Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2503

1       2       3              2503      
2504
       2505              3822       3823       end

Ronny _Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 1864
Country: Sweden

Nice shot Z


Nikon 105mm f/2.5 AI by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3324
Country: Singapore

Thanks Ronny, Leighton

Leighton: Unfortunately, in our hurry to grow up, we seem to have discarded many of the old which form our identities. Land scarce and a burgeoning population mean only the modern are favored, buildings, places, things, some say even people.
Hmm I guess I'll have to work harder



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 838
Country: United States

Not exactly the normal flower shooting closeup lens(with a MFD of several feet) but for 19 bucks it works and every time I use it this lens reinforces my feelings of just how good some of the old Nikon glass is.. 80-200 4.5 C Auto. Wifes likes the B&W



Todd
Registered: Feb 13, 2003
Total Posts: 1724
Country: United States

D800/E owners: i have a question about your camera and your manual focus lens. I have the 200 mm F/4 and for some reason my camera does not close the iris diaphragm quick enough whenever the shutter is released, it gets overexposed. I physically have to hold the depth of field preview button down while taking the picture To get the correct exposure at the selected f-stop. Have any of you experienced this issue with your manual focus lenses? I do have everything set up correctly in the non-CPU lens data portion of the camera. And I am selecting the correct lens that is attached to the camera.
This probably does not have to pertain just to the D800/E, other cameras can possibly affect it as well. I just don't have anything else other than those two bodies. Please let me know if any of you have experienced this, and possibly provide me with a fix.

Thanks.

Todd



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2405
Country: United States

Todd, two things pop in mind. Is ther any evidence of oil on the aperture blades? The other is, is your 200 an AI or AIS version? If its not, will be hard to mount and my damage your camera.



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 838
Country: United States

Todd wrote:
D800/E owners: i have a question about your camera and your manual focus lens. I have the 200 mm F/4 and for some reason my camera does not close the iris diaphragm quick enough whenever the shutter is released, it gets overexposed. I physically have to hold the depth of field preview button down while taking the picture To get the correct exposure at the selected f-stop. Have any of you experienced this issue with your manual focus lenses? I do have everything set up correctly in the non-CPU lens data portion of the camera. And I am selecting the correct lens that is attached to the camera.
This probably does not have to pertain just to the D800/E, other cameras can possibly affect it as well. I just don't have anything else other than those two bodies. Please let me know if any of you have experienced this, and possibly provide me with a fix.

Thanks.

Todd


Are you allowing the lens to control the aperture with the ring or using camera control?



djjohnr13
Registered: Jan 12, 2013
Total Posts: 30
Country: N/A



Fallen Tree at Sunrise - Briones
85mm f/2.0 AIS



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 11974
Country: United States

Todd wrote:
Hello All.... I am new to the manual focus portion of this forum. Manual focus is not new to me, I just haven't taken photos that way since 2001 when I converted to digital. Anyway, there are some really fine photos here so far. Very sharp and crisp. Amazing quality with todays digital cameras.

I currently own the Nikon D800E and D800 camera bodies and fast glass to go with it. However yesterday, I was at my local camera store looking at the used equipment (lenses) and I purchased the Nikon 105mm f/2.5 ais and the 200mm f/4 ais lenses, both in near mint condition. I have to say, the 105mm f/2.5 is one sharp lens! I wanted one of these bak in the film days when I had my Nikon FM2 body. Well now I do.

My question to you all is.... How do you all achieve such sharp focus with these manual lenses, mainly the long ones? I know the nikon bodies have the green dot (in focus indicator) on the screen inside the viewfinder of the camera, but it is a slow process to nail the focus. I guess I have to get used to it again and practice a lot. Did any of you change out your focusing screens? If so, which one did you choose? If it was not replaced, do you just rely on the "in focus" indicator on the screen? Just curious. Thanks in advance for the help...

