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  Previous versions of cgardner's message #11292098 « Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these? »

  

cgardner
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Re: Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these?


sbeme wrote:

But I wonder if successful wedding photographers and perhaps fashion photographers are on the more extroverted side. Certainly been my experience and it takes a certain comfort to sell, to pose others, to engage strangers for portrait, group shots and photoshoots.
Scott


When I worked for Zucker he did three-day master classes for other wedding pros. I observed the most successful ones attending were husband/wife teams with wife often being the extrovert/feeler handling the bookings, sales, people wrangling at the wedding, etc. Zucker was a husband / wife team. His wife Sandi, an introverted / thinking / sensing type handled the business side like a field marshal. He was an extreme extrovert/feeler type but with great intuition, a combination that made him great with people both when shooting and with marketing / sales.

Zucker lasted in the business over the long haul because his "batteries were charged" by dealing with people, making the big sale, writing columns and teaching; not by taking creative photos. That was like bricklaying different heads on the same poses for 40 years. He would have been equally happy and successful selling cars, clothing, etc. Some of the intuitive marketing and sales stuff he used was brilliant. His father ran a clothing store in DC and that "salesman / shopkeeper" temperament was hardwired in his DNA. He started taking photos for friends in high school who grew, got married and became doctors, lawyers and real estate tycoons. His fortunes grew with theirs via an extensive network of business and social contacts in a small niche market of affluent Jews in the DC area. Everyone automatically assumed I was a member of the tribe... a little Yiddish goes a long way

Running a one-person business well requires a range of temperaments and not many are balanced enough to be good at and enjoy all the tasks. Speaking from personal experience and observation I think what happens with a lot of photographers is they start off attracted to photography part and wind up hating the other 90% of running the business, getting burned-out and quitting after 5 years. Not necessarily creatively or because they weren't good at the business side, more often I think it's due to being introverted and not liking dealing with the people and selling.

Working for Zucker helped me see that about myself in about a year. That's when shooting weddings started to get repetitive and boring and I started looking for the next new opportunity to cross my path. He saved me the 5-10 year others I know spent building then bailing out of their own photography business. Five years years later I was a production manager at a magazine printer and starting to design database applications, moonlighting in the evening as a college instructor; enjoying those things much than working behind a camera because they better suited my temperament.



Jan 23, 2013 at 03:30 AM
cgardner
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Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these?


sbeme wrote:

But I wonder if successful wedding photographers and perhaps fashion photographers are on the more extroverted side. Certainly been my experience and it takes a certain comfort to sell, to pose others, to engage strangers for portrait, group shots and photoshoots.
Scott


When I worked for Zucker he did three-day master classes for other wedding pros. I observed the most successful ones attending were husband/wife teams with wife often being the extrovert/feeler handling the bookings, sales, people wrangling at the wedding, etc. Zucker was a husband / wife team. His wife Sandi, an introverted / thinking / sensing type handled the business side like a field marshal. He was an extreme extrovert/feeler type but with great intuition, a combination that made him great with people both when shooting and with marketing / sales.

Zucker lasted in the business over the long haul because his "batteries were charged" by dealing with people, making the big sale, writing columns and teaching; not by taking creative photos. That was like bricklaying different heads on the same poses for 40 years. He would have been equally happy and successful selling cars, clothing, etc. Some of the intuitive marketing and sales stuff he used was brilliant. His father ran a clothing store in DC and that "salesman / shopkeeper" temperament was hardwired in his DNA. He started taking photos for friends in high school who grew, got married and became doctors, lawyers and real estate tycoons. His fortunes grew with theirs via an extensive network of business and social contacts in a small niche market of affluent Jews in the DC area. Everyone automatically assumed I was a member of the tribe... a little Yiddish goes a long way

Running a one-person business well requires a range of temperaments and not many are balanced enough to be good at and enjoy all the tasks. Speaking from personal experience and observation I think what happens with a lot of photographers is they start off attracted to photography part and hating the other 90% of running the business, getting burned-out and quitting after 5 years. Not necessarily creatively or because they weren't good at the business side, more often I think it's due to being introverted and not liking dealing with the people and selling.

Working for Zucker helped me see that about myself in about a year. That's when shooting weddings started to get repetitive and boring and I started looking for the next new opportunity to cross my path. He saved me the 5-10 year others I know spent building then bailing out of their own photography business. Five years years later I was a production manager at a magazine printer and starting to design database applications, moonlighting in the evening as a college instructor; enjoying those things much than working behind a camera because they better suited my temperament.



