Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Nikon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2012 · D800 Sensor cleanup
  
 
rankamateur
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · D800 Sensor cleanup


I had 3 big fat whatever's that kept showing up in pics so I'm like hell if I can rebuild a 57 chevy I can clean a sensor. Wrong. I started with visible dust swabs and visible dust plus fluid. Actually used the VD brush first. The first swab was not real bad but left some residue. 2nd swab made more mess. The 3rd left it totally streaked and cloudy. I sent a pic to the Visible dust folks. Oh you need smear away it will clean it right up. I know what your thinking your Eclipse would clean it right up. No it did not. I tried it before the smear away arrived. A couple drops of the smear away and one pass across it and I could tell it was nearly perfect and no streaks however how the hell do you get those little spots where the liquid drys up and leaves a bit of residue. One lesson learned is that people with big shaky fingers should leave the sensor cleaning to someone who knows what they are doing.


Dec 07, 2012 at 09:53 PM
jhinkey
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · D800 Sensor cleanup


I inspect with sensor loop before cleaning to see where the big spots are and any streaks, etc., then try to use anti-static brush - this can introduce more dust if you are not careful. Then if necessary use pre-moistened corner sensor swabs (pre-moistened ones keep you from getting the sensor too wet) to try to get individual areas. if needed I use the full width sensor swabs - usually takes at least two and sometimes three swabs to get it all.

Less is more in sensor cleaning.

I've been extremely happy with the propensity (i.e., lack thereof) of the D800 sensor to collect dust. I also suspect that keeping the mirror bock clean of dust helps too. I also have the sensor cleaning option set for operation when the camera is turned on or off.

John



Dec 07, 2012 at 10:13 PM
tjpenton
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · D800 Sensor cleanup


I find methly hydrate to be the most effective despite the ongoing argument on whether it can damage the filter. If its good enough for nikon its good enough for me.


Dec 07, 2012 at 10:21 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



rankamateur
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · D800 Sensor cleanup


jhinkey wrote:
I inspect with sensor loop before cleaning to see where the big spots are and any streaks, etc., then try to use anti-static brush - this can introduce more dust if you are not careful. Then if necessary use pre-moistened corner sensor swabs (pre-moistened ones keep you from getting the sensor too wet) to try to get individual areas. if needed I use the full width sensor swabs - usually takes at least two and sometimes three swabs to get it all.

Less is more in sensor cleaning.

I've been extremely happy with the propensity (i.e., lack thereof) of the D800 sensor
...Show more
For the most part I think it was pretty clean considering how many times I have switched lenses since I have owned it. I think the spots were oil and were probably on there from the git go.



Dec 07, 2012 at 10:49 PM
jhinkey
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · D800 Sensor cleanup


rankamateur wrote:
For the most part I think it was pretty clean considering how many times I have switched lenses since I have owned it. I think the spots were oil and were probably on there from the git go.


I have been lucky as I've not run into any oil-like spots on either my former D700 or my current D800. So far just dust bunnies for me.



Dec 08, 2012 at 02:52 AM
woos
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · D800 Sensor cleanup


I dunno...I'm an extremely shakey person and I have no problems wet cleaning sensor. It took me a while to get it the first time, but after that it's super easy. ;-)

I find the sensor swabs were a lot more pain in the butt.

What works best imho is the Copper Hill stuff. . . It's a spatula with some lint free pec pads. You tape them on, drip couple drips of eclipse on, then swab.

My method is:

1. Turn on vacuum (has a heppa filter) and stick the vacuum itself as far away as possible, and then secure the hose attachment to my work area with a heavy book. It's set so the hose is constantly providing suction right near the camera's mirror box.

2. Get the copper hill supplies + a blower (giottos rocket blower, or an electric blower). If stuff is really stuck I sometimes use an electric blower that has a dust filter. Also have a flashlight handy.

3. Turn on vacuum. Put into sensor cleaning mode and blow off sensor. Blow it off until I get as much stuff as possible off of it, checking w/flashlight.

4. Swab it, making an across, straight up, across the other way, motion. Toss the pec pad.

5. Examine with flashlight. If it looks clear, put lens on and test. If not, repeat steps.

Once you've got the oil and such off, if you get a piece of dust on the sensor during wet cleaning, don't sweat it! Wait a minute for the eclipse fluid to evaporate then just simply blow the dust off.

I also have one other thing I do sometimes if it's really being annoying and there is a hair or something:

1. Get packing tape roll from cupboard.

2. cut piece and put it inside the camera's mirror box sticky-side-up with it in sensor cleaning mode *making sure not to touch the camera insides with the sticky side*. Blow out the mirror box.

3. Dust and hairs stick to the tape and stop blowing around inside. Yay.

You can also use this procedure to CAREFULLY get hairs out of areas like the auto focus sensor. ;-0




Dec 08, 2012 at 09:11 PM





FM Forums | Nikon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password