Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens Firmware v1.2.0 update!
/forum/topic/1142217/2

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4x4rock
Registered: May 04, 2005
Total Posts: 1571
Country: United States

Just updated...using a 64MB cf card ...I had the batteries registered so I cleared them first.

Grip was attached with both generic batteries from ebay.



avuroski
Registered: Nov 03, 2005
Total Posts: 251
Country: United States

Just updated mine with 5D3 and a macbook pro, no problems at all. Used a backup 16gb Sandisk extreme SD card and followed the directions. Fast and easy.



hfgarris
Registered: Mar 10, 2006
Total Posts: 375
Country: United States

My 40mm f/2.8 lens firmware update was successful...

Used 5D Mk3 w/latest firmware update, fresh battery, Mac running Mountain Lion, and a Lexar 2GB CF card.

Hope others have good success as well...


-howard



EB-1
Registered: Jan 09, 2003
Total Posts: 22527
Country: United States

Why do need a computer to update the lens firmware, doesn't it work from the memory card?

EBH



Monito
Registered: Jan 28, 2005
Total Posts: 10079
Country: Canada

EB-1 wrote: Why do need a computer to update the lens firmware, doesn't it work from the memory card?

If you don't want to use a computer, you could always open up the card and chisel the firmware bits directly onto the chip.



stanj
Registered: Aug 05, 2003
Total Posts: 9691
Country: United States

EB-1 wrote:
Why do need a computer to update the lens firmware, doesn't it work from the memory card?

EBH


Yes it does. People are just specifying what computer and OS they used to write the firmware to the card.



bigrob
Registered: Dec 13, 2005
Total Posts: 86
Country: United Kingdom

Access wrote:
I got the error the first time (as described above). The second time worked fine. Here was my exact procedure.

The first time, I had the camera power on, removed the CF card, wrote it (and flushed it) on the PC, put it back in the camera, and updated firmware.

After this, the camera was locked up at 2978% or something so I yanked the battery. When I powered it back on, I got a message that the lens update had failed and that I should try to update it again. I removed the lens, power on just to make sure the camera is still okay, power off, put the lens back on.

Then update again and it works.

So probably, just have the camera power off, CF card in (with the lens firmware on it), the lens mounted, and then turn the camera power on and update first thing. Also, I had a formatted SD card in the whole time that I didn't touch. Hope that helps.


Had the same problem first time round. Did as you said, not sure if you took out the battery without turning it off - I did.

Then followed your procedure and it worked fine. I didn't have an SD card in. I was using a Duracell 32gb CF card 600x.

Thanks



Monito
Registered: Jan 28, 2005
Total Posts: 10079
Country: Canada

Access wrote: The first time, I had the camera power on, removed the CF card, wrote it (and flushed it) on the PC, put it back in the camera, and updated firmware. After this, the camera was locked up at 2978% or something so I yanked the battery.

Always turn any camera's power off before you remove any memory card.

Similarly always turn any camera's power off before you insert any memory card.

Basically, always turn any camera's power off before you open the card bay door.



stanj
Registered: Aug 05, 2003
Total Posts: 9691
Country: United States

Curious about why, since opening the door shuts it off already. I never shut down a camera before swapping a card and miraculously avoided disaster, in more than 10 years of doing it...



goosemang
Registered: Oct 21, 2011
Total Posts: 1579
Country: United States

hmm, my lens falls within the serial numbers effected, but i can't make this glitch happen no matter what i do so i'm not even gonna bother updating



Monito
Registered: Jan 28, 2005
Total Posts: 10079
Country: Canada

stanj wrote: Curious about why, since opening the door shuts it off already. I never shut down a camera before swapping a card and miraculously avoided disaster, in more than 10 years of doing it...

You've been a little bit lucky, but most likely because you've waited long enough to let the operating system write all files to the card and update the file tables.

It also means that all the pins make and break contact with the camera off. It is much like the idea that with an external USB card reader you put the card in the reader and then connect the USB.

I don't turn off the camera to swap lenses, but I do turn it off to open the card door.



orcastu
Registered: Jan 24, 2012
Total Posts: 53
Country: United States

Updated my 40mm to v 1.2.0 with my 5DMk3 v1.1.3 and windows 7 64 bit. No issues



stanj
Registered: Aug 05, 2003
Total Posts: 9691
Country: United States

Monito wrote:
You've been a little bit lucky, but most likely because you've waited long enough to let the operating system write all files to the card and update the file tables.


Well yes. I wait for the red light to go off first



pixelpix
Registered: Jul 19, 2002
Total Posts: 376
Country: Australia

stanj wrote:
Curious about why, since opening the door shuts it off already. I never shut down a camera before swapping a card and miraculously avoided disaster, in more than 10 years of doing it...


