Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2572

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georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3493
Country: Germany

leighton w wrote:
My wife took a photo of our sheep one evening last year. One of our friends who is an outstanding artist saw it on FB and asked if she could make a painting of it. She did and this is the result. She used a combination of paint and different colored strips of magazine paper and clued it to a board. I thinks it's marvelous! The photo was great too.


Leighton, interesting story about this fine picture. I wonder how many (drawing/painting) artists use photographs as a "model". Sometimes I see sketches of scenes for movie-productions and I'm deeply impressed by the pre-visualisation of a scene.
Btw, reproductions like the one from the painting are ideal subjects to work with gray-cards or color-checkers and co.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3493
Country: Germany

MDoc9523 wrote:
What to do on a rainy day? It looks like it is going to rain all day so I grabbed my 55mm 2.8 Micro and headed out on the patio. My plants are enjoying the long steady watering


Ray, beautiful work with the 55/2.8! I especially like the first shot - so many layers of fresh green perfectly framed.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3493
Country: Germany

kings_freak wrote:
In the spirit of Valentine's Day, Ganahl changed their sign this week.
"Love is a game that two can play and both win."

�Tony

...


...knock on wood if that's a timber-dealer ;-)

Tony, love the excellent mix between ambient and artificial lights here. The composition is beautiful as well.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3493
Country: Germany

Scott, love the nightly reflection! The trees in the snow are beautifully done too. The idea to shoot the same subject again is great.

Samy, very nice sets from the General Mitchell Airport and the Airport Museum. The 35/2 OC is a neat lens, I love mine, but I fear my copy is decentered. Have to do some "test-shots" of something boring with many straight lines like modern German architecture to find out ;-)
The Heinkel-project is not forgotten.

Ben, I like your free-line-shots a lot. While I have seen a few before it's always great to see your tension-filled play with light and shadows. Variations of a given theme are fascinating to look at.

Reagan, the 50/1.8+TC14A-combo surely delivers - love the orchid-image! The 50/1.4 SC was my go-to 50mm for some years, it can be temperamental bokeh-wise, but I still love it. Have fun with your copy!

Mark, cute pictures of your son! I'm not brave enough to shoot sled-action with a MF-Nikkor - hat's off to your focusing skills!

Michael, welcome here! I'm a big fan of your work over at other threads (I have a weak spot for good pictures of wooden, traditional fishing vessels like the one's built and photographed in your beautiful country).
I'm afraid to say that in my opinion the best 20mm-lenses made by Nikon are modern Zoom-Nikkors. The later versions of the 20/3.5 Ai/Ais, the 20/4 and the 20/2.8 might work for you if small size and low weight are more important than pure resolving-power.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3493
Country: Germany

Mark, Ray, Tony and Scott - thanks for taking the time to comment on the birches in the sunset.

Tony, I've shot a row of vertical images to stitch them together - these shots showed a good bit of ghosting.
The images taken later in horizontal orientation didn't show ghosting, just flare
My 135/3.5 is a banged up, but coated Ai - from the late 70's.
Here's a stitched pano with clearly visible ghosting:



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

I have some Nikon original lens shades for sale if anyone needs them. $15.00 shipped each. Here's a link that shows what lenses they are for.
http://nikomat.org/lens/hiyoke.html
HN-2
HN-7
HN-22
HN-23
HN-24 also fits the 50-135mm



Mishu01
Registered: Nov 20, 2009
Total Posts: 2390
Country: Romania

leighton w wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
a.RodriguezPix wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
Just had to relay this story from yesterday. Many of you know that I work at a junior college. Recently I moved into the Fine and Applied Arts department (where photography and other arts disciplines are taught). Yesterday, some beginning photography students were out shooting all manually (shutter/aperture/ISO/focus) and were tasked with determining proper exposure using a grey card. They were told to take a shot of a grey card (shooting only JPEG) to figure out what the settings should be for the subsequent shot of their subject. The girls were using a used D60 that didn't come with the manual. They were really struggling and were packing up when I went to run an errand. I stopped and asked if they were shooting the flowers (they are dying, but look very cool, will be shooting them on my break today). They were, but had to follow certain guidelines. They told me the problem that they were having with the camera. On the D60, there is a manual mode, but the girls could not figure out how to adjust aperture since there was only one wheel. I found that you had to press and hold a button next to the shutter (her camera had a ghost image left from where the little aperture logo was). They were very pleased. I gave them a few tips for shooting in that kind of harsh light and they were off. It was nice to give back like so many of you do with relative noobs like me. Thought I would share.



