Sigma DP2 Merrill: Have any of you tried it?
/forum/topic/1150855/33

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millsart
Registered: Apr 29, 2009
Total Posts: 6115
Country: N/A

carstenw wrote:
It looks like straight RRS stuff, but note that the slider only allows for corrected sweep panos, not row/column stuff.




DP2M isn't that well suited for mosaics I've found because the buffer takes so long to clear after 7 shots, especially if you shoot raw. Cloud motion and changing light become a frequent problem.

Being that its only a 45mm equiv lens too, unless you want to capture something insanely wide, your just not going to have enough focal length to isolation each bit of scene for a mosaic.

I generally do multi row stuff around 150mm+ with my Gigapan head.

Besides, with the sheer resolution of the DP2m, even with a single row pano you can easily produce a very nice looking 40" print



nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India







nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India







nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India







john_edwards
Registered: Jun 30, 2005
Total Posts: 1972
Country: United States

nandadevieast wrote:







This is one cool shot-----great.


nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India







nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India

chairs shot is ISO 800



Tariq Gibran
Registered: Oct 01, 2006
Total Posts: 12901
Country: United States

Nice work!



inglis
Registered: Feb 24, 2011
Total Posts: 432
Country: United States

Great shots on this page!

Millsart, do you only use the indexing rotator for pano shots or do you add a pano head of some sort?



sculptormic
Registered: Feb 05, 2012
Total Posts: 2582
Country: Netherlands

Fine stuff nandadevieast! Especially the factory shot. Great scene!

One from my series.







millsart
Registered: Apr 29, 2009
Total Posts: 6115
Country: N/A

inglis wrote:
Great shots on this page!

Millsart, do you only use the indexing rotator for pano shots or do you add a pano head of some sort?



Honestly with modern stitching software like PTGui or Auto Pano Pro I hardly ever even bother with entrance pupils, focus rails for nodal point adjustment etc. Just extra gear (and expense) you don't really need, especially for doing single row pano's.

I have a generic L bracket I put the DP2M onto though so I can shoot vertical frames but really thats its, ballhead, then indexing rotator and L bracket.

Nothing wrong with using focus rails etc, but probably 99 times out of 100 I'm just not going to have anything in the foreground that the software can't manage to correct.

My advice is always start out without it, and then only if you see specific problems add more gear, if and only if those situations arise



glacierpete
Registered: Sep 17, 2010
Total Posts: 148
Country: N/A

millsart wrote:
inglis wrote:
Great shots on this page!

Millsart, do you only use the indexing rotator for pano shots or do you add a pano head of some sort?



Honestly with modern stitching software like PTGui or Auto Pano Pro I hardly ever even bother with entrance pupils, focus rails for nodal point adjustment etc. Just extra gear (and expense) you don't really need, especially for doing single row pano's.

I have a generic L bracket I put the DP2M onto though so I can shoot vertical frames but really thats its, ballhead, then indexing rotator and L bracket.

Nothing wrong with using focus rails etc, but probably 99 times out of 100 I'm just not going to have anything in the foreground that the software can't manage to correct.

My advice is always start out without it, and then only if you see specific problems add more gear, if and only if those situations arise


Millsart,
I use a simple MiniKiss2 nodal point adapter made for the DP2M. Nothing to adjust in the field. It is made from magnesit, weight is around 60 Gramm.
A nodal point adapter is helpful when something closer to the camera is included in the image. It looks like the one for the Lumix on their website.
http://pt4pano.com/de/products/restbestand-minikiss
I a not affiliated with them, just a happy customer.



nandadevieast
Registered: Aug 12, 2012
Total Posts: 554
Country: India

Thanks guys,
Here's what i'm up to:
http://dpmerrill.blogspot.in/



sculptormic
Registered: Feb 05, 2012
Total Posts: 2582
Country: Netherlands

Le Treport from above.
I took these shots many times with many different cameras and the difference in clearness, sharpness and detail is amazing. Today I took some shots with the NEX-7 + Minolta Macro 100/4 as well and the images look hazy and unsharp compared to these.
Could be the lens or me but I don't think so.













RickPerry
Registered: Mar 29, 2009
Total Posts: 743
Country: United States

Here is a blog by Gary Mercer - an accomplished DP2 M user.

http://garymercerphoto.blogspot.com/2012/11/photographing-works-of-art-with-sigma.html



Lawrence Beck
Registered: Dec 17, 2006
Total Posts: 30
Country: United States

RickPerry wrote:
Here is a blog by Gary Mercer - an accomplished DP2 M user.

http://garymercerphoto.blogspot.com/2012/11/photographing-works-of-art-with-sigma.html


Interesting blog piece Rick, though Mercer clearly shows a complete lack of understanding about Bayer sensors that don't have AA filters, such as the Leica DMR, the Leica M8 & 9, Kodak SLR C, and all medium format sensors... to name a few. He states in paragraph 7: "There is NO bayer sensored camera that is capable of capturing the paper texture without blurring the details due to the anti-aliasing ( blur) filters on bayer sensors. Yes--I could use a bayer sensor camera sans the anti-aliazing filter, but the pattern in the paper would have created a moire problem."

