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RustyBug
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Upload & Sell: On
Re: Photography Tutorials


ben egbert wrote:
I have said too much. I get grouchy this time of year. Sorry.


No worries ... no blood, no foul.

Jim & Bob bring up good points as well regarding our Darwinian (I just "chose that word" to try and sound smart ) growth ... it is evolutionary in nature.

Also, if you ask a structural engineer, an architect, a carpenter and a construction worker how to build a house ... well, the degree of practical information at how to hammer a nail will differ from the vector forces associated with load bearing walls, which will be different from the working aesthetics of movement through the floor plan or the fine joinery of the cabinets and doors .... depending on which of them you ask.

Who's asking has as much bearing on the appropriateness of an answer as it does relative to who's answering. And, interestingly enough ... while the responses from the structural engineer, architect, carpenter and construction worker can be as far apart as the points on a compass ... they can still all be correct. While each may give an answer from their perspective, and it may be perfectly correct ... it can appear to be opposing or errant to those who are not cognizant of why it is correct.

Learning to expertly and efficiently drive a nail is a task that might be well learned from a seasoned practitioner of that task who has taken nail driving to an "art form" that is seemingly effortless and fluid. Learning how to layout a kitchen floor plan that will please a chef (or your better half) might be better served by the architect who knows how to facilitate those who desire to create works of culinary art.

The movement between hammer & nail or between chopping block and stove top are as integral to the crafts of construction and cooking as the movement of our (viewers) eyes throughout the images we make. Knowing how to "draw the eye" of our viewers through movement (see tenets above) is so much more than simply "do this" or "do that" ... but for those who do it very well, they make it look incredibly simple (i.e. like driving a nail or chopping an onion) and often state it as though it is so simple, when in fact it is a skill that they have developed through their diligent efforts to do so.

When starting out with a given craft, such as music ... we frequently get taught (initially) to only play the scale ... avoiding the flats & sharps as though they were somehow wrong. But for those who progress to the levels that would be considered "artful", they have come to understand how to not only use the flats & sharps, but to incorporate them in ways that they were never even taught.

Bob's recent Hitchcock / Adam's "tilt-a-church" kinda comes to mind for me. It goes against the grain/rules/guidelines in ways that many would strive to correct based on rudimentary perspective ... yet the relationship of those flats & sharps bring a harmony to it that is unusually delightful for some.

I've long espoused the philosophy of perspective (i.e. "What's the point?" or "What's the message that you are trying to convey to your viewer?") as begin a driving force for our practical application pursuits in our image making. Continuing to learn the plethora of ways to utilize the sounds (and rests) of music for auditory reception is as worthy as continuing on in the pursuit of visual image making.

Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. Teach a man how to fish, you feed him for a lifetime.
First we learn to emulate, then we learn to create.
Iron sharpens iron.


Camperjim wrote:I am curious: do you have a background in art or did you develop these ideas with experience?.

Well, I think I studied art once in Kindergarten ... and then once again in college.

Largely, it has been my own "gap analysis" of what constitutes the difference between "art" and "photography". Fundamentally, a visual image is a visual image ... irrespective of the medium. What makes the Mona Lisa or Starry Night "artful" in a compare/contrast with Moon Over Hernandez or Monolith. I've seen some "pen & ink" drawings that would just stop you dead in your tracks in utter amazement. Personally, I can't draw a stick man with a ruler ... so, I use a camera.





Dec 30, 2012 at 05:14 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Photography Tutorials


ben egbert wrote:
I have said too much. I get grouchy this time of year. Sorry.


No worries ... no blood, no foul.

Jim & Bob bring up good points as well regarding our Darwinian (I just "chose that word" to try and sound smart ) growth ... it is evolutionary in nature.

Also, if you ask a structural engineer, an architect, a carpenter and a construction worker how to build a house ... well, the degree of practical information at how to hammer a nail will differ from the vector forces associated with load bearing walls, which will be different from the working aesthetics of movement through the floor plan or the fine joinery of the cabinets and doors .... depending on which of them you ask.

Who's asking has as much bearing on the appropriateness of an answer as it does relative to who's answering. And, interestingly enough ... while the responses from the structural engineer, architect, carpenter and construction worker can be as far apart as the points on a compass ... they can still all be correct. While each may give an answer from their perspective, and it may be perfectly correct ... it can appear to be opposing or errant to those who are not cognizant of why it is correct.

Learning to expertly and efficiently drive a nail is a task that might be well learned from a seasoned practitioner of that task who has taken nail driving to an "art form" that is seemingly effortless and fluid. Learning how to layout a kitchen floor plan that will please a chef (or your better half) might be better served by the architect who knows how to facilitate those who desire to create works of culinary art.

The movement between hammer & nail or between chopping block and stove top are as integral to the crafts of construction and cooking as the movement of our (viewers) eyes throughout the images we make. Knowing how to "draw the eye" of our viewers through movement (see tenets above) is so much more than simply "do this" or "do that" ... but for those who do it very well, they make it look incredibly simple (i.e. like driving a nail or chopping an onion) and often state it as though it is so simple, when in fact it is a skill that they have developed through their diligent efforts to do so.

When starting out with a given craft, such as music ... we frequently get taught (initially) to only play the scale ... avoiding the flats & sharps as though they were somehow wrong. But for those who progress to the levels that would be considered "artful", they have come to understand how to not only use the flats & sharps, but to incorporate them in ways that they were never even taught.

Bob's recent Hitchcock / Adam's "tilt-a-church" kinda comes to mind for me. It goes against the grain/rules/guidelines in ways that many would strive to correct based on rudimentary perspective ... yet the relationship of those flats & sharps bring a harmony to it that is unusually delightful for some.

I've long espoused the philosophy of perspective (i.e. "What's the point?" or "What's the message that you are trying to convey to your viewer?") as begin a driving force for our practical application pursuits in our image making. Continuing to learn the plethora of ways to utilize the sounds (and rests) of music for auditory reception is as worthy as continuing on in the pursuit of visual image making.

Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. Teach a man how to fish, you feed him for a lifetime.
First we learn to emulate, then we learn to create.
Iron sharpens iron.





Dec 30, 2012 at 04:58 PM



  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #11227497 « Photography Tutorials »