Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2603

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MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
Thanks
Great shots Jose ++ for #2


Very Nice Portraits Ronny!



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
Reagan wrote:
I have been playing with Color Efex 4 in the NIK software package for $126 you can't go wrong
I need to watch the videos though
First one is inside the Chapel where the wedding was and taken with the 25-50 ais
second one is with the 25-50 also
Last one is with the 105

Reagan




Reagan, all set is great, but I liked the most this one; excellent!

I have to agree. Reagan and butterflies Now there's a novelty and nicely framed!



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Some more ice cream...




Nice candids Curtis. She is going to have a hard time eating these without any free hands.



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 4619
Country: United States

Ray,
We also went to Callaway Gardens in Georgia where they have a butterfly habitat
Now I am going to build one for the house my wife says
Since I don't work
It has a little help from Nik's Color Efex 4

Reagan



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

agentbird wrote:

Here are a few shots from Kuala Lumpur with the 45mm PC-E:



D800E.


Very nice series agentbird. I really like how you have created a miniaturization effect with the lens. Nicely done.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
NightOwl Cat wrote:
Yes, resistance is futile, you will end up with one, especially now that you're dabbling in the world of FX

MDoc9523 wrote:
Samy I have enjoyed your safari photos
The 400mm 5.6 AIS is certainly a wonderful lens. Between Curtis, John and yourself I am finding it very hard to resist seeking out a copy for myself - I must resist!



Ray, just a little bit of help to convince you , some samples taken with the 400/5.6 ai EDIF


Southern Lapwing with juvenile by labecoaves, on Flickr
D7000 + 400mm f/5.6 AI EDIF hand held, ISO 500, f/8 at 1/1600s, ~45% crop.
This young has at most 4 or 5 days old.


Lichens and ferns on tree bark by labecoaves, on Flickr
D7000 + Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 AI (narrow tripod collar) EDIF, hand held supported on windowsill. ISO 500, f/8 at 1/160s. The bark was ~8m of distance, ~ 20% cropped.


Very nice Jose. I "long" for one of these 400's as well.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
georgms wrote:
Amazing posts on the last few pages! Will come back later to comment...

Here are a few images from today:


The 20/3.5 Ais (here at f/11 on a D700) can be tricked to create some nice sun-stars...



Fantastic! I liked the "grain" too.


+1 Georg!



David Antilley
Registered: Dec 22, 2006
Total Posts: 313
Country: United States

I tried a different portrait of my dog Daisy. I am still undecided if I like it or not. I really like the focal length of the 35 f1.4.

Oops, I messed up as it's the 85mm.


D800 and 85mm f1.4


DSC_0528.jpg by TXFZ1, on Flickr



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

^^^^^^^
I like it David! The 35mm 1.4 is one of my favorites. Bokeh sometimes has a little character.
That's ok I love my 85mm 1.4 just as well



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 877
Country: United States

One of Nikons best kept secrets(not to this group) The 75-150E amazes me every time I stick it on the camera. Leighton it looks like this one is getting ready to have another kid. I'll try to keep em up this way and not near your crops.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Samy, love the burrowing owl - what a nice portrait of this fascinating bird!

Curtis, good job on the yellow flower (I prefer the first shot)! The Bay-image is great, love the jagged foreground and your framing. In my opinion it would benefit from cropping the upper 1/6 of the sky away, but that's just me ;-)
My personal favorite from your street-set is the gent with the camera above his head - he looks really happy about his subject ;-)

Reagan, the steps in the woods are really nice, and so is the inside of the small chapel.

Jose, I will go through your images from your journey when they are complete (maybe as a slideshow) to get a better feel for your "trip".
Sad to see the work of modern barbarians - there's an unwritten rule among the graffiti-spryers here to stay away from historic sites.
And thanks for reminding us about the abilities of the 400/5.6 ED-IF in such a beautiful manner.

John, I like especially the second portrait, looks like a fun-weekend with the family

Jeff, I prefer the second "Shadow Hills II" over "Mark I" by a large margin - somehow I've felt like I've lost my eyes in the desert of version 1.

agentbird, your work is highly inspiring, thanks for sharing these fine images!

