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Archive 2012 · Yellowstone Clothing
  
 
sjms
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p.2 #1 · Yellowstone Clothing


oldrattler wrote:
Thank you Henry. My biggest concern there is over dressing and starting to sweat. This is like going to another planet as I live in SW Texas..


you can always remove layers of clothing you have but not having enough to put on can make for a bad day.

Edited on Dec 08, 2012 at 06:53 PM · View previous versions



Nov 26, 2012 at 03:18 PM
oldrattler
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p.2 #2 · Yellowstone Clothing


Celbrett wrote:
chemical heat packs are a good idea for hands and feet. A few tour companies use the site below. You can rent some items rather than have to purchase them.

http://www.necessarygear.com/index.php?cPath=34_308


Thank you. That is a nice site. Jim



Nov 26, 2012 at 05:23 PM
oldrattler
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p.2 #3 · Yellowstone Clothing


sjms wrote:
you can always remove layers of clothing you have but not having enough to put on can make for bad day.


That is a valid point. Thank you. Jim



Nov 26, 2012 at 05:24 PM
lou f
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p.2 #4 · Yellowstone Clothing


oldrattler wrote:
Thanks. Where can I get those tank treads?


http://www.mattracks.com/

;o)



Nov 30, 2012 at 01:16 PM
1MoreFord
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p.2 #5 · Yellowstone Clothing


I can't compare the Under Armour with Duofold but maybe someone else can. This is what I've worn as a hunting base for years. Of course I don't need the best version of Duofold in Arkansas. However, come to think about it though I wore some on vacation in Montana one winter and it wasn't the best version and I kinda over heated while snowmobiling and had to open some layers.

http://www.duofold.com/




Dec 01, 2012 at 04:26 AM
oldrattler
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p.2 #6 · Yellowstone Clothing


lou f wrote:
http://www.mattracks.com/

;o)


WOW, that is great. Thank you, Jim



Dec 01, 2012 at 08:57 PM
oldrattler
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p.2 #7 · Yellowstone Clothing


1MoreFord wrote:
I can't compare the Under Armour with Duofold but maybe someone else can. This is what I've worn as a hunting base for years. Of course I don't need the best version of Duofold in Arkansas. However, come to think about it though I wore some on vacation in Montana one winter and it wasn't the best version and I kinda over heated while snowmobiling and had to open some layers.

http://www.duofold.com/



I'll check them out. Thank you, Jim



Dec 01, 2012 at 08:57 PM
JTMeuret
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p.2 #8 · Yellowstone Clothing


SOREL boots are always great. They last forever too. Built very well.

As in these - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3677199&010=SKU-6287565&003=4239056&camp=CSE:GooglePLA:3677199

Take care and have fun!
-J.T.



Dec 02, 2012 at 06:53 AM
oldrattler
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p.2 #9 · Yellowstone Clothing


JTMeuret wrote:
SOREL boots are always great. They last forever too. Built very well.

As in these - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3677199&010=SKU-6287565&003=4239056&camp=CSE:GooglePLA:3677199

Take care and have fun!
-J.T.


Thanks, J.T. I know I will need something to keep them warm. Jim



Dec 02, 2012 at 04:23 PM
ScatterCrSport
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p.2 #10 · Yellowstone Clothing


I was there in Jan/Feb 2012. 'Be Prepared' for temperatures averaging from +30 to -30 degrees. Staying dry in the High Winter Desert is not usually a problem as long as you don't over heat.

Warm boots with wool knee socks & very light socks underneath to reduce friction & wick moisture away from the skin. I have lightly insulated hunting boots that lace up to just below my knees to keep the elements out.

At the minimum, a union suit with a windproof nylon jacket & ski warm up pants over it sufficed on the warmer days. In cold/windy/nasty weather, an additional layer of Polar Tech Fleece between the union suit and the nylon wind barrier works. My Polar Tech Fleece has leg zippers, so I can put it on without taking my boots off. Likewise with my ski warm up pants.

Camera gear has a way of sucking the heat out of your hands. Isotoner gloves with fingerless wool gloves over them keep my fingers toasty warm. That combination allows me to manipulate my camera controls without taking my gloves off. A warm stocking cap, or even a balaclava with a face mask, wouldn't be a bad idea either.

Even if you're not wearing it, always carry your coldest weather gear with you in a small day pack.

Don't forget to bring Sunglasses! Polarized if you have them.



Dec 19, 2012 at 10:43 PM
 

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Shiva dancing
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p.2 #11 · Yellowstone Clothing


I live 90 miles from Yellowstone, and get out in the backcountry snow shoeing with my camera. We locals believe in layering: a silkweight underlayer beneath your trousers and shirt, then polar fleece and a windshell on top of that, so you can adapt to temperature changes due to weather and exercise level. If cold or in shade, gloves and head cover can become crucial. Layering allows you to dress up or down and stay comfortable and safe with constantly changing conditions. I wear waterproofed Danner hunting boots for hiking in shallow snow; a pair of snow shoes fits over these easily. You might consider cross country ski pants or gaiters if you are hiking seriously. Safe travels and have fun!


