Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Lighting & Studio Techniques | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2013 · Background Lighting Question
  
 
GFountain
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Background Lighting Question


I have two recessed pot lights approximately 48" out from my seamless 9' background and about 5' between them. 8' ceiling height. If i picket up a couple Recessed light Extension Socket 13.25 inch (see pic below) and some kind of screw in AC slave strobe would this work to light background? How could I flag such a set up to avoid spill and would the slaves have sufficient power? As key and fill I'm using speedlites.

Any info would be great
Greg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31Qlt1tO72L._SL500_.jpg



Feb 16, 2013 at 12:46 PM
BrianO
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Background Lighting Question


"Sufficient power" depends on many factors, including the ISO setting you use, the aperture you shoot at, the power of your key and fill lights, etc.

The compact A/C slave strobes usually have built-in reflectors, so flagging to avoid spill isn't required. Most have fairly narrow spreads, but there are some that are 180-degrees or more.

As for tirggering, if you use Speedlites in Manual power mode (no preflash), then simple optically-triggered A/C strobes can be tripped in sync with the Speedlites.

Here's one light that would work in the extension device you show:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/878203-REG/Impact_sf_ae56_45W_AC_Master_Slave_Flash.html

Note that these kinds of screw-in strobes are almost always single-power units, so you need to measure the background level and then adjust your other lights accordingly.

Frankly, I can see a number of problems with your idea, including relative difficulty in aiming and placing the lights, power level, etc., but if you want to try it the options are out there, and most aren't terribly expensive.



Feb 16, 2013 at 06:50 PM
GFountain
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Background Lighting Question


"Sufficient power" depends on many factors, including the ISO setting you use, the aperture you shoot at, the power of your key and fill lights, etc.

Thanks Brian. I should have stated sufficient power to render a white seamless "white".

Greg



Feb 16, 2013 at 08:44 PM
alohadave
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Background Lighting Question


GFountain wrote:
"Sufficient power" depends on many factors, including the ISO setting you use, the aperture you shoot at, the power of your key and fill lights, etc.

Thanks Brian. I should have stated sufficient power to render a white seamless "white".

Greg


Give us the specs on the bulbs you are planning on using. Without that information, it's speculation.



Feb 17, 2013 at 12:13 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



BrianO
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Background Lighting Question


GFountain wrote:
Thanks Brian. I should have stated sufficient power to render a white seamless "white".


Understood, and I say again, that will depend on what ISO setting you use, what aperture you shoot at, etc.

It takes more power to make white look white when shooting with ISO 50 at f/22 and a 20-foot light-to-background distance than it does when shooting with ISO 12,800 at f/1.2 at 12 feet, for example.



Feb 17, 2013 at 11:36 PM
GFountain
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Background Lighting Question


BrianO wrote:
Understood, and I say again, that will depend on what ISO setting you use, what aperture you shoot at, etc.

It takes more power to make white look white when shooting with ISO 50 at f/22 and a 20-foot light-to-background distance than it does when shooting with ISO 12,800 at f/1.2 at 12 feet, for example.


Thanks Brian. I understand the variables. I guess the only way to know if this would work is to purchase and experiment.



Feb 18, 2013 at 03:35 AM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Background Lighting Question


If you have two flashes put them on stands where the lights would hang dialed down to similar power and see what the results are without buying anything.

I don't think they will evenly light the background but with foil snoots the low power ceiling fixtures might work nicely as accent / rim lights.

An option for lighting background it tight space is to make V flats and bounce flashes into them.
------------

V...........V

4 -6 of those little slaves inside the Vs on each side should give you even coverage and sufficient power.



Feb 18, 2013 at 12:49 PM





FM Forums | Lighting & Studio Techniques | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password