Todd
www.toddhargisphotography.com


Welcome Todd. You'll discover we're a friendly bunch, so doubtless you'll be hearing from quite a few of us as the world turns. If you've followed this thread at all you know we have participants from around the world, so folks show up at all times of the day.

Like many of us you're making a return visit to manual focusing. Sadly, when I shot with a Nikkormat camera forty plus years ago, I didn't feel I could afford Nikkor lenses and so had a few Soligor lenses. Strange to say, I'd actually forgotten about that experience until after I'd bought a D700 and a copy of the 105 f/2.5 AI-s. In fact, it was that lens that began this adventure for me. The first thread i initiated on FM was devoted to that lens...

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/927477

The response was so surprising to me that I thought it might be fun to have a single thread that celebrated ALL of Nikon's MF lenses. That is how this thread came into being. Needless to say, I was surprised at how photographers from around the world would respond. So what you're experiencing has been felt over and over again by folks who've shown up here to join the celebration.

You will likely hear from folks who've swapped out their view screen, some for very old screen from assorted cameras, some with the Katzeye screen. Personally, I've found the standard screen gets me where I want to go, but as Leighton says it really is all about practice, practice, practice. Of course, it helps to have decent eyesight. I might feel differently if I were using glasses. So if your eyesight is good, I'd say there is nothing wrong with swapping out the screen, but perhaps you want to give it a bit of time before doing so and put that 105 f/2.5 AI-s to work. Here is one of the first shots I took with the lens, well before I understood how to enter the lens in the Non-CPU register. It was a lucky shot, but sometimes luck helps the beginner...



Happy shooting. Hope to see you on the thread again.



Todd
Registered: Feb 13, 2003
Total Posts: 1724
Country: United States

kwoodard wrote:
Todd, two things pop in mind. Is ther any evidence of oil on the aperture blades? The other is, is your 200 an AI or AIS version? If its not, will be hard to mount and my damage your camera.


I inspected the lens and found that the lever for the iris has some slack in it before the blades start to move. All blades are there, its the slack that is causing the issue I think. There is another copy of this lens at the store, I'll test it out today. The lens is AIS like my 105mm. It attaches to the camera body smoothly.

Thanks for the help...

Todd



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 11974
Country: United States

Lieutenant Z wrote:
24 PCE (the last one)





I haven't been around enough Philippe to understand whether this is your last 24 PCE lens you've tried, or the last shot with a copy of the lens that has been in your possession for a brief time. The shot has all the hallmarks of your work, however, which means it is excellent. Nice to see you still find time in your very busy life to share your work with us and to contribute a bit of humor. I once owned a small Saab station wagon, of which I was quite fond...

Happy shooting my friend.



Todd
Registered: Feb 13, 2003
Total Posts: 1724
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Todd wrote:
Hello All.... I am new to the manual focus portion of this forum. Manual focus is not new to me, I just haven't taken photos that way since 2001 when I converted to digital. Anyway, there are some really fine photos here so far. Very sharp and crisp. Amazing quality with todays digital cameras.

I currently own the Nikon D800E and D800 camera bodies and fast glass to go with it. However yesterday, I was at my local camera store looking at the used equipment (lenses) and I purchased the Nikon 105mm f/2.5 ais and the 200mm f/4 ais lenses, both in near mint condition. I have to say, the 105mm f/2.5 is one sharp lens! I wanted one of these bak in the film days when I had my Nikon FM2 body. Well now I do.

My question to you all is.... How do you all achieve such sharp focus with these manual lenses, mainly the long ones? I know the nikon bodies have the green dot (in focus indicator) on the screen inside the viewfinder of the camera, but it is a slow process to nail the focus. I guess I have to get used to it again and practice a lot. Did any of you change out your focusing screens? If so, which one did you choose? If it was not replaced, do you just rely on the "in focus" indicator on the screen? Just curious. Thanks in advance for the help...

Todd
www.toddhargisphotography.com


Welcome Todd. You'll discover we're a friendly bunch, so doubtless you'll be hearing from quite a few of us as the world turns. If you've followed this thread at all you know we have participants from around the world, so folks show up at all times of the day.

