Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2636

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kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4683
Country: United States

The black one is rarer too. I have only seen the silver one. I found it to be decent, but not as good as my slightly larger Series E 50mm. If you want a nice pancake, check out the 50E.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

CGrindahl wrote:
Dean, I'm happy you've been enjoying my work with Silver Efex Pro 2. Initially, I worked with the series of presets listed at the left. Then I began playing a bit with the sliders on the right to see how each affected the preset. I also checked how filters affected the appearance of the image. Then I began working with the original conversion doing essentially the same thing, working with brightness, contrast and structure before reviewing framing options.

When I began working with Photoshop many years ago, I was definitely a "fools rush in where angels fear to tread" sort of guy. I just started playing. Eventually I watched a few videos, but I basically learned by doing. I did the same thing with Lightroom and am now experimenting with SEP. I discovered that it really isn't possible to make mistakes that can't be corrected. Non-destructive processing is a dream. So the best way, in my opinion to find what you like with SEP, is to just begin moving sliders and seeing what you like.

I began playing with the 020 Fine Art Framed option, then reduced contrast slightly, reduced brightness slightly and added structure. Here is a shot I processed this way a moment ago... barbed wire taken yesterday with the 105 f/2.5 P AI'd, wide open.


Great technique - good photo



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

MDoc9523 wrote:
We don't have much graffiti in our little town, so when I saw this I had to take a photo.
D600 35mm 1.4 F/8 1/160



Well taken Ray, even though I loathe graffiti and the vandals who regard it as their right to deface other peoples property.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

FWIW Jeffrey Friedl uses a Voigtlander 125 2.5 with his D4 and gets some amazing results from Kyoto his blog is http://regex.info/blog/



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

georgms wrote:

You can be really happy that Graffiti is rare in your town - it's a major pain over here. Some cities seem to have kinda "artistic" sprayers in their community, this is unfortunately not true for my hometown.



Good pic - pity about the message



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

Mishu01 wrote:
But I've learned to live with this situation, enjoying the good part of this life i.e. photography, family, friends, etc. And yes, I'm optimist regarding the surgery... despite the fact that I developed a real phobia regarding doctors, hospitals, etc


I'll be thinking about you Mihai - hope it all works out OK. We've been missing you here.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

pbraymond wrote:

One more from last Friday, just as I was getting back to the car. 200 AI Micro again.


Another good spot with your trained eye



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

jhinkey wrote:
Never too many pics of your daughter!


+1 - wait for my grandchildren in September!!!



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

jhinkey wrote:
15 minutes with the 45/2.8 AI-P.

This lens is really resonating with me. Small, sharp, and easy to use. I've just been leaving it on my D800 and stuffing it in my laptop case - something I could not really do with the 50/1.8G because it sticks out too much from the camera. I also did not like taking my 50/1.2 AIS around because it also sticks out too much AND it's pretty heavy. The 45P is not fast, but it makes up for it in other ways it seems.

John


Looks like a real keeper John. Tack sharp images all well seen.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

Some Specled Mousebirds grabbing a few rays this morning after quite a chilly night. They are frugivorous and often sit in fairly hot sun which apparently assists in food digestion.



Chris Dees
Registered: Dec 24, 2002
Total Posts: 4905
Country: Netherlands

jhinkey wrote:
15 minutes with the 45/2.8 AI-P.

This lens is really resonating with me. Small, sharp, and easy to use. I've just been leaving it on my D800 and stuffing it in my laptop case - something I could not really do with the 50/1.8G because it sticks out too much from the camera. I also did not like taking my 50/1.2 AIS around because it also sticks out too much AND it's pretty heavy. The 45P is not fast, but it makes up for it in other ways it seems.

John


It's a nice body cap and works quite well if you stop down a little.



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

Oosty wrote:
Some Specled Mousebirds grabbing a few rays this morning after quite a chilly night. They are frugivorous and often sit in fairly hot sun which apparently assists in food digestion.


