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  Previous versions of michaelwatkins's message #11139612 « Sony RX1 FF Mirrorless (fixed lens) »

  

michaelwatkins
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Re: Sony RX1 FF Mirrorless (fixed lens)


millsart wrote:
I think the RX1 needs to be thought of as a P&S camera


My first reaction is to bounce back: If the RX1 is a point and shoot then so is the GXR/M.

My second thought is... to ask you: Why?

Because it has no built in viewfinder? That's actually incorrect, the camera ships with one built-in finder - the high resolution, use-in-bright sunlight capable, high-tech ground glass called a LCD screen. More accurately put, the RX1 has one finder and two optional finders. Many may not find the rear LCD acceptable as a finder, but it is in fact a finder.

There are tons of finder implementations. I won't bother linking in view cameras with ground glass (a reasonable analogue to the rear LCD finder in such cameras) but how about some other portable small cameras? How is the RX1 with the optional optical viewfinder different than this folding camera?






It has a simple spring loaded piece of glass and metal that pops up, offers inaccurate framing, no focus confirmation, no information whatsoever. The camera has a fixed lens.

Is this Zeiss Ikon viewfinder (and all such manual controlled viewfinder cameras) a point and shoot?


The RX1 has one finder and two optional finder types.
The X100 has three finders - integrated optical and electronic, and the rear live view "ground glass".
The M9 in contrast with no live view capability in contrast has one integrated finder as the rear screen can't be used for focus and composition.






Same question for all integrated viewfinder and rangefinder cameras? The former is an aiming mechanism only - you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder. The latter is an aiming an focusing mechanism and again you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder or with one attached.

Because it is a fixed lens camera? Are any of the following fixed lens cameras "point and shoot" cameras?


I have a few of these, but need to take my own photos of them I see! (Thanks Rockycameras.com for letting me, uh, borrow it)






Yashica 35

In my mind this is a point and shoot camera:


Canon PowerShot A1300 - no aperture or shutter priority, no manual settings. Fully automatic point and shoot.

... as is this:







... as is this:







These are not point and shoot cameras

Leica V-Lux 30 - full control over exposure if you want it.

Nor is this:

Leica Minilux - full control over exposure if you want it, tortured process though it may be.

Nor this:
[.img]
Ricoh GXR /M with Summicron 50 mounted

Nor this:

Sony RX1

IMO a point and shoot camera is one designed for fully automatic operation and nothing but.

A flexible camera - call it a serious photographic tool if you want - can often be configured to act like a point and shoot camera, but the reverse is not true.



Nov 24, 2012 at 12:37 AM
michaelwatkins
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Re: Sony RX1 FF Mirrorless (fixed lens)


millsart wrote:
I think the RX1 needs to be thought of as a P&S camera


My first reaction is to bounce back: If the RX1 is a point and shoot then so is the GXR/M.

My second thought is... to ask you: Why?

Because it has no built in viewfinder? That's actually incorrect, the camera ships with one built-in finder - the high resolution, use-in-bright sunlight capable, high-tech ground glass called a LCD screen. More accurately put, the RX1 has one finder and two optional finders. Many may not find the rear LCD acceptable as a finder, but it is in fact a finder.

There are tons of finder implementations. I won't bother linking in view cameras with ground glass but how about some other portable small cameras? How is the RX1 with the optional optical viewfinder different than this folding camera?






Is this viewfinder Kodak a point and shoot? If not, then how is the RX1 with an optical finder mounted in the hot shoe a point and shoot?

The RX1 has one finder and two optional finder types.
The X100 has three finders - integrated optical and electronic, and the rear live view "ground glass".
The M9 in contrast with no live view capability in contrast has one integrated finder as the rear screen can't be used for focus and composition.






Same question for all integrated viewfinder and rangefinder cameras? The former is an aiming mechanism only - you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder. The latter is an aiming an focusing mechanism and again you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder or with one attached.

Because it is a fixed lens camera? Are any of the following fixed lens cameras "point and shoot" cameras?


I have a few of these, but need to take my own photos of them I see! (Thanks Rockycameras.com for letting me, uh, borrow it)






Yashica 35

In my mind this is a point and shoot camera:


Canon PowerShot A1300 - no aperture or shutter priority, no manual settings. Fully automatic point and shoot.

... as is this:







But this is not:

Leica V-Lux 30 - full control over exposure if you want it.

Nor is this:

Leica Minilux - full control over exposure if you want it, tortured process though it may be.

Nor this:
[.img]
Ricoh GXR /M with Summicron 50 mounted

Nor this:

Sony RX1

IMO a point and shoot camera is one designed for fully automatic operation and nothing but.

A flexible camera - call it a serious photographic tool if you want - can often be configured to act like a point and shoot camera, but the reverse is not true.



Nov 24, 2012 at 12:30 AM
michaelwatkins
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Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Sony RX1 FF Mirrorless (fixed lens)


millsart wrote:
I think the RX1 needs to be thought of as a P&S camera


My first reaction is to bounce back: If the RX1 is a point and shoot then so is the GXR/M.

My second thought is... to ask you: Why?

Because it has no built in viewfinder? That's actually incorrect, the camera ships with one built-in finder - the high resolution, use-in-bright sunlight capable, high-tech ground glass called a LCD screen. More accurately put, the RX1 has one finder and two optional finders. Many may not find the rear LCD acceptable as a finder, but it is in fact a finder.

There are tons of finder implementations. I won't bother linking in view cameras with ground glass but how about some other portable small cameras? How is the RX1 with the optional optical viewfinder different than this folding camera?






Is this viewfinder Kodak a point and shoot? If not, then how is the RX1 with an optical finder mounted in the hot shoe a point and shoot?

The RX1 has one finder and two optional finder types.
The X100 has three finders - integrated optical and electronic, and the rear live view "ground glass".
The M9 in contrast with no live view capability in contrast has one integrated finder as the rear screen can't be used for focus and composition.






Same question for all integrated viewfinder and rangefinder cameras? The former is an aiming mechanism only - you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder. The latter is an aiming an focusing mechanism and again you can do that with the RX1 with no external finder or with one attached.

Because it is a fixed lens camera? Are any of the following fixed lens cameras "point and shoot" cameras?









In my mind this is a point and shoot camera:


Canon PowerShot A1300 - no aperture or shutter priority, no manual settings. Fully automatic point and shoot.

... as is this:







But this is not:

Leica V-Lux 30 - full control over exposure if you want it

Nor is this:

Leica Minilux - full control over exposure if you want it,

Nor this:
?v=1839[.img]

Nor this:


IMO a point and shoot camera is one designed for fully automatic operation and nothing but.

A flexible camera - call it a serious photographic tool if you want - can often be configured to act like a point and shoot camera, but the reverse is not true.



Nov 24, 2012 at 12:23 AM



  Previous versions of michaelwatkins's message #11139612 « Sony RX1 FF Mirrorless (fixed lens) »