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  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #10942473 « Model/Prop release Apps. »

  

RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Model/Prop release Apps.


Dennis ... I feel your pain @ asking.

Having suffered through similar times ... I'll take a stab with .02

I think it comes down to when you are in the EMT role ... you feel like you are doing something FOR THEM. When you are in the photographer role, you feel like you are doing something FOR YOU ... and assume that there isn't any reason for them to go along with it because you assume they won't see anything in it FOR THEM.

For some people, they will only go along with it if they can see something in it FOR THEM. But there are still others, who (like you as an EMT) will do it out without great concern for themselves ... willing to do it "FOR YOU".

It's that feeling that you believe that you are "putting them out" that restricts you from asking. When I was a recruiter (long ago) it was very difficult for me to ask, until I came to realize that I had something of value to offer them, that UNTIL I ASKED I wouldn't know what valuation they perceived. Sure, it often times required some additional explanation to get them to understand what / why @ an issue.

But, I think the point here is that you are trying to carry the onus of their perception in your assumptions that they "won't want to" ... whereas when performing EMT duties, it is pretty clear that they "would want" you to. It is the uncertainty that is debilitating for some.

You simply need to practice getting rejected enough, in such a way that you come to realize, it isn't the end of the world or uber critical if someone says "no". It isn't even the end of the story on the "first no". Handling rejection ... and objection handling (two very different things) are learned skills. As an EMT ... you experienced very little objection or rejection ... easy to proceed.

Objection (which precedes) and rejection aren't something to be "avoided" ... but rather understood. If you'll ask yourself (in advance) what a person's objections might be (i.e. fear of being plastered all over the internet), then you can prepare yourself to answer that (maybe in your release). You can even ask the person directly what objections they might have if when they first say "no" ... and then alleviating their concerns accordingly.

You won't win them all over ... but I'd suggest studying / practicing the art of "objection handling" ... and then preparing accordingly. It's a learned thing ... but smart enough for a 3.9 GPA ... smart enough to learn "objection handling".

Also ... to help with YOUR mindset, and help convey that to others ... I'll remind myself that I'm "on assignment" whether that be as assigned by myself or working for someone else. As in the case of being "on assignment" for the orchard. It can help transform it from the "for you" to "for others" mentality that is probably conditioned a bit from your EMT experience and training.

HTH ... GL



Sep 07, 2012 at 08:39 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Model/Prop release Apps.


Dennis ... I feel you pain @ asking.

Having suffered through similar times ... I'll take a stab with .02

I think it comes down to when you are in the EMT role ... you feel like you are doing something FOR THEM. When you are in the photographer role, you feel like you are doing something FOR YOU ... and assume that there isn't any reason for them to go along with it because you assume they won't see anything in it FOR THEM.

For some people, they will only go along with it if they can see something in it FOR THEM. But there are still others, who (like you as an EMT) will do it out without great concern for themselves ... willing to do it "FOR YOU".

It's that feeling that you believe that you are "putting them out" that restricts you from asking. When I was a recruiter (long ago) it was very difficult for me to ask, until I came to realize that I had something of value to offer them, that UNTIL I ASKED I wouldn't know what valuation they perceived. Sure, it often times required some additional explanation to get them to understand what / why @ an issue.

But, I think the point here is that you are trying to carry the onus of their perception in your assumptions that they "won't want to" ... whereas when performing EMT duties, it is pretty clear that they "would want" you to. It is the uncertainty that is debilitating for some.

You simply need to practice getting rejected enough, in such a way that you come to realize, it isn't the end of the world or uber critical if someone says "no". It isn't even the end of the story on the "first no". Handling rejection ... and objection handling (two very different things) are learned skills. As an EMT ... you experienced very little objection or rejection ... easy to proceed.

Objection (which precedes) and rejection aren't something to be "avoided" ... but rather understood. If you'll ask yourself (in advance) what a person's objections might be (i.e. fear of being plastered all over the internet), then you can prepare yourself to answer that (maybe in your release). You can even ask the person directly what objections they might have if when they first say "no" ... and then alleviating their concerns accordingly.

You won't win them all over ... but I'd suggest studying / practicing the art of "objection handling" ... and then preparing accordingly. It's a learned thing ... but smart enough for a 3.9 GPA ... smart enough to learn "objection handling".

Also ... to help with YOUR mindset, and help convey that to others ... I'll remind myself that I'm "on assignment" whether that be as assigned by myself or working for someone else. As in the case of being "on assignment" for the orchard. It can help transform it from the "for you" to "for others" mentality that is probably conditioned a bit from your EMT experience and training.

HTH ... GL



Sep 07, 2012 at 05:14 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Model/Prop release Apps.


Dennis ... I feel you pain @ asking.

Having suffered through similar times ... I'll take a stab with .02

I think it comes down to when you are in the EMT role ... you feel like you are doing something FOR THEM. When you are in the photographer role, you feel like you are doing something FOR YOU ... and assume that there isn't any reason for them to go along with it because you assume they won't see anything in it FOR THEM.

For some people, they will only go along with it if they can see something in it FOR THEM. But there are still others, who (like you as an EMT) will do it out without great concern for themselves ... willing to do it "FOR YOU".

It's that feeling that you believe that you are "putting them out" that restricts you from asking. When I was a recruiter (long ago) it was very difficult for me to ask, until I came to realize that I had something of value to offer them, that UNTIL I ASKED I wouldn't know what valuation they perceived. Sure, it often times required some additional explanation to get them to understand what / why @ an issue.