Lovely pic Peter, they have a great expression, well seen and captured. But what is this "Sun" that you talk of?
Greeting from 6 degrees C.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

MarkdV wrote:
Oosty wrote:
Some Specled Mousebirds grabbing a few rays this morning after quite a chilly night. They are frugivorous and often sit in fairly hot sun which apparently assists in food digestion.


Lovely pic Peter, they have a great expression, well seen and captured. But what is this "Sun" that you talk of?
Greeting from 6 degrees C.


Thanks Mark.

The "sun" is that golden orb in the sky that seemed to have moved away from us after a magnificent summer. It is said that summer only arrives here (34* South) on 10 December but it certainly seems to have leftin a hurry. Last night the temp dropped to 7* and today it's just 16* which is quite cold for our "Autumn".



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

Some more from Lago di Garda.

This set is with the 75-150mm Sereis E.
This lens, like the 28mm f2.8 Series E I have a love-hate relationship with. The lens is very light and feels funny on a heavy FX camera but is much better balanced on the D200. The zoom range is a little funny, 75mm is a nice start but 150mm feels neither here nor there - if it had extended out to 180mm I would have been a little happier but it's still a nice flexible lens. On the DX format the Focal length equivilency is 110 - 225mm and it would make a nice companion witht he 300mm f4.5 in the field.
The operation of the lens is a little funny, you push the zoom away from the camera to get a wider field of view and pull towards you to narrow the view. I sometimes get this wrong and it is an anoyance, more so than it deserves to be. However for a simple lens with a simple optical formula the results are very good. Like the 28mm Series E the colour rendition I find to be quite unique and very pleasing. I am not sure if this is the same on the other ones (Kevin do you find this on your more extensive range of Sereis E lenses?) but I like it on these lenses.
Vignetting is an issue in some circumstances but it is more pleasing than the mechanical looking vignetting on the 50mm f/1.2, although it can still be an irritation depending on subject.

Overall I think this is lens is like that guy you meet occasionally at the pub that seems a really nice guy, but you just can't like as much as he deserves, maybe because he has a really bad haircut or terribly dress sence and although that shouldn't affect anything you just can't bring yourself to go bowling with the guy.

So a bit more about Lago di Garda.
For the Geology nuts out there the lake was created during one of the last ice Ages, carved out by a huge glacier with a particular name (Paliolithic?). It is on the southern end of where the African plate is crashing into the European plate and driving up the Alps (Peter, you are getting closer!) so there are frequent earthquakes in the region. The lake is fed from meltwater but has a 27 year interchange of water so despite the cold water coming into the lake it still maintains a relatively stable and warm temperature.
The south end of the lake opens out into the Lombardian plains and this is why the lake has a regular wind pattern that makes the lake so popular for watersports like Sailing and Windsurfing. The Northern area of the lake used to be a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until WWI when it was awarded to Italy as a part of the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (which was the Austrian version of the more well known Treaty of Versailles).
During the second half of WWII the town of Salo acted the effective capital of Mussolini's Italian Social Republic which earned this area the title of the Republic of Salo until the 25th April 1945 when the totality of Italy was liberated by a major Allied and Partisan uprising.

As mentioned in the last set the region used to be a major lemon growing area, commercially from the C18th to 1924 and it was the furthest North place that Lemons could be grown commercially, giving the location a competitive advantage to get lemons to Northern countries like Germany, Austria & Russia earlier and in better quality than the southern areas, although after the invention of mortorized transportation the situation changed and the lemon industry declined until 1924 when a severe winter destroyed the last of the crops still grown.
These days the economy is based very heavily on tourism especially from Milano and Verona which are both only 90 minutes away (Less if you drive like an Italian).



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12621
Country: United States

WOW! So many great images. It instantly went to Summer here so we're trying to catch up. I've only had time to read the thread and no time to comment. When we finally get caught up I'll be my usual blabbermouth again.

