ is a great system, but much bulkier, and looks less nicely designed, in case you care. All these systems have some great lenses.



Feb 12, 2013 at 12:47 PM
Pfiltz
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #16 · p.305 #16 · Post your recent film shots!


redisburning wrote:
this is very good.

Id really like to learn how to shoot large format from a talented, experience guy like yourself but I solider on by myself!


Thanks. LF isn't that hard, or at least I didn't find it that difficult.

I just try to use the camera movements to give me something I like while viewing through the GG. When I have it, I lock it down, and shoot. Light metering for me, is the same as I do with Digital. I use a light meter with digi as well as film, so it's easy in that regard.



Feb 12, 2013 at 01:16 PM
alwang
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #17 · p.305 #17 · Post your recent film shots!


a.RodriguezPix wrote:
Hello, and thank you! I have and own my Nikon D700. I like portability, but i am not shy to use larger, if it is needed. I like to have a similar functionality as my Nikon, if even possible? I am not shy of manual focus, heck, i actually used mf mainly on my D700, however, AF would be great in this situation, since i think i need to "focus" my attention on the act of capture photo's without the fancy digital camera abilities;spray shooting, multiple exposures; on board photo viewing, and so on! as far as Reflex or
...Show more

Based on this criteria, I think the Pentax 67 would be the logical fit, since it really is like shooting a slightly larger version of your D700, minus the AF and auto exposure. Also, you can buy into the system quite cheaply if you're patient.

However, I'd keep in mind that one of the fun things about shooting MF film is experimenting with completely different styles of shooting than are available with DSLRs. If you haven't shot square format before, you may find it revelatory. If you haven't shot with a waist-level finder before, it's definitely worth trying. I think rangefinders are also worth considering, but if you're on a budget and are buying used, I find that MF rangefinders require more care to find one in good operating condition.

One other thing to consider is if you prefer to shoot handheld, or if you do most of your work on a tripod. If you handhold, your best bets are either a TLR (Rollei, Yashica, etc.) or a rangefinder (Fuji, Mamiya 6/7, etc.). As far as SLR's, the Pentax (even with it's mirror) and Hasselblad are okay handheld, but the Mamiya RZ is pretty cumbersome.



Feb 12, 2013 at 01:40 PM
rattymouse
Offline
• • • • •
Account locked
p.305 #18 · p.305 #18 · Post your recent film shots!


carstenw wrote:
Heh, did you actually commit to anything there?

AF medium format is going to drive up the price quite a bit. Only the newer systems like the Contax 645, Mamiya AF and later, Rolleiflex 6008 AF, and so on, have autofocus, and the prices for these are all higher. Even then, they generally have just a single central AF point, and take time to focus. It won't be at all like focusing a 135 format DSLR. I would recommend against AF for medium format, unless the price is not an object.


Fujifilm's GA series of medium format cameras are all autofocus and are not expensive at all, except perhaps the zoom model. Those can approach $800 or so. I have a GA645 which cost me $500. The autofocus is quite fast, but the lens is a bit noisy.

Edit: I see the desire is for interchangeable lenses. That excludes the GA series then.



Feb 12, 2013 at 01:43 PM
huddy
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.305 #19 · p.305 #19 · Post your recent film shots!


Americo,
There are lots of good options in the MF film world. I'd start out with something manual focus. I think you will find you change your style of shooting when using film and cameras that are slower to operate than our D700's. I have a Pentax 67 enroute and I'm excited about the potential of big negatives. I had a Mamiya 645 ProTL before making the jump to Pentax. It was a nice camera with some great lenses, and I was able to make some great images with it. FWIW, the Pentax 6x7's occasionally have MLU, as some of them were factory serviced to install that feature. You'd need to look at those on a case by case basis.



Feb 12, 2013 at 03:08 PM
Toni Pukarinen
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.305 #20 · p.305 #20 · Post your recent film shots!



031-04 by Toni Pukarinen, on Flickr

M6, 28mm elmarit-m, Tri-X



Feb 12, 2013 at 07:32 PM
1       2       3              304      
305
       306              639       640       end






FM Forums | Alternative Gear & Lenses | Join Upload & Sell

1       2       3              304      
305
       306              639       640       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password