Oly 24/2.8 vs. Canon 24L TS-E II
/forum/topic/1077627/2

1       2      
3
       end

SKumar25
Registered: May 18, 2006
Total Posts: 2043
Country: Australia

The test shows that on a small part of the image in focus, both lenses have similar sharpness. The other parts of the image are OOF, showing better bokeh characteristics to the Canon.

What else can you draw from the test in relation to quality

staticInc wrote:
I appreciate your comparison. I'm astonished by the OM 24's image "quality". Never thought my little OM 24 could rival the lens I'm planning to purchase...

Enjoy,
Sten



wayne seltzer
Registered: Dec 22, 2007
Total Posts: 4783
Country: United States

Mr Joe wrote:
@wayne seltzer - Hey, how's it going? Sounds like Zeiss fever in your camera bag. Zuiko fever is much less expensive.

I'm going to wait until my next camera body before I try again. I could probably shoot 90% of what I do with a Zeiss 18 or 21, and a Zeiss 28 or 35. The question is, which one(s) to pick.

@philip_pj - If I had a quarter for every Hey Joe reference, I could retire early.
And ironically, I have a 24-70/2.8L that's very sharp across the frame on my 5D II (along with a Zuiko 18, 21, and 28).

Again, it's not a bad lens or a bad camera, it's the combination of a lens tolerance that's off one way, with a camera that's off the other way. Both can be within spec, and you still don't have a sharp picture. And my testing showed lenses that were off on the left side, and others that were off on the right side -- with the same body. Yet all of my Oly lenses worked fine with either body.

Very strange.

I like the 21 for night photography, to get enough sky in and also gives you some of that wide angle dynamic look. 25 is another good focal length too for me.

Oly 18 is a nice lens though.

I need to do more night photography around the bay area here.



SKumar25
Registered: May 18, 2006
Total Posts: 2043
Country: Australia

Normal tolerances would not be resovable by the sensor. You have an issue. The problem with observing so many bad copies (with poor tolerances or whatever) is that the maths quickly stacks up against you.

Say 1 in 10 Distagons is a dud (Which is very high). To get 4 is like 1 in 10 to the power 4, = 1 in 10000!

We can exclude bad batches as the lenses are across 2 manufacturers. Buyers of these lenses are experienced and demanding of their equipment, and if this was prevalent then it would be widely acknowledged by now.

Rather than claim Oly's are great and there is an issue with Zeiss / Canon QC as factually as you did, you need to study your equipment / technique to work out what is going wrong.

Mr Joe wrote:
Again, it's not a bad lens or a bad camera, it's the combination of a lens tolerance that's off one way, with a camera that's off the other way. Both can be within spec, and you still don't have a sharp picture. And my testing showed lenses that were off on the left side, and others that were off on the right side -- with the same body. Yet all of my Oly lenses worked fine with either body.



Mr Joe
Registered: May 18, 2004
Total Posts: 4314
Country: United States

@Skumar25 - This problem is reasonably prevalent and has been acknowledged by Roger Cicala's article linked above. He has more experience with more copies of lenses than anyone. The well known Lloyd Chambers of diglloyd has also acknowledged that this is a problem.

The lens in my blog post was obviously way off. Other samples were more subtle. As I said, I've tried multiple Canon and Zeiss wide angle lenses on multiple 5D Mark II bodies, and my experience is that adapted Olympus OM wide angle lenses are more consistently sharp across the frame than the lenses I've tried from Canon and Zeiss. Of course YMMV.

What I'm very curious to know, is if anyone has a theory why the Oly's are sharper for me. Is it something inherent in the design (size, element construction, distance to focal plane, etc.)?



SKumar25
Registered: May 18, 2006
Total Posts: 2043
Country: Australia

Mr Joe wrote:
@Skumar25 - This problem is reasonably prevalent and has been acknowledged by Roger Cicala's article linked above. He has more experience with more copies of lenses than anyone. The well known Lloyd Chambers of diglloyd has also acknowledged that this is a problem.

The lens in my blog post was obviously way off. Other samples were more subtle. As I said, I've tried multiple Canon and Zeiss wide angle lenses on multiple 5D Mark II bodies, and my experience is that adapted Olympus OM wide angle lenses are more consistently sharp across the frame than the lenses I've tried from Canon and Zeiss. Of course YMMV.

What I'm very curious to know, is if anyone has a theory why the Oly's are sharper for me. Is it something inherent in the design (size, element construction, distance to focal plane, etc.)?


Can you share your test samples?



Lars Johnsson
Registered: Jun 29, 2003
Total Posts: 33669
Country: Thailand

Sometimes alignment problems can have reasons in the lens mount also. It's more easy to stress the lens mount with heavy lenses like the Canon/Zeiss than the small Oly



jcolwell
Registered: Feb 10, 2005
Total Posts: 28228
Country: Canada

Mr Joe wrote:
What I'm very curious to know, is if anyone has a theory why the Oly's are sharper for me. Is it something inherent in the design (size, element construction, distance to focal plane, etc.)?


Were you born on a mountain? In Greece, perhaps?



Bifurcator
Registered: Oct 22, 2008
Total Posts: 9306
Country: Japan

I'm starting to think that FF cameras may not be the best way to go after all. On 4/3 for example and having tested over 400 lenses I only have seen 3 that exhibited corner softness and they were C-mount lenses! I bet APS-C shooters are having similar experiences. When corner softness happens to a noticeable degree it does indeed ruin the photograph.

If owning a FF camera means most of the interesting (on 4/3) WA and UWA lenses are no longer fun and interesting and that I have to buy a $6k 600mm APO to equal the reach of my current $0.8K 300mm APO then what did I ultimately end up with? A little better DR just doesn't seem worth all the sacrifices in all the other areas.

Is that wrong?



davidearls
Registered: Mar 09, 2006
Total Posts: 3918
Country: United States

Bifurcator wrote:
I'm starting to think that FF cameras may not be the best way to go after all. On 4/3 for example and having tested over 400 lenses I only have seen 3 that exhibited corner softness and they were C-mount lenses! I bet APS-C shooters are having similar experiences. When corner softness happens to a noticeable degree it does indeed ruin the photograph.

If owning a FF camera means most of the interesting (on 4/3) WA and UWA lenses are no longer fun and interesting and that I have to buy a $6k 600mm APO to equal the reach of my current $0.8K 300mm APO then what did I ultimately end up with? A little better DR just doesn't seem worth all the sacrifices in all the other areas.

Is that wrong?



I'd love to discuss this issue in a separate thread devoted to this issue instead of hijacking Kent's thread. I think it's the right question to be asking.



RustyBug
Registered: Feb 02, 2009
Total Posts: 17904
Country: United States

No worries, it's still about WA/UWA quality ... here or new thread, either way I'll chime in my .02.

BTW, David ... if I can hijack my own thread for a moment ... I just learned today that there will be an Ansel Adams exhibit in Mount Vernon, IL starting @ the end of February ... maybe you'll make it this way to see the exhibit. IIRC, it will include 60 or 70 prints, several that he personally made for his daughter from her personal collection.

Would be way cool if regional FM'ers came out to see it. I've let the museum know that I'd be willing to be a docent for the exhibit, but we'll see what happens with that. It'll be at the Mitchell Museum / Cedarhurst ... more info to come.

We now return you to your regular WA/UWA programming.



1       2      
3
       end