#103 Look it up WHERE?
/forum/topic/1166184/0



rotorwash4944
Registered: Jan 09, 2011
Total Posts: 159
Country: United States

Remember THESE?!



Cloudbow
Registered: Nov 24, 2004
Total Posts: 1793
Country: United States

Ah, yes. So many school reports were written from World Book Encyclopedia. I remember going to our neighbor's house when I needed to use them because a set of encyclopedias was not something even remotely affordable for us. We did eventually get a single volume Columbia Encyclopedia.

Bev



rotorwash4944
Registered: Jan 09, 2011
Total Posts: 159
Country: United States

The set in this picture was found in a garage sale... That family had "upgraded" to Encyclopedia Britanica! I remember the traveling salesman coming to the house, and the price was way out of our reach. Now, we have it all and more in our pocket.

What sent my mind back to the days of elementary school projects, and what our smartphones lack, was the distinct smell of the pages

Thanks for looking.



James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4435
Country: United States

I'm fighting a sudden urge to turn to the clear acetate human biology pages...Nice composition!



rotorwash4944
Registered: Jan 09, 2011
Total Posts: 159
Country: United States

James Markus wrote:
I'm fighting a sudden urge to turn to the clear acetate human biology pages...Nice composition!


OMG- I LOVED those pages! Thank you for your thoughts!



robertjm
Registered: Mar 21, 2002
Total Posts: 725
Country: United States

My father was an elementary school teacher back in the 1970s, when I was a child. He got the teacher's "discount" package, and it was something like $500 back then!! And we got the Annual "Book of 19xx" as well.

I was so angry at Laddie, my young dog, when she ate part of the E-F volume where the flags of the world were located
. ;-)

(yes, I said Laddie and she in the same paragraph. Named her that despite my mother's suggestion Lassie might be more appropriate).



rotorwash4944
Registered: Jan 09, 2011
Total Posts: 159
Country: United States

One of my favorite lookups was about the human eye and how we see. I was amazed with the example of how an "afterimage" is momentarily burned onto our retina. There was a picture of an American flag, in off-colors. The caption instructed you to look at the image for 30 seconds, then quickly look away at a white piece of paper. The afterimage that was produced was that of a flag in the correct red white and blue!

I've remembered that page for years. Now, the amount of web pages I can click through in a sitting is staggering, but good luck recalling the location of something I've surfed only two minutes earlier.

One of the caveats of technology I suppose.