I don't understand gray card to much, so I end up skipping them! I dont get how to take the gray cards picture, does it have to cover the entire photo? would light not reach it then? is it ok to tilt the gray card so that the light source hits it directly? i have used it, and it seems right at times, but i am unsure if it is correctly used? do i use auto, or m mode, does it need to be in focus? thanks for hearing me rant!


Most people say that it is used to get exposure "right"... I say it is used to get exposure close. When I have used it, I have it within the same light as whatever I am shooting, having the card essentially reflecting the light into the lens. I set aperture, shutter, and ISO to get the little light meter centered. If I shoot with these settings, it usually comes out properly exposed, but a little flat. That is why I say its used to get it close.

I made the mistake of going on a shoot as a helper and the 2nd unit forgot their card. I lent them mine and in the crazy that ensued, I never got it back. I need to get another one, its a very useful tool.


This is one reason I shoot RAW. So easy to change white balance in post if need be.


Leighton, the gray card is useful for two distinct situations: (1) to pick the right exposure and (2) to pick the right WB. I believe Kevin is addressing the exposure part.

While shooting RAW can give you flexibility to correct the exposure and WB during PP I still find the gray card very helpful in establishing the proper exposure in situations where you have too much white or two much black in the scene. In such as situations the camera lightmeter is driven to nuts especially in matrix metering.

As a particular observation... correcting exposure in PP is OK in a small amount but when one needs to push the slider for two fstops I personally see that the IQ of the image is suffering in comparison with the same image with a proper exposure. That's why I personally consider that my best images are these with proper exposure and WB - and I mostly shoot only RAW.



a.RodriguezPix
Registered: Oct 31, 2011
Total Posts: 2237
Country: United States


Monster Party by aNikkorGuy, on Flickr



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 7848
Country: United States

And Scott Kelby's Photoshop book and LR book both have a gray/grey card in the back that you can pull out and use. I've yet to do that though, nose has been buried in schoolbooks for forever, it seems, but I'm making progress on getting back in the study and learning modes. Been lurking but haven't shot much in the last six weeks.

Mishu01 wrote:
leighton w wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
a.RodriguezPix wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
Just had to relay this story from yesterday. Many of you know that I work at a junior college. Recently I moved into the Fine and Applied Arts department (where photography and other arts disciplines are taught). Yesterday, some beginning photography students were out shooting all manually (shutter/aperture/ISO/focus) and were tasked with determining proper exposure using a grey card. They were told to take a shot of a grey card (shooting only JPEG) to figure out what the settings should be for the subsequent shot of their subject. The girls were using a used D60 that didn't come with the manual. They were really struggling and were packing up when I went to run an errand. I stopped and asked if they were shooting the flowers (they are dying, but look very cool, will be shooting them on my break today). They were, but had to follow certain guidelines. They told me the problem that they were having with the camera. On the D60, there is a manual mode, but the girls could not figure out how to adjust aperture since there was only one wheel. I found that you had to press and hold a button next to the shutter (her camera had a ghost image left from where the little aperture logo was). They were very pleased. I gave them a few tips for shooting in that kind of harsh light and they were off. It was nice to give back like so many of you do with relative noobs like me. Thought I would share.



I don't understand gray card to much, so I end up skipping them! I dont get how to take the gray cards picture, does it have to cover the entire photo? would light not reach it then? is it ok to tilt the gray card so that the light source hits it directly? i have used it, and it seems right at times, but i am unsure if it is correctly used? do i use auto, or m mode, does it need to be in focus? thanks for hearing me rant!


Most people say that it is used to get exposure "right"... I say it is used to get exposure close. When I have used it, I have it within the same light as whatever I am shooting, having the card essentially reflecting the light into the lens. I set aperture, shutter, and ISO to get the little light meter centered. If I shoot with these settings, it usually comes out properly exposed, but a little flat. That is why I say its used to get it close.

I made the mistake of going on a shoot as a helper and the 2nd unit forgot their card. I lent them mine and in the crazy that ensued, I never got it back. I need to get another one, its a very useful tool.


This is one reason I shoot RAW. So easy to change white balance in post if need be.


Leighton, the gray card is useful for two distinct situations: (1) to pick the right exposure and (2) to pick the right WB. I believe Kevin is addressing the exposure part.

While shooting RAW can give you flexibility to correct the exposure and WB during PP I still find the gray card very helpful in establishing the proper exposure in situations where you have too much white or two much black in the scene. In such as situations the camera lightmeter is driven to nuts especially in matrix metering.