Mihai, I'll pray for a successful operation and speedy recovery.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4683
Country: United States

Mark, I totally agree with the color rendition of the Series E line...I like it. My 28mm is tough to focus and many times I use the rangefinder markings to get what I want in focus (or Live View if I have my tripod). The only time they struggle is in low contrast light. All my images are flat and banal and I end up spending more time in post. If I understand what you are saying, my 80-200 AI focuses and zooms the same. Balance is nice at 200mm, awkward at 80mm. For the price you pay though, not complaining, just an observation.



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

kwoodard wrote:
Mark, I totally agree with the color rendition of the Series E line...I like it. My 28mm is tough to focus and many times I use the rangefinder markings to get what I want in focus (or Live View if I have my tripod). The only time they struggle is in low contrast light. All my images are flat and banal and I end up spending more time in post. If I understand what you are saying, my 80-200 AI focuses and zooms the same. Balance is nice at 200mm, awkward at 80mm. For the price you pay though, not complaining, just an observation.


Thanks for your observations Kevin, I agree with what you say on the flat rendition in some lights, the 3rd photo (of the river) is a good example of terrible flatness although I included the photo to demonstrate what I do find is that the 75-150 gives a beautiful foreground bokeh but not so nice in the background.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4683
Country: United States

MarkdV wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
Mark, I totally agree with the color rendition of the Series E line...I like it. My 28mm is tough to focus and many times I use the rangefinder markings to get what I want in focus (or Live View if I have my tripod). The only time they struggle is in low contrast light. All my images are flat and banal and I end up spending more time in post. If I understand what you are saying, my 80-200 AI focuses and zooms the same. Balance is nice at 200mm, awkward at 80mm. For the price you pay though, not complaining, just an observation.


Thanks for your observations Kevin, I agree with what you say on the flat rendition in some lights, the 3rd photo (of the river) is a good example of terrible flatness although I included the photo to demonstrate what I do find is that the 75-150 gives a beautiful foreground bokeh but not so nice in the background.


I have that same issue with my 80-200, foreground bokeh is nice, background is so-so, depending on aperture. I wouldn't be to worried about it, just find the apertures that aren't so great and avoid them. Granted, it is very dependent on the OOF area being rendered. I have had the opportunity to shoot with the 75-150 and I would gladly trade my 80-200 for it as the range is more in line with where I like to shoot. The extra 50mm at the long end is wasted in my hands...the tube I just got may change that though.

Speaking of the PK13, I reverse mounted my 28mm onto the front of it to see what kind of max magnification I can get with it. I am pretty impressed, 2.6:1. I get a hair over 1.1:1 with the 50mm reversed. Still need to see what I am getting with the lens mounted normally, but I am guessing about 50% of the reversed figures. There is a lot of barrel distortion, very much akin to a mild fisheye lens. Can't wait to try it out on something other than a ruler.

Some informal testing with my 135mm shows real potential. The PK13 cuts the focusing distance about in half. I can fit a 3" subject across the frame... The possibilities make me smile like a loon!



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 8411
Country: United States

Chris Dees wrote:
jhinkey wrote:
15 minutes with the 45/2.8 AI-P.

This lens is really resonating with me. Small, sharp, and easy to use. I've just been leaving it on my D800 and stuffing it in my laptop case - something I could not really do with the 50/1.8G because it sticks out too much from the camera. I also did not like taking my 50/1.2 AIS around because it also sticks out too much AND it's pretty heavy. The 45P is not fast, but it makes up for it in other ways it seems.

John


It's a nice body cap and works quite well if you stop down a little.


Hey - it made Ming Thein's D800E recommended list:

http://blog.mingthein.com/2012/06/30/recommended-lenses-for-the-nikon-d800e/

John



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

Chuong I really like your graffiti shot! A lot more color than mine
John congrats on the new lens. It is very colorful!
Mahia you are in our prayers
Peter I saw with much interest your photo of mousebirds. I have never seen these before and this is an excellent introduction!
Mark I have enjoyed your vacation photos. Such scenery and well captured. The history of this area is wonderful. Thank you for sharing with us



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