This glaring lack of understanding misinforms and compromises the usefulness of the post and should be taken with a grain of salt, given this inaccuracy. I own both the DMR and the Sigma and love the Sigma for it's incredible per pixel resolution. I've shot both side by side with a lens on the Leica that comes close to approximating the fov of the Sigma and the Sigma kills it in terms of resolution! No contest. The Sigma has become my "pocket tech cam" because of it's superior resolution but the Leica DMR produces more accurate colors without question. It also captures paper texture beautifully with the 100 APO Macro or 60 Macro lens and there is no moiré in spite of the lack of an AA filter. Of course, both of the aforementioned lenses are better suited than the 45mm focal length of the Sigma to photographing flat art... but his test was about how the Sigma excels at photographing art.

The use of the 35 f1.8 lens on the Sony A77 is also a very poor choice for art reproduction as this lens is not designed for such. When doing a test where art reproduction is the goal it makes no sense to try and compromise the end results by selecting a lens for the Sony that approximates the focal length of the Sigma lens. A macro lens on the Sony would have done far better, since the artist Carlos Estevez commented on the superior image rendering detail of the Sigma.

The DMR or A77 with a macro lens are both far more expensive than the Sigma so I don't mean to imply in any way that this is a fair comparison, but Mercer states that there is NO Bayer sensored capable of capturing the details due to the AA filter on Bayer sensors, and this is clearly not true. Serious art repro photographers are using medium format backs for art reproduction, and the multishot backs excel at this type of work. The aforementioned have no AA filters and do a far better job of reproducing color accurately than the Foveon can.

That Mercer is very happy with his DP2M is obvious. I'm equally happy with my DP2M for landscapes... though the colors require adjustments in certain areas that I don't have to adjust on my DMR (though I'll gladly make these adjustments with the DP2M colors since the image is so much sharper and capable of being printed larger than those from the DMR). The glaring inaccuracies regarding Bayer sensors and the poor choice of lens on the Sony A77 reduce this review to one of fanboy enthusiasm rather than an accurate comparison,

Lawrence



mpmendenhall
Registered: Aug 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2034
Country: United States

A couple DP2M shots from this weekend (Bearwaller Gap Trail, Cordell Hull Lake, Tennessee).
I really like the camera's ability to capture "busy" complexly detailed scenes. With my 5D, I typically prefer results from closer/simpler compositions, because I wouldn't get enough supporting detail to make the image more than a jumbled mess (which is still what you get when displayed at web resolution...). The pristine pixel-level detail from the DP2M is letting me re-think what compositions are "feasible" to capture (at least without stitching).











cputeq
Registered: Jun 25, 2008
Total Posts: 6036
Country: United States

Just to chime in to this thread - I have no real intention of buying this camera, but I must admit I was impressed after I stumbled across LL's DP2 field test last night (I'm slow, I know) - the shot-vs-shot examples were quite impressive, and this camera seems to capture an incredible amount of detail.



ultrapix
Registered: Feb 03, 2010
Total Posts: 684
Country: Italy

mpmendenhall wrote:
A couple DP2M shots from this weekend (Bearwaller Gap Trail, Cordell Hull Lake, Tennessee).
I really like the camera's ability to capture "busy" complexly detailed scenes. With my 5D, I typically prefer results from closer/simpler compositions, because I wouldn't get enough supporting detail to make the image more than a jumbled mess (which is still what you get when displayed at we resolution...). The pristine pixel-level detail from the DP2M is letting me re-think what compositions are "feasible" to capture (at least without stitching).












It couldn't be said better

Same that large format photography.


Tariq Gibran
Registered: Oct 01, 2006
Total Posts: 12901
Country: United States

Lawrence Beck wrote:
It also captures paper texture beautifully with the 100 APO Macro or 60 Macro lens and there is no moiré in spite of the lack of an AA filter. Of course, both of the aforementioned lenses are better suited than the 45mm focal length of the Sigma to photographing flat art... but his test was about how the Sigma excels at photographing art.


Hi Lawrence,

I shoot quite a bit of original art work for various museums and artists and specifically brought up the poor choice of focal length for this intended purpose in one of Gary's threads about the subject at DpReview. I'm a bit perplexed that he would recommend the DP2M for that use for the reasons you cite.

I have used everything going back to the Fuji S2 Pro, Canon 5D2, Sony a900 and MF Hasselblad H3D-39 for the reproduction of art work, all with medium focal length Macros having an angle of view around 27 degrees or so. A normal to wide/ normal would be way down on the list of appropriate focal lengths to use. Likewise, while the Foveon based cameras certainly have that "wow" factor, it comes with a few restrictions with regard to ultimate color fidelity/ accuracy - not to mention the "built-in", clarity like contrast boost effect (which is one of the aspects most folks are attracted to when they see Foveon images imo). All of those factors work against using the DP2 Merrill (and likely any current Foveon based camera) when the goal is the most faithful reproduction of color and contrast to the original.



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