Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2524

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Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

bruni wrote:

Peter - I expected the US members to flame me over my accent crack - but you? YOU?

Ben


Ah Ben - you know it's just a friendly dig! What would life be if if us southern hemispherians couldn't take the mick?



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

rafaelcasd wrote:
My favourite 5cm



It is a great lens - and you use it well!

Here's a quick sanp of mine with the 28 2.8



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

Lieutenant Z wrote:
From the Opéra Garnier, Paris
first two with 50 1.8, other with 28 2.8 :



Just excellent!



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

georgms wrote:
Some images from this week - but nothing really personal:



All very good but #3 is beautifully lit!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12621
Country: United States

Georg - I love the portrait in your last set.

Curtis - Very nice bokeh play in the music store.

Monty - Nice of you to pop in!



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3761
Country: Singapore

Pass by the loading bay on the way to work every day
This a new-ish addition, cordoned off for the factory upstairs that makes clean room lab equipment
Most times I see them bringing down laminar flow hoods to be loaded into containers
Purpose-built, with non-slip flooring and a mini forklift always on standby
I snuck down when the fellas went out for lunch



spooning (Roll 4668 020) by Zichar, on Flickr


leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12621
Country: United States

Now next time Chin, hop on that forklift and take it for a spin around town!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12621
Country: United States

Most of you have heard of Joe McNally the photographer who works all around the world. Well I was reading an article on his site about lenses and decided to message him on FB to ask if he ever used MF lenses anymore. I also told him about our little project with Nikki.

I was VERY surprised this morning to see that he replied! Here's what Joe had to say:



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3761
Country: Singapore

leighton w wrote:
Now next time Chin, hop on that forklift and take it for a spin around town!


Haha funny you should say that
That thought has struck my mind countless of times
Not this one, but in the same facility, two units down, is a warehouse for electrical appliances
Usually heavy duty air conditioning equipment, compressors, tubs and piping
The driver leaves the keys in so any worker can conveniently use the forklift for his own purposes
Safety and security isn't so big there I suppose



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3761
Country: Singapore

leighton w wrote:
Most of you have heard of Joe McNally the photographer who works all around the world. Well I was reading an article on his site about lenses and decided to message him on FB to asked if he ever used MF lenses anymore. I also told him about our little project with Nikki.

I was VERY surprised this morning to see that he replied! Here's what Joe had to say:



Too cool



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3761
Country: Singapore

Followed my wife back to her old school
Lost a bit of flavour now that it's been refurbished
Looks like any other modern school building



flowerbeds (Roll 4668 015) by Zichar, on Flickr


montym
Registered: Jul 19, 2003
Total Posts: 4717
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
Georg - I love the portrait in your last set.

Curtis - Very nice bokeh play in the music store.

Monty - Nice of you to pop in!

I stop on whenever on 16mm finds its way on my camera.



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 1152
Country: Poland

I wish I had time to comment on all the amazing pics up this weekend. Chin, Ben, Monty, Tony and the rest, very great pics and very inspiring.

I have managed time to actually get behind the camera, it wasn't looking good this weekend (too much beer yesterday) but things cleared up and managed to get a couple on the 55mm. This really is a lens that the more I use the more I like. One is of how amazing this lens is at extreme close ups even without tubes and the other is of a amazing sky photo to compare to how the 28mm does and I have to say it handles and compares pretty well.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12621
Country: United States

Chin - I really like the simplicity of the schoolroom image. It lends itself well to that processing.

Mark - You have discovered what a lot of us have about the 55mm, it's a great all around lens.



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3761
Country: Singapore

Thanks Leighton. I personally find that b&w film is suited to scenes with prominent shadows
Here's another of the school hall:



c+c (Roll 4668 014) by Zichar, on Flickr


pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3009
Country: United States

Zichar wrote:
Thanks Leighton. I personally find that b&w film is suited to scenes with prominent shadows


how do you scan your b&w film? I have the hardest time getting anything decent off my black and white negatives. I'm using Vuescan on a CoolScan 4000 ED, and it seems the threshold to get some proper contrast from a black and white negative is very narrow. It almost leaves me no room to adjust and a lot of my scans are just flat, even though the negs are really popping. Been searching the web for a proper workflow recommendation but so far haven't found anything that works, so my B&w negs are staying in their sleeves.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Chin, I love your graphical work, as we see above. You have a keen eye for possibilities and do an excellent job preparing the image for presentation. This is definitely a winner. Excellent work.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Lieutenant Z wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
rafaelcasd wrote:
Lieutenant Z wrote:
From the Opéra Garnier, Paris
first two with 50 1.8, other with 28 2.8 :



Philippe, you are an artist, on the other hand how could I compete with a Paris opera here in Escondido................

