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  Previous versions of Kaden K.'s message #11076046 « Opalotypes and Orotones »

  

Kaden K.
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Upload & Sell: Off
Opalotypes and Orotones


I loved it. I think it has a wider range of light to dark than platinum and it is more archival
as well and it also has better definition than many other processes. It really looks great
as a result and even in the old days carbon prints were more expensive than platinum
prints.

Needless to say it also has its potential difficulties that are process related. It is also a
very precise process when it comes to timing and portions, and how to, etc.

I learned to make my own carbon tissues from scratch giving me the advantage of not
being limited to what is available on the market (meager choices). I liked both the transfer
to fixed gelatin paper and glass. Both can work for different projects.

This is a great addition to making glass negatives (wet and dry). I ma also open in the
future to learn to make the old Kodak dry plate gelatin which is faster than the collodiob
dry plates and studying at GEH I can have access to an ex-Kodak engineer who knows
about the process.

The glass plates obviously can be used to print in carbon. Including doing double printing
with different colors.

Btw, the orotones are extremely rare still nowadays and fetch high prices in the market.

I had the opportunity of seeing originals from the 1800's and they were amazingly good.
My favorite photographer was by far Thomas Annan. I got to see several of his original
prints. I saw also some incredible carbron prints and some rare addictive and subtractive
color prints dating back to the very beginning of photography. Including a French 3 color
print that was the very first color print. Impressive when one has access to the original
life.

My next adventure is learning pre-daguerrean processes such as physautotype. This is
the process that let to daguerreotypes and can be done in glass and silver plates and
looks pretty much like a daguerreotype even though it is done with resin and lavender
and developed with turpentine.



Oct 29, 2012 at 05:38 AM
Kaden K.
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Opalotypes and Orotones


I loved it. I think it has a wider range of light to dark than platinum and it is more archival
as well and it also has better definition than many other processes. It really looks great
as a result.

Needless to say it also has its potential difficulties that are process related. It is also a
very precise process when it comes to timing and portions, and how to, etc.

I learned to make my own carbon tissues from scratch giving me the advantage of not
being limited to what is available on the market (meager choices). I liked both the transfer
to fixed gelatin paper and glass. Both can work for different projects.

This is a great addition to making glass negatives (wet and dry). I ma also open in the
future to learn to make the old Kodak dry plate gelatin which is faster than the collodiob
dry plates and studying at GEH I can have access to an ex-Kodak engineer who knows
about the process.

The glass plates obviously can be used to print in carbon. Including doing double printing
with different colors.

Btw, the orotones are extremely rare still nowadays and fetch high prices in the market.

I had the opportunity of seeing originals from the 1800's and they were amazingly good.
My favorite photographer was by far Thomas Annan. I got to see several of his original
prints. I saw also some incredible carbron prints and some rare addictive and subtractive
color prints dating back to the very beginning of photography. Including a French 3 color
print that was the very first color print. Impressive when one has access to the original life.

My next adventure is learning pre-daguerrean processes such as physautotype. This being
the process that let to daguerreotypes and can be done in glass and silver plates and looks
pretty much like a daguerreotype even though it is done with resin and lavender and developed
with turpentine.



Oct 29, 2012 at 05:31 AM



  Previous versions of Kaden K.'s message #11076046 « Opalotypes and Orotones »