Like many of us you're making a return visit to manual focusing. Sadly, when I shot with a Nikkormat camera forty plus years ago, I didn't feel I could afford Nikkor lenses and so had a few Soligor lenses. Strange to say, I'd actually forgotten about that experience until after I'd bought a D700 and a copy of the 105 f/2.5 AI-s. In fact, it was that lens that began this adventure for me. The first thread i initiated on FM was devoted to that lens...

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/927477

The response was so surprising to me that I thought it might be fun to have a single thread that celebrated ALL of Nikon's MF lenses. That is how this thread came into being. Needless to say, I was surprised at how photographers from around the world would respond. So what you're experiencing has been felt over and over again by folks who've shown up here to join the celebration.

You will likely hear from folks who've swapped out their view screen, some for very old screen from assorted cameras, some with the Katzeye screen. Personally, I've found the standard screen gets me where I want to go, but as Leighton says it really is all about practice, practice, practice. Of course, it helps to have decent eyesight. I might feel differently if I were using glasses. So if your eyesight is good, I'd say there is nothing wrong with swapping out the screen, but perhaps you want to give it a bit of time before doing so and put that 105 f/2.5 AI-s to work. Here is one of the first shots I took with the lens, well before I understood how to enter the lens in the Non-CPU register. It was a lucky shot, but sometimes luck helps the beginner...



Happy shooting. Hope to see you on the thread again.




Wow, great shot. Thank you for the warm welcome. I'll get better at it, I just have to slow down and practice. Thanks...

Todd



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 3968
Country: United States

djjohnr13 wrote:


Fallen Tree at Sunrise - Briones
85mm f/2.0 AIS


Very nice image. Like the colors and texture.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 11974
Country: United States

rankamateur wrote:
Not exactly the normal flower shooting closeup lens(with a MFD of several feet) but for 19 bucks it works and every time I use it this lens reinforces my feelings of just how good some of the old Nikon glass is.. 80-200 4.5 C Auto. Wifes likes the B&W


The second suits my taste more Ron, but I definitely love the shot. I'm assuming you modified the aperture ring of this old beauty so you could mount it. I note on photosynthesis that there is a Nikon conversion kit for the lens, but for $19 I expect it wasn't converted.

Again, you've demonstrated that whatever the optical design, these old lenses are a pleasure to play with. I spoke about Jose adding lenses to his kit and Peter reminded me that Ben has done the same with a vengeance. I imagine we should include you in that club because you've definitely been adventurous in your acquisitions.

Sweet work Ron.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 3968
Country: United States

Tony and Leighton, thank you for the image comments.

Todd, welcome aboard. Looks like you are onto what the 200 f4 problem might be. On mine, there is not any slack as you describe. Good idea to compare it to another copy. Oil on the aperture blades as mentioned is sometimes a likely cause.

Tony, nice model images of Jordan. Your lighting set-up works well.

Ron, I like the color version of the flowers.

Philippe, another nice image with the 24 PCE. You hint this is the last image with it. Are you returning it? If so, are you going back to the 28 or the 180?
Scott



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 11974
Country: United States

Todd wrote:

Wow, great shot. Thank you for the warm welcome. I'll get better at it, I just have to slow down and practice. Thanks...

Todd


And that is precisely what is so satisfying about this kind of shooting. I've spoken in the past in a way some might find blasphemous, especially on a Sunday morning... but I find looking into the viewfinder as I turn the focusing ring and watch the image slowly come into focus as almost a religious experience. One generally doesn't do that quickly... one takes a breath and drops into the moment, into the scene to be photographed. I'm one with the camera and lens as I compose the shot, then take it.

I had a very sweet kit of Canon L lenses when I picked up a D700 on the advice of a friend who was blown away by the camera. I bought a few AF lenses, but then noted the 105 f/2.5 listed on folks signature lines, which at the time were displayed with each post. I was simply curious, but from the first time I mounted that lens, I knew I'd come home.

