Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2880

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designdog
Registered: Oct 05, 2004
Total Posts: 198
Country: United States

OK, I give up. I freely admit to never using a macro extension.

So I bought a PN-11. Put it on my 105 2.5 AI-s, and put that on the D800. Nice.

Except I could not get any focus. The two little arrows kept blinking on and off, and all I saw was blur. Probably overlooked something simple, right?



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2131
Country: United States

you probably weren't close enough



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 3006
Country: United States

designdog wrote:
OK, I give up. I freely admit to never using a macro extension.

So I bought a PN-11. Put it on my 105 2.5 AI-s, and put that on the D800. Nice.

Except I could not get any focus. The two little arrows kept blinking on and off, and all I saw was blur. Probably overlooked something simple, right?


pburke wrote:
you probably weren't close enough


Yup! Looking at (guessing) around 4" or so.



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 2352
Country: United States

PN-11's about 57mm so it will make you hold the 105 very close to the subject. Extension tubes also reduce the amount of light passing through, so the other possibility is there wasn't enough light to led the little green circle show up and you get the blinking unhelpful arrows instead. But if all you are seeing is blur you may just need to get closer

There may be situations where there isn't enough contrast/light and the circle is elusive. In that case I fall back upon Curtis' rock back and forth until you see something method, just wish my hands were as steady as his

kwoodard wrote:
designdog wrote:
OK, I give up. I freely admit to never using a macro extension.

So I bought a PN-11. Put it on my 105 2.5 AI-s, and put that on the D800. Nice.

Except I could not get any focus. The two little arrows kept blinking on and off, and all I saw was blur. Probably overlooked something simple, right?


pburke wrote:
you probably weren't close enough


Yup! Looking at (guessing) around 4" or so.



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 2352
Country: United States

I have no idea where I left off last weekend, so have to start from Georg's superb Bling and Brass images and Peter (from Madison)'s outstanding vertical industrial panorama and work backwards

Did we hear from Mihai, he was going to have surgery around this week?



designdog
Registered: Oct 05, 2004
Total Posts: 198
Country: United States

You guys are so smart! Of course that was it - moved the distance to subject, and now we are in business!



Lieutenant Z
Registered: Nov 21, 2010
Total Posts: 3019
Country: France

Goerg and Peter, I enjoyed your last b/w.

A few more from Cassis with the 28 :



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 319
Country: Netherlands

Georg, you make bling and brass shine in black&white!



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4043
Country: South Africa

Paul, Georg, Leighton - thanks

Georg - that dandelion is magic - love the symmetry

Ray - that dragonfly is worth 2 eagles! Superb.

Sam - really nice series. Interestingly the Carnegie Foundation set up quite a few libraries in South Africa also.

Doug - good luck with the Noct

Georg - love the "bling" and the tuba player

Phillippe - I loved the harbour at Cassis and wouldn't mind lounging around there now!



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3479
Country: Germany

Philippe, I really love your shooting-style! #1 and #4 look almost surreal, the framing is so special, wow.

Peter, your vertical pano is very, very nice. The light is fantastic and I like the red-filter-look a lot.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3479
Country: Germany

Peter & Peter, Paul, Philippe, Samy, Kevin and John - thanks for your comments! I'm really glad you guys like these images.

Here are 3 more shots from the S-boats, all taken with the 20/3.5 Ais:

German shadows - the lamp-posts are equipped with a special anti-seagull-device ;-)


German ropes - lamp-posts and other stuff make a clean photograph of the S-boats impossible


German trolley - these boats are really cramped inside, I was surprised to see they even had an own trolley to carry provisions



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3479
Country: Germany

And finally (don't wanna flood this wonderful thread) a picture from my hometown, took this today too:

Rostock von georgsfoto auf Flickr
180/2.8 ED at f/4, love this lens



Lieutenant Z
Registered: Nov 21, 2010
Total Posts: 3019
Country: France

thanks Peter and Georg for looking and commenting.

Georg, great set, I especially like the dynamic composition on the "german ropes". Very nice!



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2131
Country: United States

georgms wrote:

Peter, your vertical pano is very, very nice. The light is fantastic and I like the red-filter-look a lot.


thanks Georg. Almost didn't post it because it is so skinny, or won't fit on the screen. Have to do a slightly bigger one. The light was super after a cold front came through and it was late in the day with low humidity. Still like that today and I already have a number of nice shots in the bag. You spotted that red filter treatment pretty well. Experienced B+W converter...

Do you add grain to your b+w images or do you actually shoot Tri-X?



Lieutenant Z
Registered: Nov 21, 2010
Total Posts: 3019
Country: France

another one from the market with 28 2.8



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2131
Country: United States

Philippe - that Ferrari hat is quite the eye magnet, before you start looking at everything else. Lots going on but I keep looking back at that red spot



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3479
Country: Germany

Peter and Philippe - thanks!

Peter, adding grain in SEP2 is a common routine for me - the D3s and D700's files are way to clean for my taste ;-) Btw, I've never shot Tri-X that much back in film-days, it was much more expensive than Ilford HP5plus or the very nice Fuji Neopan 400 over here. Today I really like Tri-X in medium-format-cameras (it's a shame that these fantastic cameras don't see more use).



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2131
Country: United States

I mostly shot T-Max 400 and T-Max 3200, some Tri-X, too, but never got the right touch developing it, I think. Forgot everything about the chemical stuff involved. I think the last black and white print I did was in early 1990.

I do have a large binder full of black and white negatives from those college photo course years I am gradually digitizing, and there is a box of "selenium toned silver gelatin prints" that could be scanned one of these days, too. Plenty of stuff to post here or in another sub forum. It just takes sooo long to clean up these black and white negatives that it may take me another 20 years to get through these.







CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13195
Country: United States

I'd remind those who are experimenting with extension tubes for the first time that it might be worth your while to stop by another thread I started over two years ago with the title Shooting with Tubes. I was introduced to extension tubes on this thread by Laura who demonstrated how they work, though I was a pretty dense student. It really took experimentation to find my way with tubes. In that thread I offer a bit of what I'd learned. Tom Hicks, the moderator of the Macro World forum decided to attach a sticky to that thread which has remained at or near the top of that forum ever since. Over the years a number of regulars on this thread have appeared there, though there is no limitation on camera system. The only requirement is that extension tubes be used when shooting. Extension tubes create a whole new world for a photographer to explore. They are great fun, as we've witnessed on this thread as well since a number of our cyber friends have posted images created with the use of tubes. Here's a shot taken last month with the 105 f/2.5 P AI'd with a PK-13 tube attached.


This was shot at f/8. The focal plane becomes so thin when using tubes that it is generally a good idea to stop down. But you need to keep an eye on your shutter speed when you do that, so often it is better to shoot in manual mode to select the shutter speed you need for that particular focal length. That obviously becomes more important when using tubes with longer glass. Enjoy!



3D.Doug
Registered: Aug 11, 2010
Total Posts: 785
Country: United States

Curtis, your selection of manual focus glass is second to none, wow, that's really great.

I got side tracked today with some errands and a dr appt today. I missed your post until now. Thanks for the encouraging welcome. I'll come around when I can and contribute.

Sorry, I forgot about checking profile, I haven't navigated around in FM to much lately, though I have actually had a membership longer than my join date shows. I was a member under another name, and then couldn't remember my username, lol.

Actually, I may remember it now, I should see if it's still there.

Doug





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