But, I think the point here is that you are trying to carry the onus of their perception in your assumptions that they "won't want to" ... whereas when performing EMT duties, it is pretty clear that they "would want" you to. It is the uncertainty that is debilitating for some.

You simply need to practice getting rejected enough, in such a way that you come to realize, it isn't the end of the world or uber critical if someone says "no". It isn't even the end of the story on the "first no". Handling rejection ... and objection handling (two very different things) are learned skills. As an EMT ... you experienced very little objection or rejection ... easy to proceed.

Objection (which precedes) and rejection aren't something to be "avoided" ... but rather understood. If you'll ask yourself (in advance) what a person's objections might be (i.e. fear of being plastered all over the internet), then you can prepare yourself to answer that (maybe in your release). You can even ask the person directly what objections they might have ... and then alleviating their concerns accordingly.

You won't win them all over ... but I'd suggest studying / practicing the art of "objection handling" ... and then preparing accordingly. It's a learned thing ... but smart enough for a 3.9 GPA ... smart enough to learn "objection handling".

Also ... to help with YOUR mindset, and help convey that to others ... I'll remind myself that I'm "on assignment" whether that be as assigned by myself or working for someone else. As in the case of being "on assignment" for the orchard. It can help transform it from the "for you" to "for others" mentality that is probably conditioned a bit from your EMT experience and training.

HTH ... GL



Sep 07, 2012 at 05:12 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Model/Prop release Apps.


Dennis ... I feel you pain @ asking.

Having suffered through similar times ... I'll take a stab with .02

I think it comes down to when you are in the EMT role ... you feel like you are doing something FOR THEM. When you are in the photographer role, you feel like you are doing something FOR YOU ... and assume that there isn't any reason for them to go along with it because you assume they won't see anything in it FOR THEM.

For some people, they will only go along with it if they can see something in it FOR THEM. But there are still others, who (like you as an EMT) will do it out without great concern for themselves ... willing to do it "FOR YOU".

It's that feeling that you believe that you are "putting them out" that restricts you from asking. When I was a recruiter (long ago) it was very difficult for me to ask, until I came to realize that I had something of value to offer them, that UNTIL I ASKED I wouldn't know what valuation they perceived. Sure, it often times required some additional explanation to get them to understand what / why @ an issue.

But, I think the point here is that you are trying to carry the onus of their perception in your assumptions that they "won't want to" ... whereas when performing EMT duties, it is pretty clear that they "would want" you to. It is the uncertainty that is debilitating for some.

You simply need to practice getting rejected enough, in such a way that you come to realize, it isn't the end of the world or uber critical if someone says "no". It isn't even the end of the story on the "first no". Handling rejection ... and objection handling (two very different things) are learned skills. As an EMT ... you experienced very little objection or rejection ... easy to proceed.

Objection (which precedes) and rejection aren't something to be "avoided" ... but rather understood. If you'll ask yourself (in advance) what a person's objections might be (i.e. fear of being plastered all over the internet), then you can prepare yourself to answer that (maybe in your release). You can even ask the person directly what objections they might have ... and then alleviating their concerns accordingly.

You won't win them all over ... but I'd suggest studying / practicing the art of "objection handling" ... and then preparing accordingly. It's a learned thing ... but smart enough for a 3.9 GPA ... smart enough to learn "objection handling".

HTH ... GL



Sep 07, 2012 at 05:07 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Model/Prop release Apps.


Dennis ... I feel you pain @ asking.

Having suffered through similar times ... I'll take a stab with .02

I think it comes down to when you are in the EMT role ... you feel like you are doing something FOR THEM. When you are in the photographer role, you feel like you are doing something FOR YOU ... and assume that there isn't any reason for them to go along with it because you assume they won't see anything in it FOR THEM.

For some people, they will only go along with it if they can see something in it FOR THEM. But there are still others, who (like you as an EMT) will do it out without great concern for themselves ... willing to do it "FOR YOU".

It's that feeling that you believe that you are "putting them out" that restricts you from asking. When I was a recruiter (long ago) it was very difficult for me to ask, until I came to realize that I had something of value to offer them, that UNTIL I ASKED I wouldn't know what valuation they perceived. Sure, it often times required some additional explanation to get them to understand what / why @ an issue.

But, I think the point here is that you are trying to carry the onus of their perception in your assumptions that they "won't want to" ... whereas when performing EMT duties, it is pretty clear that the "would want" you to. It is the uncertainty that is debilitating.

You simply need to practice getting rejected enough, in such a way that you come to realize, it isn't the end of the world or uber critical if someone says "no". It isn't even the end of the story on the "first no". Handling rejection ... and objection handling (two very different things) are learned skills. As an EMT ... you experienced very little objection or rejection ... easy to proceed.

Objection (which precedes) and rejection aren't something to be "avoided" ... but rather understood. If you'll ask yourself (in advance) what a person's objections might be (i.e. fear of being plastered all over the internet), then you can prepare yourself to answer that (maybe in your release). You can even ask the person directly what objections they might have ... and then alleviating their concerns accordingly.

You won't win them all over ... but I'd suggest studying / practicing the art of "objection handling" ... and then preparing accordingly. It's a learned thing ... but smart enough for a 3.9 GPA ... smart enough to learn "objection handling".

HTH ... GL



Sep 07, 2012 at 05:05 PM



  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #10942473 « Model/Prop release Apps. »