+1



EB-1
Registered: Jan 09, 2003
Total Posts: 22527
Country: United States

Monito wrote:
stanj wrote: Curious about why, since opening the door shuts it off already. I never shut down a camera before swapping a card and miraculously avoided disaster, in more than 10 years of doing it...

You've been a little bit lucky, but most likely because you've waited long enough to let the operating system write all files to the card and update the file tables.

It also means that all the pins make and break contact with the camtera off. It is much like the idea that with an external USB card reader you put the card in the reader and then connect the USB.

I don't turn off the camera to swap lenses, but I do turn it off to open the card door.


It is not necessary to turn the camera off. CF cards are designed to be hot pluggable. The Vcc and ground pins are longer, ensuring that they make contact first and break contact last.

Ebh



alundeb
Registered: Nov 06, 2005
Total Posts: 4243
Country: Norway

EB-1 wrote:
Monito wrote:
stanj wrote: Curious about why, since opening the door shuts it off already. I never shut down a camera before swapping a card and miraculously avoided disaster, in more than 10 years of doing it...

You've been a little bit lucky, but most likely because you've waited long enough to let the operating system write all files to the card and update the file tables.

It also means that all the pins make and break contact with the camtera off. It is much like the idea that with an external USB card reader you put the card in the reader and then connect the USB.

I don't turn off the camera to swap lenses, but I do turn it off to open the card door.


It is not necessary to turn the camera off. CF cards are designed to be hot pluggable. The Vcc and ground pins are longer, ensuring that they make contact first and break contact last.

Ebh


Turning off the camera doesn't help against card removal during write either. The camera won't turn itself off until the writing is finished. In either case, just wait until the write LED has gone off.
The LED is the only safe guide to when the card can be removed without damage.



hfgarris
Registered: Mar 10, 2006
Total Posts: 375
Country: United States

EB-1 wrote:
Why do need a computer to update the lens firmware, doesn't it work from the memory card?

EBH


When you request the firmware file download, you have to select what format the file is to be in: Mac, or PC, and which version of the operating system you are running. The appropriate file is then downloaded to your computer where it is "unpacked" to the actual upgrade file the camera requires. Of course, then the computer also has to place the file on the memory card you will use with the camera to perform the upgrade. Once all that is done ... you no longer need the computer.



-howard



Access
Registered: Jun 07, 2004
Total Posts: 1441
Country: United States

alundeb wrote:
Turning off the camera doesn't help against card removal during write either. The camera won't turn itself off until the writing is finished. In either case, just wait until the write LED has gone off.
The LED is the only safe guide to when the card can be removed without damage.

Yeah I've never turned the camera off. I just wait for the light to go off and then switch the card (like just about everyone else I know). I remember some of the early DSLRs actually had a little alarm that would beep when you opened the door to inform you that you should not pull the card while it's still writing.

If Datalight DOS is anything like windows (versus Linux), devices like CF cards are mounted as removable meaning writes take priority and the write cache will always be emptied as soon as possible.

Probably what happened here is that the firmware update was only tested in an older camera that didn't store, update, or have access to the battery data. For some reason, the two interfere.

BTW in the embedded world, generally, "off" is not really off. In most cases, flipping the power switch to 'off' merely puts the device to sleep, putting the SRAM and micro in a low-power sleep mode where state is retained. This way you have instant-on capability versus, say, the original Digital Rebel (300D) where after turning the camera on, you could not shoot a photo for about a second or two (because the firmware had to boot up).

So when it locked up in the firmware update, and refused to turn off even if you flipped the switch, that's why. The firmware is hung and nonresponsive to input. Why Canon didn't bother with a hardware watchdog, I don't know. Pulling the battery will power down the micro so you get a reboot when you put it back in. The only state retained when the battery is pulled is battery-backup RAM, flash, and NVRAM.

If you don't believe this, turn your camera off. Then turn it back on, and see how quickly you can take a photo: instantly (as long as your DSLR isn't really old). Now leave the switch on, but open the battery door (with most of the current Canons, this alone cuts the battery power. You don't actually have to eject the battery). Close the battery door, and try to take a photo right away. You can't, because the firmware is booting. It takes around 1-2 seconds before you can take the photo.



WilliamG
Registered: Jun 10, 2008
Total Posts: 665
Country: United States

No problem updating my 1.1.3 5D III + 40mm lens via Mac OS X 10.8 on my 2009 iMac.



ns2397
Registered: Aug 07, 2010
Total Posts: 138
Country: United States

It looks update via Mac OS X is safer than Windows.



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