Jan 23, 2013 at 03:28 AM
cgardner
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Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these?


sbeme wrote:

But I wonder if successful wedding photographers and perhaps fashion photographers are on the more extroverted side. Certainly been my experience and it takes a certain comfort to sell, to pose others, to engage strangers for portrait, group shots and photoshoots.
Scott


When I worked for Zucker he did three-day master classes for other wedding pros. I observed the most successful ones attending were husband/wife teams with wife often being the extrovert/feeler handling the bookings, sales, people wrangling at the wedding, etc. Zucker was a husband / wife team. His wife Sandi, an introverted / thinking / sensing type handled the business side like a field marshal. He was an extreme extrovert/feeler type but with great intuition, a combination that made him great with people both when shooting and with marketing / sales.

Zucker lasted in the business over the long haul because his "batteries were charged" by dealing with people, making the big sale, writing columns and teaching; not by taking creative photos. That was like bricklaying different heads on the same poses for 40 years. He would have been equally happy and successful selling cars, clothing, etc. Some of the intuitive marketing and sales stuff he used was brilliant. His father ran a clothing store in DC and that "salesman / shopkeeper" temperament was hardwired in his DNA. He started taking photos for friends in high school who grew, got married and became doctors, lawyers and real estate tycoons. His fortunes grew which theirs via an extensive network of business and social contacts in a small niche market of affluent Jews in the DC area. Everyone automatically assumed I was a member of the tribe... a little Yiddish goes a long way

Running a one-person business well requires a range of temperaments and not many are balanced enough to be good at and enjoy all the tasks. Speaking from personal experience and observation I think what happens with a lot of photographers is they start off attracted to photography part and hating the other 90% of running the business, getting burned-out and quitting after 5 years. Not necessarily creatively or because they weren't good at the business side, more often I think it's due to being introverted and not liking dealing with the people and selling.

Working for Zucker helped me see that about myself in about a year. That's when shooting weddings started to get repetitive and boring and I started looking for the next new opportunity to cross my path. He saved me the 5-10 year others I know spent building then bailing out of their own photography business. Five years years later I was a production manager at a magazine printer and starting to design database applications, moonlighting in the evening as a college instructor; enjoying those things much than working behind a camera because they better suited my temperament.



Jan 23, 2013 at 03:24 AM
cgardner
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these?


sbeme wrote:

But I wonder if successful wedding photographers and perhaps fashion photographers are on the more extroverted side. Certainly been my experience and it takes a certain comfort to sell, to pose others, to engage strangers for portrait, group shots and photoshoots.
Scott


When I worked for Zucker he did three-day master classes for other wedding pros. I observed the most successful ones attending were husband/wife teams with wife often being the extrovert/feeler handling the bookings, sales, people wrangling at the wedding, etc. Zucker was a husband / wife team. His wife Sandi, an introverted / thinking / sensing type handled the business side like a field marshal. He was an extreme extrovert/feeler type but with great intuition, a combination that made him great with people both when shooting and with marketing / sales.

Zucker lasted in the business over the long haul because his "batteries were charged" by dealing with people, making the big sale, writing columns and teaching; not by taking creative photos. That was like bricklaying different heads on the same poses for 40 years. He would have been equally happy and successful selling cars, clothing, etc. Some of the intuitive marketing and sales stuff he used was brilliant. His father ran a clothing store in DC and that "salesman / shopkeeper" temperament was hardwired in his DNA. He started taking photos for friends in high school who grew, got married and became doctors, lawyers and real estate tycoons. His fortunes grew which theirs via an extensive network of business and social contacts in a small niche market of affluent Jews in the DC area. Everyone automatically assumed I was a member of the tribe... a little Yiddish goes a long way

Running a one-person business well requires a range of temperaments and not many are balanced enough to be good at and enjoy all the tasks. Speaking from personal experience and observation I think what happens with a lot of photographers is they start off attracted to photography part and hating the other 90% of running the business, getting burned-out and quitting after 5 years. Not necessarily creatively or because they weren't good at the business side, more often I think it's due to being introverted and not liking dealing with the people and selling.

Working for Zucker helped me see that about myself in about a year. That's when shooting weddings started to get repetitive and boring for and I started looking for the next new opportunity to cross my path. He saved me the 5-10 year others I know spent building then bailing out of their own photography business. Five years years later I was a production manager at a magazine printer and starting to design database applications, moonlighting in the evening as a college instructor; enjoying those things much than working behind a camera because they better suited my temperament.



Jan 23, 2013 at 03:17 AM



  Previous versions of cgardner's message #11292098 « Texture comps. Are you lichen any of these? »