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Archive 2013 · Eizo monitor question
  
 
Candrews9
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Eizo monitor question


I am looking to upgrade my primary monitor. Here's the background.

I shoot lots of street portraits and print them at 20x30 and 18x24 primarily. They go into exhibits of 50 to 100 at a time, and I use Costco or Elco Color now for printing usually. I am now building a portfolio of nudes for gallery sales, and I have no experience in fine art printing.

I work 95% in Lightroom with a primary monitor to show the final shot by itself and a secondary monitor for working with files and doing things like local adjustments in LR. My primary monitor is a Viewsonic with a 1200 x 1600 resolution. I keep it reasonably tuned with an xrite device. I am generally pleased with the results I get, judging primarily by whether the output matches a gen 4 iPad.

I plan to move my ViewSonic to be the secondary file and local adjustment monitor and get a new Eizo for the finished photo look. I suffer a lot from eye strain, and I am hoping getting rid of my consumer file monitor will help with that.

I am starting my path towards learning printmaking, and want to set myself up well with the monitor. I am looking at Eizo because it appears to be reputable, and if I start bringing other devices into the mix, I will have a huge analysis paralysis moment.

On B&H, a top dog is the CG246-BK 24" Widescreen LED Backlit LCD Monitor with Integrated Measurement Device ($2,289). The best seller is ColorEdge CG223W 22" Widescreen LCD Display ($1,120).

So here are my questions:

The most serious approach seems to be the $2,000+ Eizos, using 10 bit graphic cards. I am capable in Photoshop, but I much prefer staying in LR for ease/speed of workflow, so 10 bit appears to be overkill. Is that correct?

What are the big differences between the $2,250 Eizos and the more popular $1,120 one. Will it matter to me if I stay 8-bit?

I am a PC guy with a decent Radeon graphics card. When I look at the 10-bit cards for the Eizo, the prices start at $500 and go way up from there. Will a different graphics card than the one I have make a significant difference in image quality? Why?

There is a pretty vibrant photo club scene here in Nashville, which I have never looked into. Should I join up and try to get advice and see/evaulate peoples' monitors locally, or can I get what I need without going in that direction yet?

What questions should I be asking that I am not? Unsolicited input is welcome.

Thank you for your help with so many naive questions.



May 22, 2013 at 02:26 PM
howardm4
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Eizo monitor question


look long and hard at the NEC PA241W or PA271W


May 22, 2013 at 06:32 PM
Cphoto1954
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Eizo monitor question


After doing a ton of research here is the one I got (below). It will most likely meet ALL your needs as a photographer. Price is $799.00 delivierd to your door from B&H.

Good color bit depth too (if you feel you need it) with the proper video card. But more color bit depth may be more than we need in the real world of websites or in printed photos.

Eizo Flexcsan 22"

Great review here too by one of the best photographers around: Will Crocket

Good luck with your decision!




May 22, 2013 at 06:37 PM
Mescalamba
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Eizo monitor question


With 10-bits you are most likely kinda wasting your money.

I have Eizo and I love it. Never going to buy something else..

But, 10-bits in age where 99% of photos is on web.

If you going to print and really care about quality than Im not sure about 10-bit, just get something which has at least 95% aRGB coverage. Keep in mind that really good printer and inks (and paper) is quite expensive. Yea and color profiling device for LCD and printer is good idea too (pretty much mandatory). And for really good printing, you need third-party software (checking Luminous Landscape articles about printing is good idea).

It sorta piles up, so decide "how much" you want it to be good and how much you want to invest.



May 22, 2013 at 06:39 PM
Mescalamba
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Eizo monitor question


Cphoto1954 wrote:
After doing a ton of research here is the one I got (below). It will most likely meet ALL your needs as a photographer. Price is $799.00 delivierd to your door from B&H.

Good color bit depth too (if you feel you need it) with the proper video card. But more color bit depth may be more than we need in the real world of websites or in printed photos.

Eizo Flexcsan 22"

Great review here too by one of the best photographers around: Will Crocket

Good luck with your decision!



Seems good I would say. 95% aRGB is nice And DUE helps a lot.



May 22, 2013 at 06:41 PM
mshi
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Eizo monitor question


this thing has everything you ask for and inexpensive too:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/769647-REG/ASUS_PA246Q_PA246Q_24_1_Widescreen_LCD.html



May 22, 2013 at 07:33 PM
 

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rico
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Eizo monitor question


Candrews9 wrote:
The most serious approach seems to be the $2,000+ Eizos, using 10 bit graphic cards. I am capable in Photoshop, but I much prefer staying in LR for ease/speed of workflow, so 10 bit appears to be overkill. Is that correct?