Paris, Pompei, Ephesus, I give up!
(Or maybe I should move)


When I first posted photos on Trekearth most of the members were from Europe and with their long holidays were heading east to India, Thailand, Japan. I finally gave up and I live just north of San Francisco in a beautiful area. But the glories of Europe and the exotic settings of Southeast Asia offered such delights there wasn't much I could post that measured up.

I've mentioned this before but they did a "treasure hunt" that included a photo of something over a hundred years old. I decided I shouldn't cop out by taking a photo of one of the large redwood trees in Muir Woods that is about ten miles from my home. Instead I went into San Francisco and found what is perhaps the only building over a hundred years old, Mission Dolores. I complained at the time that all the folks from Europe needed to do was turn around and shoot. That said, the competitor in me got me to complete the treasure hunt in first place.

The other big disadvantage we have in this country that our holidays are so short. I tease Rinie over the fact she gets 56 days off every year and also can buy more if she wishes. I think she had over 70 days off last year. She spent nearly three weeks with me that included two weeks in Turkey but before that she took a three week bicycle trip from Rotterdam to Rome. She also had a couple of shorter excursions. If Americans get three weeks off they're fortunate.

So we make the best of what is available to us, occasionally taking excursions to more interesting places, as you did when you took your recent trip south. Doubtless, the key is traveling but that requires both time and money which can be in short supply...


Ok we have nice old stuff in Europe. But my kind of photography is "life" and one can shoot street scenes everywhere in the world. One of the very best photographer I've ever seen is an american from Boston : http://www.stevemarkphoto.com/
This guy is an artist : I would be very happy with just 10% of his talent (and 2 weeks of vacation in Boston....)


Looking at the photo of the guy I have to smile. With muscles like that he's like the 500 pound gorilla who sits anywhere he wants... Doing the kind of shooting he does, it likely helps that he is a physically imposing presence. And yes, his work is excellent. If I were to characterize the difference between your work and his I'd say first that he's found a distinctive black and white palette that he applies to all his work. I can't help but wonder whether your increasing use of black and white is as much influenced by Steve as by Monty's work. You continue to use both color and black and white in your work. Secondly, he is very focusing at the margins of society while you tend to work in more elegant settings. I image you can find gritty neighborhoods though you may feel as uncomfortable shooting in such settings as I would. Wearing a tank top with heavily muscled arms and a baseball cap turned backward probably works better than any other "uniform."

My intention when Nikki arrives is to spend a few days in San Francisco and do some street photography. I enjoy doing that kind of work, and did a fair amount of it when shooting with my Canon gear. The challenge is there are few venues in sleepy Marin where one can do such work without being confronted by some unhappy people. One needs crowded streets with people on the go. And you do that kind of work very well Philippe.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

pburke wrote:
Zichar wrote:
Thanks Leighton. I personally find that b&w film is suited to scenes with prominent shadows


how do you scan your b&w film? I have the hardest time getting anything decent off my black and white negatives. I'm using Vuescan on a CoolScan 4000 ED, and it seems the threshold to get some proper contrast from a black and white negative is very narrow. It almost leaves me no room to adjust and a lot of my scans are just flat, even though the negs are really popping. Been searching the web for a proper workflow recommendation but so far haven't found anything that works, so my B&w negs are staying in their sleeves.



Philip - are you scanning from negatives? If not I've had our local "photo shop" save my results to a disc and then I've processed them in PSE with acceptable results. I don't have the facility to scan negatives adedquately thus it hasn't been a problem.



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4212
Country: South Africa

MarkdV wrote:
I wish I had time to comment on all the amazing pics up this weekend. Chin, Ben, Monty, Tony and the rest, very great pics and very inspiring.

I have managed time to actually get behind the camera, it wasn't looking good this weekend (too much beer yesterday) but things cleared up and managed to get a couple on the 55mm. This really is a lens that the more I use the more I like. One is of how amazing this lens is at extreme close ups even without tubes and the other is of a amazing sky photo to compare to how the 28mm does and I have to say it handles and compares pretty well.



Mark the flower is delicious - well done



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