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  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #10330997 « Winter Formal Photoshoot »

  

RustyBug
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Re: Winter Formal Photoshoot


While I'm not certain that the "white shirt" is neutral ... we can deduce that we are working in mixed lighting because all four of the selected points on the shirt would read very similar (color balance) if they were in the same light.

Here we have point #1 with equal amounts of blue & green (i.e. cyan/opposite of red) as dominant and #2 with equal amounts of red & green (i.e. yellow/opposite of blue) as the lesser. As such, one area is dominant in cyan, the other dominant in blue. While each are influenced with proportional amounts of two of the three colors, the difference between cyan and blue is telling.

Moving to #3 & #4, we have no proportional relationships between the individual RGB channels, so our color cast is different from the cast of either #1 or #2 ... #3 & #4 do appear to be correlated to each other reasonaly well (+/- appx 80). Having three different colors for the SAME (whether it is actually white or not doesn't matter) color of shirt confirms that we are dealing with mixed lighting.

In that regard, there isn't going to be a single "correct" WB for the scene. As you "pull" one area, you'll be "pushing" another. Decisions have to be made as to which one is going to be favored as "correct", or if "split the difference" is going to be adopted.

All that being said, to suggest that it is going to be an issue of compromise (or a lot of selective corrections) and personal subjectivity.

For those who have been around, this is certainly not the first time I've spoken to this, but the young man's shirt clearly shows the effect of mixed lighting in both highlight and shadow ... as well as overlapping areas. I was limited to picking four (PS) areas for display comparison, but exploring more areas of the SAME shirt (i.e. SAME color) serve to further illustrate the inconsistency of the lighting temperature, i.e. mixed lighting.

Correct vs. pleasing is always a decision / choice to be contended with, but when evaluating and subsequently seeing things that you "don't like" ... understand to what degree it may be a "necesary" push/pull compromise ... and why it became necessary to have such a compromise oriented scenario.

BTW ... nice capture @ expressions (which can override technicals). However, she may not like having blue or magneta/purple highlights in her hair ... i.e. something to watch for from the original.

Subjectively, you wanted to take the image warm for and that is certainly fine and probably helps mitigate the need for such analysis. I simply have shared this as it is my "starting point" for assessing any image that I am going to begin work on ... i.e. understand the lighting conditions. I probably made a "mountain out of a mole hill" for most people, but I found this one to be a very clear (to me at least) illustration of the issue ... whether or not you concern yourself iwth it is a subjective decision, but just something to be aware of (or not).

HTH ... again, nice capture @ emotive.




Feb 10, 2012 at 03:30 PM
RustyBug
Offline
Upload & Sell: On
Re: Winter Formal Photoshoot


While I'm not certain that the "white shirt" is neutral ... we can deduce that we are working in mixed lighting because all four of the selected points on the shirt would read the same if they were in the same light.

Here we have point #1 with equal amounts of blue & green (i.e. cyan/opposite of red) as dominant and #2 with equal amounts of red & green (i.e. yellow/opposite of blue) as the lesser. As such, one area is dominant in cyan, the other dominant in blue. While each are influenced with proportional amounts of two of the three colors, the difference between cyan and blue is telling.

Moving to #3 & #4, we have no proportional relationships between the individual RGB channels, so our color cast is different from the cast of either #1 or #2 ... #3 & #4 do appear to be correlated to each other reasonaly well (+/- appx 80). Having three different colors for the SAME (whether it is actually white or not doesn't matter) color of shirt confirms that we are dealing with mixed lighting.

In that regard, there isn't going to be a single "correct" WB for the scene. As you "pull" one area, you'll be "pushing" another. Decisions have to be made as to which one is going to be favored as "correct", or if "split the difference" is going to be adopted.

All that being said, to suggest that it is going to be an issue of compromise (or a lot of selective corrections) and personal subjectivity.

For those who have been around, this is certainly not the first time I've spoken to this, but the young man's shirt clearly shows the effect of mixed lighting in both highlight and shadow ... as well as overlapping areas. I was limited to picking four (PS) areas for display comparison, but exploring more areas of the SAME shirt (i.e. SAME color) serve to further illustrate the inconsistency of the lighting temperature, i.e. mixed lighting.

Correct vs. pleasing is always a decision / choice to be contended with, but when evaluating and subsequently seeing things that you "don't like" ... understand to what degree it may be a "necesary" push/pull compromise ... and why it became necessary to have such a compromise oriented scenario.

BTW ... nice capture @ expressions (which can override technicals). However, she may not like having blue or magneta/purple highlights in her hair ... i.e. something to watch for from the original.

Subjectively, you wanted to take the image warm for and that is certainly fine and probably helps mitigate the need for such analysis. I simply have shared this as it is my "starting point" for assessing any image that I am going to begin work on ... i.e. understand the lighting conditions. I probably made a "mountain out of a mole hill" for most people, but I found this one to be a very clear (to me at least) illustration of the issue ... whether or not you concern yourself iwth it is a subjective decision, but just something to be aware of (or not).

HTH ... again, nice capture @ emotive.




Feb 10, 2012 at 01:33 PM



  Previous versions of RustyBug's message #10330997 « Winter Formal Photoshoot »