As a particular observation... correcting exposure in PP is OK in a small amount but when one needs to push the slider for two fstops I personally see that the IQ of the image is suffering in comparison with the same image with a proper exposure. That's why I personally consider that my best images are these with proper exposure and WB - and I mostly shoot only RAW.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 3058
Country: United States

Mishu01 wrote:
leighton w wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
a.RodriguezPix wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
Just had to relay this story from yesterday. Many of you know that I work at a junior college. Recently I moved into the Fine and Applied Arts department (where photography and other arts disciplines are taught). Yesterday, some beginning photography students were out shooting all manually (shutter/aperture/ISO/focus) and were tasked with determining proper exposure using a grey card. They were told to take a shot of a grey card (shooting only JPEG) to figure out what the settings should be for the subsequent shot of their subject. The girls were using a used D60 that didn't come with the manual. They were really struggling and were packing up when I went to run an errand. I stopped and asked if they were shooting the flowers (they are dying, but look very cool, will be shooting them on my break today). They were, but had to follow certain guidelines. They told me the problem that they were having with the camera. On the D60, there is a manual mode, but the girls could not figure out how to adjust aperture since there was only one wheel. I found that you had to press and hold a button next to the shutter (her camera had a ghost image left from where the little aperture logo was). They were very pleased. I gave them a few tips for shooting in that kind of harsh light and they were off. It was nice to give back like so many of you do with relative noobs like me. Thought I would share.



I don't understand gray card to much, so I end up skipping them! I dont get how to take the gray cards picture, does it have to cover the entire photo? would light not reach it then? is it ok to tilt the gray card so that the light source hits it directly? i have used it, and it seems right at times, but i am unsure if it is correctly used? do i use auto, or m mode, does it need to be in focus? thanks for hearing me rant!


Most people say that it is used to get exposure "right"... I say it is used to get exposure close. When I have used it, I have it within the same light as whatever I am shooting, having the card essentially reflecting the light into the lens. I set aperture, shutter, and ISO to get the little light meter centered. If I shoot with these settings, it usually comes out properly exposed, but a little flat. That is why I say its used to get it close.

I made the mistake of going on a shoot as a helper and the 2nd unit forgot their card. I lent them mine and in the crazy that ensued, I never got it back. I need to get another one, its a very useful tool.


This is one reason I shoot RAW. So easy to change white balance in post if need be.


Leighton, the gray card is useful for two distinct situations: (1) to pick the right exposure and (2) to pick the right WB. I believe Kevin is addressing the exposure part.

While shooting RAW can give you flexibility to correct the exposure and WB during PP I still find the gray card very helpful in establishing the proper exposure in situations where you have too much white or two much black in the scene. In such as situations the camera lightmeter is driven to nuts especially in matrix metering.

As a particular observation... correcting exposure in PP is OK in a small amount but when one needs to push the slider for two fstops I personally see that the IQ of the image is suffering in comparison with the same image with a proper exposure. That's why I personally consider that my best images are these with proper exposure and WB - and I mostly shoot only RAW.


In my story, I was referring to exposure. I had been in the practice of using one in studio settings for white balance as well.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4047
Country: South Africa

leighton w wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
We've already determined Leighton that you are accumulating posts faster than anyone else on this thread, so no contest. And now that you're convalescing I expect that number will grow even faster. Of course, that is a good thing my friend.

When I twisted my ankle playing softball when I was fifteen, and was put on crutches, I ignored doctor's orders because having been let out of class early I carried the crutches and walked quickly to my girl friend's room and walked her to class before heading to mine. Sadly, what seemed so simple proved not to be, since I've had lifelong tendinitis in my right ankle and pretty constant low level pain. Take good care and FOLLOW your doctor's instructions Leighton.


Yea I know, guilty as charged.

I told the doctor I only had a couple of weeks for this setup, so if it's not better by then, I'll have to live with it. The xrays showed a bone spur on the back of the bone and he said if it got worse he could do surgery. THAT AIN'T GONNA HAPPEN! Around here, if you don't work, you don't eat!


Have you eaten all the lamb nuggets?



michaelwatkins
Registered: Oct 08, 2011
Total Posts: 1703
Country: Canada

Wow, this thread really piles on the posts quickly!

saph wrote:
Michael, one lens to stay away from based on the ghost avoidance requirement would be the 20 3.5UD. My very first look through that lens I saw lots of happy dancing ghosts. Otherwise its a fine lens and of course ghosts work for some people and some scenes.