Ronny, excellent stuff as always! I particularly enjoyed the churchgoer (?), the breathing Nitro and for sure your beautiful portraits of your daughter.

David, this lens has for sure some character - love it!



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3289
Country: Brazil

Thanks Samy, Dean, Scott, Peter and Ray for the comments.

Ron, very nice deer.



Two more from Herculaneum.

Partial view of the House of Wattlework (Casa a Graticcio) showing the narrow (one-way) street and modern day Ercolano at the background, some 20 m above Herculaneum streets:


Partial view of the House of Wattlework (Casa a Graticcio) by labecoaves, on Flickr

This house is interesting because of its timber frame construction mostly at the second floor walls.
D7000 + Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 ais CPU'd hand held, ISO 200, f/8 at 1/500s.




Windlass and rope, House of Wattlework - Herculaneum:


Windlass and rope, House of Wattlework - Herculaneum by labecoaves, on Flickr

This wooden windlass with rope was found in the well at the house's courtyard.
It was protected (from weather and today's barbarians...) inside a box with a glass cover.
D7000 + Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 ais CPU'd hand held, ISO 1600, f/4 at 1/80s, ~ 10% cropped.




georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

rankamateur wrote:
One of Nikons best kept secrets(not to this group) The 75-150E amazes me every time I stick it on the camera. Leighton it looks like this one is getting ready to have another kid. I'll try to keep em up this way and not near your crops.


Ron, what a nice example of the quality of Nikon's old Series-E lenses!

Reminds me of a shot taken 8 weeks ago - a roebuck visiting the garden.
At first I've thought he's ill, but later I've figured out he has maybe just his cheeks full with found windfalls:



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 4619
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
georgms wrote:
Amazing posts on the last few pages! Will come back later to comment...

Here are a few images from today:


The 20/3.5 Ais (here at f/11 on a D700) can be tricked to create some nice sun-stars...



Fantastic! I liked the "grain" too.


+1

Reagan



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 4619
Country: United States

Jose, where do you find these creatures I know they are not outside your balcony
Ronny, nice to see your daughter make it to this thread

Thanks, Georg

Reagan



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 3699
Country: United States

Went back to the NEF file for the elephant image and did a very narrow crop to see how the 400 5.6 did at detail level. Ray and Scott, this would be a great addition to your toolkits.

I know I said this before, but after getting the 400 5.6 AIS I got rid of the 70-300VR which had been a standard walkaround birding lens, as well as the 150-500 Sigma, even though I lost AF capability at distance. The sharpness of this lens was just that different from the modern zooms. The new 80-400VR is intriguing, but for a lot more money, more weight and bulkier (77 vs. 72mm filter).







georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Jose, the timber-frame-construction looks familiar - many older houses here are built this way (with a mud/straw-mix between the frames).

Samy, that's a pretty crisp crop - do you shoot from a monopod or tripod or hand-held?



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Thanks for the comments on the earlier posted pictures!
Here's a shot taken just for fun - a bunch of tulips (aging tulips, to be precise ;-):

D700, Ai 55/1.2 wide-open, ISO200, 1/640sec, indoors
There was some nice afternoon-light on the flowers and I've tried to get a dainty, airy look.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3289
Country: Brazil

saph wrote:
...
I know I said this before, but after getting the 400 5.6 AIS I got rid of the 70-300VR which had been a standard walkaround birding lens, as well as the 150-500 Sigma, even though I lost AF capability at distance. The sharpness of this lens was just that different from the modern zooms. The new 80-400VR is intriguing, but for a lot more money, more weight and bulkier (77 vs. 72mm filter).
...


Samy, I would add the horrible focus breathing, some say it is a ~ 260-280mm instead of a 400mm at less than 15m; simply unforgivable for birders!



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3289
Country: Brazil

Thanks Georg; nice tulips with a dreamy effect.

Reagan, for sure those were taken far, far outside my balcony



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