Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2625

1       2       3              2625      
2626
       2627              5885       5886       end

asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3287
Country: Brazil

Thanks Jeff, Leighton,
Peter (yes, Thomas has a very nice and resourceful site),
and Reagan (are you speaking on the "mosaic birds" ? , right? If not, Samy deserves the credits on the beautiful birds).
Ray, the beautiful flowers are from Peter!



Jeff, splendid flowers;

Mark, loved the flower isolation;

Rafael, thanks for sharing your excellent test shots and impressions with the 55/1.2;

Samy, great work with the TC-16A;

Reagan, I liked your "points".




CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Love your last set Reagan, especially the first image. I think your brief sojourn with the 50 f/1.2 AI-s solidified your appreciation for bokeh play, which is fully evident in that first shot. The 105 f/2.5 in all its iterations is a great performer when doing that kind of work. Though a tube on and you'll be amazed at when that little lens can do in close. Glad to see you're getting out and about with your D600.



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
It makes sense Leighton, that moving from the D7000, the D600 would work for you. But you also have a long history with Nikon, so you doubtless recall the feel of a full-sized camera. I don't know whether you've shot with the D700 but it is a handful. When I was upgrading from my first DSLR during my Canon days, there was no FX option available. The newest Digital Rebel that replaced the 300D I was using, had a much bigger sensor in a much smaller body. I simply couldn't handle it and so moved to the much more expensive 20D which felt much better in my hand. Next I tried a 1D which I loved, but the full-sized professional camera was too heavy and made the plunge to buy the 5D which has recently been released. I enjoyed that camera a great deal and as you know still owned it when I bought the D700.

Smaller cameras just don't feel comfortable in my hand. I might still have taken the plunge with the D600, keeping my D700, of course, except for the problems reported with that new camera. I know you haven't been troubled by dust or oil and I haven't heard complaints from Ray, so I'm assuming it is not a huge problem. But when I'm lukewarm about moving beyond the D700, such conversation diminishes my enthusiasm. I continue to look at both used D700s and refurbished D600s, but will likely do nothing but keep shooting with what I have.


No oil here so maybe they have addressed the issue with the newer released models.
I can see how a grip might just make the difference in the D600 for some folks. I had a grip with most of my Canon cameras although the one series had it built in. I just got to the point with my small hands I prefer my camera with out the grip.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 8398
Country: United States

deang001 wrote:
Quick question ... those of you who have gone from a D700 to a D800, do you find that the D800 over exposes a lot?

It's driving me a bit crazy actually Seems to happen way, way, way more than it did with my D700.

I have to admit ... in my situation a D800 really didn't give me much over the D700. In many ways I kind of like the D700 better.


It does seem like it exposes a bit on the high side compared to my D700, BUT it also seems like it has more highlight headroom than the D700 did. Even so, I tend to have it set to -0.3 EV at times just to make sure the highlights are not clipped even in RAW when I'm in A mode. If I'm shooting in M-mode it just doesn't matter.

For me I like the D800 because:
- Dual card slots (I use the SD card as overflow from the CF)
- 100% Viewfinder!!!!
- Lack of banding at high ISO and bright point light sources
- f/8 AF capability
- A bit lighter
- Higher DR for same output size
- Greater than 12MP for more cropping potential
- Fewer bad pixels despite having 3x more total pixels

What I didn't like about the D800 compared to the D700:
- 36MP - eating up my hard drives 3x faster! 24MP would have been better.
- Amp glow seems worse at times
- Shadows go blue much more when being pulled up - needs lots of fixing in NX2 or CS6
- Does seem to overexpose a bit a times, though highlight headroom seems better, so maybe this is a wash
- Live view implementation is still sub-par (even after the FW update) compared to D700
- Video - could have done without it to save some cost, weight, etc. . . . my GH-2 is far far better for any kind of video
- Grip is not as secure w/o the higher thumb rest of the D700
- I like the looks of the D700 better

John



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Who knows Ray, the D600 might be comfortable in my hand, which isn't big either, but I've for so long hand a handful that it seems strange to hold a smaller camera. Point and shoot cameras frighten me. Cellphone are impossible. If folks ask me to take a photo with one I decline. I'll try a point and shoot but reluctantly.

As an aside, I checked EXIF data to see how many photos I took during Nikki's visit. Including all shots with all lenses beginning with the photo of the box when it arrived, to the last photo taken a Marin Brewing Company, I shot 2,453 photos. Here is that last shot...



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
It makes sense Leighton, that moving from the D7000, the D600 would work for you. But you also have a long history with Nikon, so you doubtless recall the feel of a full-sized camera. I don't know whether you've shot with the D700 but it is a handful. When I was upgrading from my first DSLR during my Canon days, there was no FX option available. The newest Digital Rebel that replaced the 300D I was using, had a much bigger sensor in a much smaller body. I simply couldn't handle it and so moved to the much more expensive 20D which felt much better in my hand. Next I tried a 1D which I loved, but the full-sized professional camera was too heavy and made the plunge to buy the 5D which has recently been released. I enjoyed that camera a great deal and as you know still owned it when I bought the D700.