I don't mind them some of the time but when they show up most of the time ... well, you know.

leighton w wrote:
Judging by your wants/needs I would have to suggest the 20mm f2.8 AI-s as this seems to be the best at distance. The f4 version is well regarded as well. This may help you too. http://www.naturfotograf.com/lens_wide.html


Thank you Leighton. There is a trend in that recommendation I see, which is what I expected too.

jhinkey wrote:
Best sharpness is the 20/2.8 AIS or AF-D, but it does ghost although flare is very very good
Best for flare/ghosting is the 20/3.5 AIS, but as others have noted it's not the sharpest for distant subjects (but very sharp up close).

My best 20/2.8 is actually my 17-35/2.8 AFS set at 20mm - it's better in all regards than the 20/2.8AIS or D regarding sharpness, flare, and ghosting, but it's heavy, large, and much more expensive (like $1K) and it's not a MF Nikkor . . .


Re the 17-25, the large and heavy aspect is more of an issue than cost. How is the 17-35 when used at 35? That's a focal length I use on FX more than any other; I could see myself drifting between 28 and 35 most of the time, although I already own a very good 35.

Hmnn... must... think... more.



digitalthump
Registered: May 29, 2009
Total Posts: 202
Country: United States

First I would like to thank every for their warm welcome to this thread, I see that keeping up with all the images and post will keep me busy!!

I'm enjoying all the fine images that are shared here, keep it up! A couple new lens have arrived;200f4 AIS, 300mm F4 Ai(this thing is tank), and three on the way, 50mmf2 aid, 50mm1.4 AIS, and the 55mm3.5 AI. Hope to be sharing more images soon. Have a question, can these lenses be used in Shutter priority? Doesn't appear to work on my D800. Craig



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 768
Country: Poland

Kevin, great that you could take some time out to help others learn this craft.

With regards to the grey card, for exposure I read in a couple of books (don't ask me which ones - I don't remember) that you don't need a grey card, you can just use your hand to the same effect since it is also a neutral colour as far as the camera is concerned. Anyone try this and know if it is try / untrue?

Kind regards,
Mark.


P.S. Laura, good to hear the study's making progress. Your shot of your test the other day made me go back to my old chemistry notes just to see if I still could remember anything they spent years drumming into me (Answer was very little).

P.P.S. Stunning piece of artwork Leighton, thanks for sharing.


NightOwl Cat wrote:
And Scott Kelby's Photoshop book and LR book both have a gray/grey card in the back that you can pull out and use. I've yet to do that though, nose has been buried in schoolbooks for forever, it seems, but I'm making progress on getting back in the study and learning modes. Been lurking but haven't shot much in the last six weeks.



a.RodriguezPix
Registered: Oct 31, 2011
Total Posts: 2237
Country: United States

A handheld photo, using my Nikon D700 plus the Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 AIS, and finally mutilating it in lightroom 4.



a Americo.Rodriguez photo-9 by aNikkorGuy, on Flickr






a Americo.Rodriguez photo-8 by aNikkorGuy, on Flickr







Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3117
Country: United States

digitalthump wrote:
First I would like to thank every for their warm welcome to this thread, I see that keeping up with all the images and post will keep me busy!!

I'm enjoying all the fine images that are shared here, keep it up! A couple new lens have arrived;200f4 AIS, 300mm F4 Ai(this thing is tank), and three on the way, 50mmf2 aid, 50mm1.4 AIS, and the 55mm3.5 AI. Hope to be sharing more images soon. Have a question, can these lenses be used in Shutter priority? Doesn't appear to work on my D800. Craig



Craig, They can only be used in aperture and manual mode and you can also change the command wheel to let you use the aperture ring on the lens instead of the wheel

Reagan



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9619
Country: United States

kwoodard wrote:
Just had to relay this story from yesterday. Many of you know that I work at a junior college. Recently I moved into the Fine and Applied Arts department (where photography and other arts disciplines are taught). Yesterday, some beginning photography students were out shooting all manually (shutter/aperture/ISO/focus) and were tasked with determining proper exposure using a grey card. They were told to take a shot of a grey card (shooting only JPEG) to figure out what the settings should be for the subsequent shot of their subject. The girls were using a used D60 that didn't come with the manual. They were really struggling and were packing up when I went to run an errand. I stopped and asked if they were shooting the flowers (they are dying, but look very cool, will be shooting them on my break today). They were, but had to follow certain guidelines. They told me the problem that they were having with the camera. On the D60, there is a manual mode, but the girls could not figure out how to adjust aperture since there was only one wheel. I found that you had to press and hold a button next to the shutter (her camera had a ghost image left from where the little aperture logo was). They were very pleased. I gave them a few tips for shooting in that kind of harsh light and they were off. It was nice to give back like so many of you do with relative noobs like me. Thought I would share.

