Honey 6 marmite 1
/forum/topic/824212/0



LordV
Registered: Jan 02, 2006
Total Posts: 28488
Country: United Kingdom

Always thought marmite was a minority taste (I like it though)

Brian v.








gerard-64
Registered: Feb 09, 2009
Total Posts: 87
Country: France

I believe they love that...Well done!



Budzzlife
Registered: Sep 25, 2009
Total Posts: 332
Country: Saudi Arabia

great shots



michael kilner
Registered: Feb 09, 2007
Total Posts: 9704
Country: United Kingdom

excellent,like pigs at a trough



Adrian Jones
Registered: Sep 12, 2006
Total Posts: 1926
Country: United Kingdom

Great images Brian, I wonder what sort of reception the one feeding on Marmite will get if it takes any back to the nest.

Adrian



DQE1.0
Registered: Oct 28, 2007
Total Posts: 563
Country: United States

Re the Marmite -

In part of the USA, there is an aphorism that goes something like this: "10,000 flies (or ants) can't be wrong, Marmite must be good"! (insert friendly smiles here)

I personally found Wikipedia's entry for Marmite to be helpful:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmite
-------------------------------

Great photos!

Marmite appears to work better than honey - would you agree, at least for these ants?

I'm not sure this substance is available in the USA, but if it attracts other critters as well as these ants, it would surely be worth attempting to locate a source of supply.



LordV
Registered: Jan 02, 2006
Total Posts: 28488
Country: United Kingdom

Thanks for the comments all

Adrian - did notice most of the marmite was still there at the end of the day whilst the honey had disappeared. I was actually trying to see if flies would be attracted to it but they weren't.

DQE - think you got it the wrong way round - the marmite only attracted one ant vs 6 for the honey
I suspect you might have trouble finding it in the US. Many years ago on our first trip to the states as part of the trip we visited some friends who were working over there and they asked us to take some marmite out to them as they couldn't find any.
This lead to some fun in customs where seeing the rules we thought it best to declare it - after a long discussion with the customs officer about what it was- he ended up saying "and you eat that " !
The friend's children were at school there and they took some marmite sandwiches into school and let their US friends taste them which was universally greeted with "yuck". One of those things you have to had as a baby to appreciate

Brian v.



MichAg92
Registered: Feb 08, 2005
Total Posts: 4447
Country: United States

When we lived in the UK, all the ex-pat yanks brought each other peanut butter on various trips back to the US, and our British friends were not impressed with this sandwich covering, either - to each his own, I guess Gotta say I agree with the majority vote ants



LordV
Registered: Jan 02, 2006
Total Posts: 28488
Country: United Kingdom

MichAg92 wrote:
When we lived in the UK, all the ex-pat yanks brought each other peanut butter on various trips back to the US, and our British friends were not impressed with this sandwich covering, either - to each his own, I guess Gotta say I agree with the majority vote ants


Think you are right Amy- depends on what you were given as a baby where marmite soldiers are/were a favourite here.Suspect this is partly something to do with it being seen as a good vitamin source in post WW2 rationing.
Brian v.



MountainTop
Registered: Mar 27, 2008
Total Posts: 341
Country: United States

Nice experiment.

Marmite is widely available on the West Coast of America. Wayward members of the Commonwealth need not go without. There's even a local place that makes an ice cream, if you are so inclined. I am not.



LordV
Registered: Jan 02, 2006
Total Posts: 28488
Country: United Kingdom

MountainTop wrote:
Nice experiment.

Marmite is widely available on the West Coast of America. Wayward members of the Commonwealth need not go without. There's even a local place that makes an ice cream, if you are so inclined. I am not.


but ice cream !!!
Brian v.



DQE1.0
Registered: Oct 28, 2007
Total Posts: 563
Country: United States

LordV wrote:
MountainTop wrote:
Nice experiment.

Marmite is widely available on the West Coast of America. Wayward members of the Commonwealth need not go without. There's even a local place that makes an ice cream, if you are so inclined. I am not.


but ice cream !!!
Brian v.



Surely MountainTop refers to a unique UK ice cream. Ice cream is essentially a food staple in the overweight US, with more flavors than it is possible to enumerate.

Yet the US has not taken to warm beer, seemingly a long-standing epidemic in the UK!

We'll know it's time for government intervention if vegemite sandwiches become available, courtesy of our Australian friends! Vegemite was made well known in the US through a rock song in perhaps the 70s. Can't remember the title or group, but they made an early MTV (Music TV) rock video. In quickly reading the wikipedia entry for vegemite, it sounds somewhat similar to marmelite. Perhaps Lord V or one of the Australian macro photographers could enlighten the rest of us?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegemite

With globalization increasing, I wonder if we'll have nationally distinct foods much longer? Somehow I don't think haggis will become too popular outside Scotland, though. In the US, grits (a type of food that is popular in the southeast US), are only popular in that region, for example. Also, in parts of the US it's common to eat one's breakfast fried eggs with ketchup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grits

Perhaps macro photography can serve as a vector for transmitting unique food preferences. Yet I share Lord V's belief that one has to eat some foods from childhood or the taste is unlikely to be acquired!



LordV
Registered: Jan 02, 2006
Total Posts: 28488
Country: United Kingdom

DQE1.0 wrote:
LordV wrote:
MountainTop wrote:
Nice experiment.

Marmite is widely available on the West Coast of America. Wayward members of the Commonwealth need not go without. There's even a local place that makes an ice cream, if you are so inclined. I am not.


but ice cream !!!
Brian v.




We'll know it's time for government intervention if vegemite sandwiches become available, courtesy of our Australian friends! Vegemite was made well known in the US through a rock song in perhaps the 70s. Can't remember the title or group, but they made an early MTV (Music TV) rock video. In quickly reading the wikipedia entry for vegemite, it sounds somewhat similar to marmelite. Perhaps Lord V or one of the Australian macro photographers could enlighten the rest of us?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegemite



DQE - Vegemite is just about identical to marmite. Just to show how rated these foods are, when we were looking at universities for our daughter, we stayed in a sports hotel in Nottingham. Unknown to us but to the delight of my son and daughter it turned out the Australian cricket team were staying there for a test match at Trent Bridge against England. One of the highlights of breakfast was seeing the Australian team manager walk in for breakfast with a dozen bottles of vegemite for the team. They obviously didn't trust marmite

Brian v.