Smaller cameras just don't feel comfortable in my hand. I might still have taken the plunge with the D600, keeping my D700, of course, except for the problems reported with that new camera. I know you haven't been troubled by dust or oil and I haven't heard complaints from Ray, so I'm assuming it is not a huge problem. But when I'm lukewarm about moving beyond the D700, such conversation diminishes my enthusiasm. I continue to look at both used D700s and refurbished D600s, but will likely do nothing but keep shooting with what I have.


Yes, I have shot with the D700 and loved the feel of it. But when it came down to the deciding factor of IQ the D600 won out over the D700.

I did have sensor dust/oil, but a wet clean took care of that. I understand now that cameras being sent in to Nikon for cleaning are getting their shutters replaced. This tells me that they have discovered and fixed the problem.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Leighton I know you must be excited to have your market back. Long winter huh?


You better know it! Gonna be in the 70's here this week.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 8398
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:

Smaller cameras just don't feel comfortable in my hand. I might still have taken the plunge with the D600, keeping my D700, of course, except for the problems reported with that new camera. I know you haven't been troubled by dust or oil and I haven't heard complaints from Ray, so I'm assuming it is not a huge problem. But when I'm lukewarm about moving beyond the D700, such conversation diminishes my enthusiasm. I continue to look at both used D700s and refurbished D600s, but will likely do nothing but keep shooting with what I have.


For me, with average hands, etc. smaller cameras feel weird when up to my face, but much better when lugging them around. My FE2 feels so compact and light when it's slung around my shoulder, but really tiny and cramped when up to my face. My Panasonic GH-2 feels the same - great when not being used, but cramped when trying to operate it.

Kind of like a sub-compact car. Feels great in the driveway or parking spot and buzzing around downtown, but not so great when trying to haul people or furniture around. That's when I break out my neighbors pickup truck or our SUV . . .

That's why I'd love for Nikon to produce a DFM3A - same size, etc, but stripped down in capabilities (like no AF motor, no flash, low frame rate, single card, no video, etc. etc.). Yes it would be small, but minimize the buttons so you don't need all that surface area and I think it would be fine. It would be small and perhaps a bit cramped, but it would certainly be a joy to carry around - especially with my new-to-me 45/2.8P . . .



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Who knows Ray, the D600 might be comfortable in my hand, which isn't big either, but I've for so long hand a handful that it seems strange to hold a smaller camera. Point and shoot cameras frighten me. Cellphone are impossible. If folks ask me to take a photo with one I decline. I'll try a point and shoot but reluctantly.

As an aside, I checked EXIF data to see how many photos I took during Nikki's visit. Including all shots with all lenses beginning with the photo of the box when it arrived, to the last photo taken a Marin Brewing Company, I shot 2,453 photos. Here is that last shot...



Oh man my mouth is watering. I'll take a shot of my SIL's first brew attempt when it's refreshment time later today.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:

Smaller cameras just don't feel comfortable in my hand. I might still have taken the plunge with the D600, keeping my D700, of course, except for the problems reported with that new camera. I know you haven't been troubled by dust or oil and I haven't heard complaints from Ray, so I'm assuming it is not a huge problem. But when I'm lukewarm about moving beyond the D700, such conversation diminishes my enthusiasm. I continue to look at both used D700s and refurbished D600s, but will likely do nothing but keep shooting with what I have.

jhinkey wrote:
For me, which average hands, etc. smaller cameras feel weird when up to my face, but much better when lugging them around. My FE2 feels so compact and light when it's slung around my shoulder, but really tiny and cramped when up to my face. My Panasonic GH-2 feels the same - great when not being used, but cramped when trying to operate it.

Kind of like a sub-compact car. Feels great in the driveway or parking spot and buzzing around downtown, but not so great when trying to haul people or furniture around. That's when I break out my neighbors pickup truck or our SUV . . .


I shot with a Panasonic FZ-50 for a few years and never liked how it felt compared to a full-sized DSLR. On the other hand, I LOVED the feel of my old F3.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3287
Country: Brazil

leighton w wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
Who knows Ray, the D600 might be comfortable in my hand, which isn't big either, but I've for so long hand a handful that it seems strange to hold a smaller camera. Point and shoot cameras frighten me. Cellphone are impossible. If folks ask me to take a photo with one I decline. I'll try a point and shoot but reluctantly.

As an aside, I checked EXIF data to see how many photos I took during Nikki's visit. Including all shots with all lenses beginning with the photo of the box when it arrived, to the last photo taken a Marin Brewing Company, I shot 2,453 photos. Here is that last shot...