What are the big differences between the $2,250 Eizos and the more popular $1,120 one. Will it matter to me if I stay 8-bit?

I am a PC guy with a decent Radeon graphics card. When I look at the 10-bit cards for the Eizo, the prices start at $500 and go way up from there. Will a different graphics
...Show more

20-year Eizo junkie speaking. Recently upgraded to the FlexScan SX2762W, and have been outrageously pleased. It's essentially a ColorEdge without a few accessories (hood, integrated colorimeter), and with a lower price. The aRGB gamut and 10 bits/channel features are discernible, and very desirable for post IMO. The capable cards are not that expensive - in my case, Nvidia Quadro 600 for $150 plus DisplayPort cable - and you're set for future possibilities.

Ref:
http://www.eizo.com/global/products/flexscan/sx2762w/



May 23, 2013 at 12:28 AM
Mescalamba
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Eizo monitor question


Eizo junkie - nice description. Fully understand you..


May 23, 2013 at 02:42 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Eizo monitor question


Candrews9 wrote:
I am capable in Photoshop, but I much prefer staying in LR for ease/speed of workflow, so 10 bit appears to be overkill. Is that correct?

I'm not sure. Does it follow that Lr cannot utilise a 10-bit monitor ?

Will it matter to me if I stay 8-bit?

Lr edits in 16-bit and a very wide colour gamut. Some printers, such as the Canon iPF large format series will also take 16-bit files for printing. Therefore I can't see how it would hurt to use a 10-bit screen. That is not to say that it is essential - lets face it, many nice prints are produced with 8-bit sRGB jpeg images but there will no doubt be some that could have been handled better with more bits in the data and on the screen.

There is a pretty vibrant photo club scene here in Nashville, which I have never looked into. Should I join up and try to get advice and see/evaulate peoples' monitors locally, or can I get what I need without going in that direction yet?

There's heaps to be learned from participation in a good camera club, but that does not mean they will have experience with Eizo monitors, nor that they will bring them to the club for you to see.

One thing that mention a lot these days is that if you have ageing eyes and need to use fixed-prescription reading glasses to view a monitor clearly (unlikely in your case) then your viewing distance will be relatively fixed and you should check out a monitor to see if the pixel size is too big. I find that 90ppi is too coarse, 110 ppi is borderline, 132ppi is good, and 264ppi is wonderful (iPad, etc.). Most of the up-market monitors are in the 89-110ppi range, with my Eizo having 89. I was quite happy with them until I need to wear glasses all the time. You might want to consider a smaller monitor to get the higher ppi from the same pixel count, or a bigger monitor with higher ppi from a higher pixel count.

Also, check out the colour gamut charts for the monitors. Having 95% of aRGB sounds good and 97% or 98% sounds marginally better but in practice while they miss out on displaying a few percent of aRGB they can display a whole lot of stuff that is outside aRGB and not considered part of the 100% aRGB - especially into the rich reds and greens. Good photo printers can do that too, as can good cameras, so the capability in a monitor to show those extra colours is not wasted.

You will also benefit from a monitor that has 10 or more bits per colour channel internally even if it does only display 8 bits per channel - not because you will see them all but because it allows the monitor in-built lookup table and processor to more finely control the gradients of colours that you do see and also helps to provide more uniform brightness and tone across the whole screen. This can be a big improvement on lesser monitors. Another advantage is that it allows the monitor to do all of the colour profile management independently of the graphics card. In that case the profile that you apply is really just a do-nothing profile for the graphics card while the real work is done within the monitor.

- Alan



May 23, 2013 at 01:58 PM
aubsxc
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Eizo monitor question


Here's my opinion: if you cannot define a specific need for a monitor that actually displays 10-bit colors per channel, you very likely do not need such a monitor. An 8-bit display describes the tonal range using 256 steps, while a 10-bit display uses 1024 steps. Do you typically work with images which have large areas of very similar color with very slight variations in tone, it is important to you that you can accurately view these gradations as smoothly as possible on your monitor, and you can see consistently and accurately banding on your screen using 8-bit color? If yes, than a 10-bit display would help. If not, it is not worth the price you pay.


May 23, 2013 at 04:31 PM
Candrews9
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Eizo monitor question


Is DisplayPort any better than DVI if I don't go 10-bit?


May 23, 2013 at 08:34 PM
rico
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Eizo monitor question


Candrews9 wrote:
Is DisplayPort any better than DVI if I don't go 10-bit?

No. My new Eizo has three video inputs: DVI-D (dual link), DisplayPort, and mini DisplayPort. Other than cable stiffness and connector latching mechanism, they are equivalent. I slightly prefer the D connector and thumbscrews of DVI, but DisplayPort gets better vendor support for 10-bit.



May 23, 2013 at 10:23 PM





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