Dec 19, 2012 at 10:55 PM
oldrattler
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p.2 #12 · Yellowstone Clothing


ScatterCrSport wrote:
I was there in Jan/Feb 2012. 'Be Prepared' for temperatures averaging from +30 to -30 degrees. Staying dry in the High Winter Desert is not usually a problem as long as you don't over heat.

Warm boots with wool knee socks & very light socks underneath to reduce friction & wick moisture away from the skin. I have lightly insulated hunting boots that lace up to just below my knees to keep the elements out.

At the minimum, a union suit with a windproof nylon jacket & ski warm up pants over it sufficed on the warmer days. In cold/windy/nasty weather,
...Show more

Thank you. This is very helpful. Jim



Dec 20, 2012 at 01:51 AM
oldrattler
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p.2 #13 · Yellowstone Clothing


Shiva dancing wrote:
I live 90 miles from Yellowstone, and get out in the backcountry snow shoeing with my camera. We locals believe in layering: a silkweight underlayer beneath your trousers and shirt, then polar fleece and a windshell on top of that, so you can adapt to temperature changes due to weather and exercise level. If cold or in shade, gloves and head cover can become crucial. Layering allows you to dress up or down and stay comfortable and safe with constantly changing conditions. I wear waterproofed Danner hunting boots for hiking in shallow snow; a pair of snow shoes fits
...Show more

You are a lucky man to live in such a beautiful area. Thank you for the information. Jim



Dec 20, 2012 at 01:52 AM
radioman301
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p.2 #14 · Yellowstone Clothing


Extra socks so if your feet get sweaty your can change out and be warm again. I have found that going from warm to cold and back again insulated overshoes over boots works good. As soon as you go to a warmer place take off the overshoes.


Dec 20, 2012 at 02:26 PM
trenchmonkey
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p.2 #15 · Yellowstone Clothing


My biggest concern there is over dressing and starting to sweat.
Dress in layers, starting with silk or microfiber.



Dec 20, 2012 at 02:40 PM
CAlbertson
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p.2 #16 · Yellowstone Clothing


Thank you Henry. My biggest concern there is over dressing and starting to sweat. This is like going to another planet as I live in SW Texas..

THis is why peole are saying "layers". THe "base layer" is some synthetic long under garnets. They are usual a deep purple for some reason. These stay one all day.

Next I'd use nylon pants and a light fleece shirt. If you are hikeing up hill in snow shoes this may be all you need

But also have the fleece pull over pants a big think pile sweater, with front zip and then vortex shell.

If there is deep snow use gaiters.

A woll ski hat

VERY IMPORTANT: Sun Glasses, good ones made for snow amd sun screen. In fact bring a spare pair of sun glasses and use neck straps

Also a larger pack pack than yo think yu will need. You will be taking off the cloths as you hike and putting them back on when you stop

When you shop for cloths look for ventilation. Under arm zipping in the shell and front zips on the pile seaters. You need to be able to adjust the warmth based on level of physical activity.



Dec 21, 2012 at 04:06 AM
Shiva dancing
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p.2 #17 · Yellowstone Clothing


+10 on polarized sunglasses - Since I fly fish and hike year round in addition to getting out in the snow, I favor the old "glacier glasses" with leather flaps on the side to cut down on glare.


Dec 21, 2012 at 04:14 AM
Imagemaster
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p.2 #18 · Yellowstone Clothing


oldrattler wrote:
Thank you. I will be driving to Mammoth Springs and taking a daily trip via coach, &/or private auto. The standing around will mostly be setting up and working an area.


Since you won't be doing a lot of hiking around, just buy a pair of skidoo boots and put Hotties Toe Warmers in your boots. Also get the Hand Warmers and put them in mittens. You can get the wool mittens that have an opening for sliding your fingers out when using your camera.

I use them when sitting in a blind for hours during freezing weather and they really work.

http://www.costco.com/Little-Hotties-Hand-Warmers-.product.100007329.html



Dec 21, 2012 at 05:04 AM
Paul Mo
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p.2 #19 · Yellowstone Clothing


I have no experience of Yellowstone but come from New Zealand where I used to tramp (hike) and climb. Be careful if you're new to the elements. Frozen landscapes, tundra or alps, are not to be taken too lightly. Make sure you always have a companion.

If there is a local ranger's station tell them, or write a description of, where you are going. Anything more extreme, and locator beacons can usually be hired.



Dec 21, 2012 at 08:20 AM
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