Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       3       end
  

Which portrait lens for 5DIII?
  
 
badlydrawnboy
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


I'm having trouble deciding on a portrait lens. I currently have two lenses: the 24-70 II and the 50L. I love them both and they've been a fantastic two-lens kit for what I shoot, which is almost exclusively my 22-month old daughter. (I used to do a lot of street/fine art stuff but I just don't have time for that right now and won't for the foreseeable future.)

Most important criteria are IQ, bokeh and AF speed/consistency. Price is a factor but not the main one. I'm only considering Canon lenses at this point; I know Sigma makes great optics but I've had too many focus issues in the past and I'm not up for trying again.

Here are the lenses I'm considering with my thoughts. I'd love to hear your recommendation.

— 85L: I owned this in the past, and it was one of my favorite lenses ever. But it's more than I want to spend now, and I'm concerned that 85mm isn't enough of a jump up from 70mm (the long end of my 24-70)—especially considering the price. (The 85L isn't known for its AF speed, but I found it was fast enough with my 5DIII.)

—85/1.8: I've tried 2-3 copies of this lens in the past, but I've always been underwhelmed. I know it's very popular, but it didn't do much for me.

—100/2.8 L IS: I have no use for macro, but this lens is so highly rated that I'm considering it. It meets all of my criteria, but my one hesitation is I'd like something a little faster (for indoor use and more subject isolation). There's a $150 rebate on this lens now which is another bonus.

—100/2: I used to own this lens when I had a 5D, and I liked it quite a bit. The price is right, too.

—135/2: I owned this as well years ago and it was probably the most impressive lens I've ever used. Unfortunately, I think it's too long for my needs.

I'm not considering the 70-200, as good as it is, because I prefer primes to zooms in general and because I dislike large, heavy lenses.

What do you think? I'm particularly interested in hearing from people who use the 100L for portraiture. Have you found the f/2.8 to be fast enough for portrait use, even indoors?



Apr 27, 2013 at 03:08 PM
fixedgearmike
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


Just saying, but I absolutely love my sigma 85 1.4. Its near as dammit as good as my 135 f2, I'd heard about the focus issues with sigma but got lucky (twice actually, i've got a 35 too). Its in a different league to the canon 85 1.8 which is good but, like you, I found a bit underwhelming.

I use the sigma in preference to my 24-70 mk1, I love the DOF control and extra stops indoors.



Apr 27, 2013 at 03:19 PM
dhphoto
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


I would use a 100 f2 personally.

It's twice the length of your 50L so a nice differentiation, it's sharp wide open and cheap.

Most of the time I use that or my 70-200l f4 IS which is just as sharp at f4 and a lot more versatile, plus the IS is fantastic



Apr 27, 2013 at 03:52 PM
docsmiles17
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


I bought the 100L for macro use but was playing around with it on portraits one day and was really impressed. I dont have any hesitation to photograph portraits with it. I use it on 5diii so if need, i can bump the ISO for indoor and IS helps. Its lightweight and have been very happy with this combo.


Apr 27, 2013 at 05:17 PM
docsmiles17
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


badlydrawnboy wrote:
—100/2.8 L IS: I have no use for macro, but this lens is so highly rated that I'm considering it. It meets all of my criteria, but my one hesitation is I'd like something a little faster (for indoor use and more subject isolation). There's a $150 rebate on this lens now which is another bonus.



What do you mean by "more subject isolation".



Apr 27, 2013 at 05:29 PM
robbymack
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


It's hard to beat the 85 1.8 or 100 2 for price and performance. If I was going to spend 100L money and I didn't do macro I'd just get the 135L.


Apr 27, 2013 at 05:41 PM
kezeka
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


The 85 1.8 is basically an 85L with significantly faster AF, stopped down, and with slightly less pretty bokeh/color/contrast. The 100/2 is essentially the same lens design as the 85/1.8 if I remember correctly - just 15mm longer.

I find the 85L to be fast enough to keep up with most things on a 1D body, slightly slower on my 5D2 but it never misses focus. Just requires anticipating the slight delay in focusing in order to capture a moment.

I don't have experience with the 100 2.8 but if you want subject isolation 2.8 isn't going to cut it when the foreground is only a foot away from the background (crawling or even walking child while you are taking photos from 5' above them) but that is just my experience photographing kids with a 70-200 2.8 so YMMV.

It sounds like you are leaning towards the 100/2 so go pick one up and give it a try. I am jealous that your 50L behaves itself!



Apr 27, 2013 at 06:01 PM
gpop
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #8 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


price, size and the f2 make the 100/2 very attractive.
if you want crazy sharp either of the 100/2.8 macros will deliver.
I find the 100/2 plenty sharp for casual portrait use.



Apr 27, 2013 at 06:01 PM
lhdvries
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #9 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


I love my 85/1.8, 100/2 & 135/2L & my 24-70/2.8 L II takes care of any other needs I encounter in that FL area.

Leon



Apr 27, 2013 at 06:23 PM
badlydrawnboy
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #10 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


robbymack wrote:
It's hard to beat the 85 1.8 or 100 2 for price and performance. If I was going to spend 100L money and I didn't do macro I'd just get the 135L.


I guess the one advantage of the 100L even though I don't shoot macro is the close focusing distance. This would allow for a perspective that I couldn't otherwise get with a 100mm lens.



Apr 27, 2013 at 06:23 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Eyvind Ness
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


badlydrawnboy wrote:
I guess the one advantage of the 100L even though I don't shoot macro is the close focusing distance. This would allow for a perspective that I couldn't otherwise get with a 100mm lens.