Oh man my mouth is watering. I'll take a shot of my SIL's first brew attempt when it's refreshment time later today.


+100
This is what I would call "delicious photograph" Well done!



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

Thanks Ronny, Leighton, Dean and Samy.

Samy, Yes, it was a hot chocolate. That hot chocolate alone was worth the trip. It was molten paradise. I had two.

Onto the camera tests. Sorry you will get sick of this mountain. I promise some more interesting pics and a bit of information on the area later but here's a straight out lens test.
Mainly on the trip I was shooting the 35-70mm lens, great, versatile and such quality. To get a bit of extra reach I took the 75-150mm Series E f/3.5 and then I packed the 180mm and the TC201.

Here are 6 shots of a mountain from our camp site (all taken at F/8). The mountain is about 4km (2.5mi) from camp. The shots are with the 35mm at 35 and then 70mm, the 75-150 at 75 then 150mm and then with the 180 without and then with the TC. The 35mm of course is sharp across the frame at both the 35 and 70mm ends. I am amazed at the corner sharpness of this lens.
The 75-150mm is pretty sharp right across the frame at 75mm, a little corner softness and maybe a tickle CA at in the corners at 150mm but at the price it's pretty amazing and the centre of the frame is spot on.
The 180mm on it's own, no guesses that this is so sharp you could cut yourself. The 180 with the TC201 softens a little right across the frame, but even so I think it our-performs the 300 f/4.5 Ai that I own (the non-IF version) I think I will have to do some more tests there.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

You hit half of the grip problem John. On the backside the ridge for holding the thumb is much less pronounced on the D800. But it is the slightly narrower front grip that caused my fingers to cramp. The wider front grip on the D700 allows me to hold the camera without curling my fingers. Here is a screen shot showing the front of the two cameras.


You can see the narrowing of the front grip. That did me in...



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

And the two shots with the 180mm + 100% crops from the corners of each lens.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3287
Country: Brazil

Nice mountain tops Mark and thanks for sharing your impressions on the combos used.


A panoramic view of the Bay of Naples from the mount Vesuvius:

Excuse the size, but the original was almost 7000 pixels at long side:


Bay of Naples from Vesuvius - 2-shots pano- Nikkor 16/3.5 by labecoaves, on Flickr

Soon before reaching the crater border of the Mount Vesuvius I took this picture of the Bay of Naples. Unfortunately there was some haze and air pollution. Herculaneum is near the left border, not far from the sea.

2 horizontal shots pano, no defishing or any kindo of lens "correction".
D7000 + Nikkor 16mm f/3.5 F ai'd had held, ISO 100, f/8 at 1/500s.
As no polarizer was possible in this lens I abused of the "clarity" slider and made some "tonal contrast" to minimize the haze.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

I promised a few more shots of my time with Nikki. I'd wanted to share a few photos of the colorful Victorian homes that are found all over San Francisco. The first image was shot with Nikki, the others with the 24 f/2.8 N.C. AI'd which was called for on narrow streets. San Francisco is noted for its "bay windows that thrust out from the front of a building, whether a single family home or apartment building. I've lived in buildings with this feature and it is quite lovely, especially for viewing up and down a street.




And here is a shot of the first set of Victorians but from farther into Alamo Square so you can see the distant skyline.




asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3287
Country: Brazil

Nice set Curtis. To my eyes both Nikki and the 24/2.8 NC deliver beautiful colours and sharp images!



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

And I need to add a few more cable car photos. San Francisco is famous for its cable cars, so I need to give them their due...





All shot with Nikki, the 85 f/1.8 H.C. AI'd.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
Nice set Curtis. To my eyes both Nikki and the 24/2.8 NC deliver beautiful colours and sharp images!


Thanks Jose. You're right, both of these lenses shine. A kit with the 24, 55, 85 and 105 makes for some fine shooting.

I didn't mention that the first photo is a panorama of three vertical shots put together quite beautifully by CS6.

Also Jose, to mention something I've noted before, backing off on luminance in the blue channel can really help with haze. I have to increase saturation a bit but it seems to be effective. If you didn't try that you might want to experiment a bit and see if it proves useful, as in the wide shot of Naples, which is a stunner, by the way.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

I hesitate to share this image considering the magic of Dean's work in Hong Kong, but the conductor on the cable car insisted I sit on the right side so I'd have a view down Grant Street into the heart of San Francisco's Chinatown. Yes, there has been a vibrant Chinese community here since the Gold Rush in 1849 and this neighborhood continues to attract both tourists for the charm and locals who love the shops and restaurants, but... it is NOT Hong Kong. But, so be it...


This was shot with Nikki. What follows is a shot of the line waiting to board cable cars at Mission at the foot of Powell Street. This was taken with the 55 f/1.2 S.C. AI'd.



1       2       3              2625      
2626
       2627              5885       5886       end