Eventually, I sold 12 Canon lenses and a 5D, sold all but three of my Nikon AF lenses and bought the MF lenses you see in my profile. Needless to say, this is where I want to be. I'm simply having too much fun to even dream of going elsewhere. Glad you found us Todd.



Lieutenant Z
Registered: Nov 21, 2010
Total Posts: 2840
Country: France

Curtis, Scott, thank you. Actually I rented a 24 PCE for 10 days.
Scott, I mainly use my 50/1.8 ais and 85/18 HC right now but I intend to rent a 24/1.4 G soon....



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 838
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
rankamateur wrote:
Not exactly the normal flower shooting closeup lens(with a MFD of several feet) but for 19 bucks it works and every time I use it this lens reinforces my feelings of just how good some of the old Nikon glass is.. 80-200 4.5 C Auto. Wifes likes the B&W


The second suits my taste more Ron, but I definitely love the shot. I'm assuming you modified the aperture ring of this old beauty so you could mount it. I note on photosynthesis that there is a Nikon conversion kit for the lens, but for $19 I expect it wasn't converted.

Again, you've demonstrated that whatever the optical design, these old lenses are a pleasure to play with. I spoke about Jose adding lenses to his kit and Peter reminded me that Ben has done the same with a vengeance. I imagine we should include you in that club because you've definitely been adventurous in your acquisitions.

Sweet work Ron.


She has a lovely factory ring on her! The ring is still readily available and fits all versions of this lens labeled C Auto



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 8617
Country: United States

rankamateur wrote:
Not exactly the normal flower shooting closeup lens(with a MFD of several feet) but for 19 bucks it works and every time I use it this lens reinforces my feelings of just how good some of the old Nikon glass is.. 80-200 4.5 C Auto. Wifes likes the B&W


Beautiful shot Ron, I'm with your wife, I like the first one best.



Foggy14
Registered: May 01, 2010
Total Posts: 905
Country: United States

Hi gang, busy week, but wanted to weigh-in on the amazing number of great shots.

Scott, the red brick house and tree shadow is very nice. Is that the same building in your WA entry? That one's a wonderful photo.

Americo, really like "For Poe." The balance between the foreground lighting and the colorful bokeh looks spot on to me.

Chin, great shots of your dog.

Chuong, terrific "daughter in a bag" shots.

Ray, my condolences on the passing of your mom. The Seaboard bench and the brick wall mural are really nice. Love the richness of the Bok Tower shots. Thanks for your comment on the train shot.

Larry, welcome! The f11 shot of the statue and sky is really nice.

Georg, thanks for the comment on "Going Home." I really like your b&w of the boats on the quay. Love the layers in the shallow water shot.

Jose, the "extreme" macro of "1611" is very cool. "Menacing Clouds" is a terrific shot.

Peter, your MA entry is a wonderful shot.

Curtis, welcome back from your sabbatical! Great shadow play in your leaf images.

John, cool shots of your girls. I really like the perspective of the distant ferry shot. Great panos and "Funky Sunset Colors" is a real winner.

Alan, very nice shots with your long lenses.

Tony, great buffalo pano!

Leighton, love the barn shots.

Sam, R2D2 is a real eye catcher.

Kevin, I like your b&w conversions, especially the shadows.

Mike, you're killing me with your aurora shots! I don't need a Noct ... I don't need a Noct ...

Dean, really like the Siem Reap photos.

Samy, love the Hoopoe and Roller shots.

Rafael, "Moonrise" is beautiful.

Ronny, great composition of the "thing."

Philippe, cool shot of the joggers with your PC lens. I don't need a PC ... I don't need a PC ...

Ron, really like the orchids on the black background.

John, nice perspective on the "Fallen Tree."



Ronny _Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 1864
Country: Sweden

Thanks


Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr

Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



1       2       3              2503      
2504
       2505              3822       3823       end