a.RodriguezPix wrote:
I don't understand gray card to much, so I end up skipping them! I dont get how to take the gray cards picture, does it have to cover the entire photo? would light not reach it then? is it ok to tilt the gray card so that the light source hits it directly? i have used it, and it seems right at times, but i am unsure if it is correctly used? do i use auto, or m mode, does it need to be in focus? thanks for hearing me rant!

kwoodard wrote:
Most people say that it is used to get exposure "right"... I say it is used to get exposure close. When I have used it, I have it within the same light as whatever I am shooting, having the card essentially reflecting the light into the lens. I set aperture, shutter, and ISO to get the little light meter centered. If I shoot with these settings, it usually comes out properly exposed, but a little flat. That is why I say its used to get it close.

I made the mistake of going on a shoot as a helper and the 2nd unit forgot their card. I lent them mine and in the crazy that ensued, I never got it back. I need to get another one, its a very useful tool.

leighton w wrote:
This is one reason I shoot RAW. So easy to change white balance in post if need be.

Mishu01 wrote:
Leighton, the gray card is useful for two distinct situations: (1) to pick the right exposure and (2) to pick the right WB. I believe Kevin is addressing the exposure part.

While shooting RAW can give you flexibility to correct the exposure and WB during PP I still find the gray card very helpful in establishing the proper exposure in situations where you have too much white or two much black in the scene. In such as situations the camera lightmeter is driven to nuts especially in matrix metering.

As a particular observation... correcting exposure in PP is OK in a small amount but when one needs to push the slider for two fstops I personally see that the IQ of the image is suffering in comparison with the same image with a proper exposure. That's why I personally consider that my best images are these with proper exposure and WB - and I mostly shoot only RAW.


Mihai, you and Georg are indeed correct. The card is useful for not only white balance but exposure. And as Georg says, it is the most useful in a studio situation. He's also correct in saying that white balance is more of a personal taste thing.

The only thing I have about using the card over doing it in LR is the hassle factor. I guess I've gotten spoiled by using the eyedropper in LR. And even after that I sometimes find myself tweaking it one way or the other.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9619
Country: United States

Oosty wrote:
leighton w wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
We've already determined Leighton that you are accumulating posts faster than anyone else on this thread, so no contest. And now that you're convalescing I expect that number will grow even faster. Of course, that is a good thing my friend.

When I twisted my ankle playing softball when I was fifteen, and was put on crutches, I ignored doctor's orders because having been let out of class early I carried the crutches and walked quickly to my girl friend's room and walked her to class before heading to mine. Sadly, what seemed so simple proved not to be, since I've had lifelong tendinitis in my right ankle and pretty constant low level pain. Take good care and FOLLOW your doctor's instructions Leighton.


Yea I know, guilty as charged.

I told the doctor I only had a couple of weeks for this setup, so if it's not better by then, I'll have to live with it. The xrays showed a bone spur on the back of the bone and he said if it got worse he could do surgery. THAT AIN'T GONNA HAPPEN! Around here, if you don't work, you don't eat!


Have you eaten all the lamb nuggets?


Nah, plenty of those left. Not only that, but we have 28 more of them running around the farm!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9619
Country: United States

digitalthump wrote:
First I would like to thank every for their warm welcome to this thread, I see that keeping up with all the images and post will keep me busy!!

I'm enjoying all the fine images that are shared here, keep it up! A couple new lens have arrived;200f4 AIS, 300mm F4 Ai(this thing is tank), and three on the way, 50mmf2 aid, 50mm1.4 AIS, and the 55mm3.5 AI. Hope to be sharing more images soon. Have a question, can these lenses be used in Shutter priority? Doesn't appear to work on my D800. Craig

Reagan wrote:
Craig, They can only be used in aperture and manual mode and you can also change the command wheel to let you use the aperture ring on the lens instead of the wheel

Reagan


Craig, Reagan is right, you can only use them aperture and manual mode. But I'm not sure what he's talking about with the command dial.

Help us out Reagan.



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3117
Country: United States

F5 in the custom menu lets you change setting the aperture from the command wheel to the aperture ring on the lens
I use the rear wheel for the shutter speed and I change the aperture with the ring on the lens This also works with AF lens if they have an aperture ring

Reagan


It is F5 on the D600 F9 on the D700



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