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Archive 2013 · Sir
  
 
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Sir


The umpire, or, "Sir", for last week's rugby match.

Thoughts and comments appreciated...

Thanks,

Bob




  NIKON D2X    17.0-55.0 mm f/2.8 lens    55mm    f/4.0    1/2500s    400 ISO    0.0 EV  




Feb 23, 2013 at 02:04 AM
Eyeball
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Sir


He might not consider it to be a totally flattering portrait with the tongue but I think it's great. Good impression of concentration/determination.

My only suggestion would be to try an 8x10 crop to move him up and left in the frame.



Feb 23, 2013 at 05:14 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Sir


Eyeball wrote:
He might not consider it to be a totally flattering portrait with the tongue but I think it's great. Good impression of concentration/determination.

My only suggestion would be to try an 8x10 crop to move him up and left in the frame.


Thanks for your comments - I suspect in his youth he was full of mischief, and I imagine still is. A Scot rugger who loves the game and incorporates helpful instruction with officiating - not a push-over tho - awarding 3 yellow cards that match. Teased him about that - reply was a smile and "I have plenty more".

Bob



Feb 24, 2013 at 01:04 PM
 

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RustyBug
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Sir


He does seem a tad low in the frame. The extra space above him doesn't add any significant information for the viewer, so you've got some room to play without losing anything in the process.

Not being a portrait person, I hooked up with a company that shoots college graduation ceremonies and went through their curriculum for shooting grads. It was interesting in several ways to get "behind the scenes", but the "nugget" takeaway was their compositional hint/ROT to imagine a beer can sitting on top of the person's head to gauge how much negative space to use for framing above them.

I realize that shooting grads is a fast paced production model (manual focus only, btw), and doesn't have the other tenets associated with portraiture as it is really event production. But, it is just one of those things that I "tucked away" as a crude barometer for potential consideration. Although portrait shooters may suggest that it is a bit too "canned" ... ... it's a nugget I thought I'd share.


They had a pretty slick interactive training setup with a tethered camera to graduation footage projected to lifesize and you had to position and shoot in "real time". Way more challenging to sustain than one might think.

In case you are wondering, even though I was offered to be part of their team for shooting (my daughter's graduation) the university, I (with reluctant wisdom) passed due to realizing that my arm (post injury) hadn't recovered enough to be up to the task on a reliable professional level / pace for hours of continuous shooting. But you know I was watching them work throughout the ceremony, studying and appreciating their coverage and the things they had shared with me.

PP ... just a tad overstylistic/grained/sharpened in the face for my taste. I think it is mostly due to how it seems incongruous with the rest of the image since the effect appears localized.

Capturing the expression ... seems to be up your alley ... and this one is no exception. His gaze/tongue play well together to present the "realness" of it.



Feb 24, 2013 at 04:28 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Sir


@RustyBug,

Agree a bit too coarse for the approach. Need to reposition and soften a bit.

Thanks for your comments,

Bob



Feb 24, 2013 at 05:30 PM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Sir


To my eyes, placing his eyes fairly centered in the frame gives it the same sort of static composition problem as placing a horizon on the center axis. Less top space and more chest would help by moving the eyes, the center of visual interest, up and off the center line for a more dynamic composition.


Feb 27, 2013 at 01:00 AM





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