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  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #11042553 « Head Shot Tests - Hurley style »

  

RustyBug
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Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject ... see next thread.


On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...


"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good (even if the agency accepts them) ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and ...well, you get the point. The agency is only the middle man, not the decision maker @ getting your boys some $$$. It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:28 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject ... see next thread.


On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good (even if the agency accepts them) ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and ...well, you get the point. The agency is only the middle man, not the decision maker @ getting your boys some $$$. It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:28 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject ... see next thread.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good (even if the agency accepts them) ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and ...well, you get the point. The agency is only the middle man, not the decision maker @ getting your boys some $$$. It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:28 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good (even if the agency accepts them) ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and ...well, you get the point. The agency is only the middle man, not the decision maker @ getting your boys some $$$. It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:27 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and .... It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:24 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and .... It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal. Both are worthy endeavors ... but they are not one in the same.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:23 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to globally correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and .... It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:20 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS and PASS and PASS and .... It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal.





Oct 15, 2012 at 02:19 PM
RustyBug
Online
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Head Shot Tests - Hurley style


dmacmillan wrote:
You are also mixing light sources and you'll never get a good skin tone with mixed lighting.

To be honest you have neither the equipment nor the knowledge to do a proper job.


Doug is spot on here with the above two points ...

The first is regarding the technical issue that you are using mixed lighting that is not possible to correct for one area without effecting the other area in a non-corrective manner. In this regard, it requires selective correction techniques, and with the convex/concave shapes of the face, the range of reflective angles presented in mixed lighting scenarios renders it very difficult to do such corrections properly. Far better to be certain of using consistent lighting color for your subject.

On the second point ... not to be critical of your efforts to learn and grow ... we are all very strong advocates of that around here, but, there's an old adage ...

"When you NEED a doctor, get a GOOD one. When you NEED a lawyer, get a GOOD one."


The same can be said for plumber, electrician, mechanic ... and yes photographer. So, when you NEED a photographer, get a GOOD one. Doug's point is that if a person truly NEEDS good head shots, then they should get a photographer who is GOOD at shooting head shots.

Head shots seem like such a simple thing ... but the ultra-critical eye of good agencies can spot the difference between a professional head shot and an amateur production (no matter the style emulated) that "gets by" from a country mile. A "not so good" agency might accept your images, as they may not be as as scrutinizing ... but realize that the head shots won't be seen by just the agency ... but also by prospective clients, AD, etc.

If your headshots aren't good ... people may not say squat, but they will PASS. It has been made known to be folly for a person to represent themselves in court when facing serious charges. DIY headshots are the same thing ... you are trying to represent yourself rather than getting a professional that knows his way around the industry (i.e. courtroom by which you will be judged) to advocate for you.

So ... if your objective is to obtain headshots for your son that will advance his career, that is a different thing from embarking on the journey to learn how to produce good head shots. You need to be crystal clear with yourself which objective it is that is your goal.





Oct 15, 2012 at 01:55 PM



  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #11042553 « Head Shot Tests - Hurley style »