Exactly. With the 100L you do not need to worry about MFD (which is 0.9m on the 100/2 - I would find that rather limiting, YMMV). Also, the 100L has a brilliant IS implementation, useful for general shooting. AF is extremely fast for a macro, and keeps up well for general shooting.

I love the rendering and it is one of my most used lenses, and I also own the 85L, 90 TS-E, 135L, and the Sigma 150mm f2.8, in this range.



Apr 27, 2013 at 06:35 PM
StillFingerz
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #12 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


For price it's the 100 f2 or the 85 f1.8, the 100 f2 is a really sweet/sharp lens and the filter thread is metal. The 85 f1.8 is faster AF wise and a bit sharper wide open. With either of these lenses there will be variation, best to test before you buy if possible.

For versatility, hands down it's the 100L IS. I've used the non-L for over 10yrs and found it sharp and with fairly fast AF. But the new 100L, while not much if any sharper, it's balanced great and the IS makes it a joy to hand-hold. Bokeh is not as smooth as the 180L or the 135L but it's quite nice.

Below is TDP's review of the 100L, about 2/3rds down the review there are three images of a purple flower taken with the 180, 100 and 60, check out the bokeh to see if the 100L will meet your needs...

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L IS USM Macro Lens Review
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-100mm-f-2.8-L-IS-USM-Macro-Lens-Review.aspx

I do like the 100L a lot...I don't leave home without it...was the extra $400 for the IS worth it...yep
However, if you really like smooth buttery bokeh, the 85L or 135L are the better choice; the 135L has quite fast AF and it's price point is a bit lower then than the 100L.

Whatever you choose...show us some images...pleeze!
Jerry

Edited on Apr 27, 2013 at 07:22 PM · View previous versions



Apr 27, 2013 at 07:13 PM
rabbitmountain
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


The 100L macro is a fine lens. And I see you're leaning towards it. So I say go for it. Question that remains is whether or not you can afford to buy a lens for a sole purpose. As good as the 100L is, IQ is not much more suitable for shooting portraits than the 70-200/2.8. And I know you don't want it as you stated above. But I just want to share that I use my 70-200/2.8 (mkII version) for many many types of shooting, including portraits, weddings, sports, landscape, animals and architecture. It's a swiss army knife of lenses. I don't need to buy a separate portrait lens, a separate sports lens, etc. you know where I'm going.

Just wanted to mention this before you hit that order button

Stay good,

Ralph



Apr 27, 2013 at 07:20 PM
Monito
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #14 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


badlydrawnboy wrote:
I'm having trouble deciding on a portrait lens.


Be very careful to think and define what you mean, but also be careful about overthinking. If you are looking for a head and shoulders portrait lens, that is rather well defined. But "portrait lens" is anything from 24 mm to 300 mm and even those limits are exceeded in a few cases. That is because portraits are anything from a full-length figure at the side of a frame to a tight crop in on just eyes.

Note also that beauty / glamour work benefits from distances about 50% greater than regular portrait work and thus the focal lengths used for the same angle of view are about 50% greater.

Just what are you looking for?

To get a perspective that gives you a "friendly" sense of intimacy you need a distance that makes the 85 mm the classic focal length on full-frame for head and shoulders. 70 or 100 mm is similar enough that if you like those lenses, don't worry about it. Maintain that distance but vary the focal length to get different croppings (like three-quarter length portrait or a head-only photo).

Regarding f/2.8, once again, you need to define what you mean by "portrait". Do you mean casual candid snaps without flash? Then get a fast focusing fast lens. If you mean well-executed intimate portraits suitable for printing large (11x14 for example), then you have time to use a tripod or to setup good lighting (turning on room lights and/or using window light) or to use flash even if it is only strategic bounce flash.

With forethought and practice, you can coax a subject into a pleasing pose and expression that can look every bit as candid as a snap and have much better lighting.

Don't overthink the lens: Get something you like, regardless of what other people say. Do think deeply about lighting and posing and rapport.

With regard to specifics, the 24-70 II and 50 L are great lenses, as you say. That you would be "underwhelmed" by the 85 1.8 is perhaps over-stated, but your lenses are in a class that you can afford the 85 1.2 if you like.

If your primary purpose is baby pictures of your 22 month old daughter, then I would look very deeply into your aversion against zoom lenses (what the heck are you doing with a 24-70 then?) and "big heavy lenses" so you can consider the 70-200 L lenses with IS and be fair to yourself.

When people complain about "big heavy lenses" of the 70-200 f/2.8 type, I say to myself, yeah, "heavier" but "deal with it". If quality photography were easy everyone could do it. (Think carefully about what goal you are really reaching for.) The weight of a 70-200 f/2.8 is really not much of a barrier to 99% of people when you think objectively about it. Yes, we would like it to weigh like a 40 mm f/2.8, but it's a lens (plus camera) and not as heavy as a weed-eater or chain saw that people use all day long.

The 70-200 f/4 IS is very good and lighter and the IS is very good for indoors. It in combination with ISO 1250 or 2000 on the 5D3 will give you excellent results. In your situation that is what I would get or splurge on the 2.8 IS II.

Regarding f/2.8 or f/4 or f/2 for indoor lighting (presumably meaning dim 100 watt incandescent lighting): I used to shoot 35mm film for 8x10s at ISO 400 (ASA 400) at f/2 and 1/30 sec carefully. These days ISO 1600 is so good on the 5D3 you can shoot carefully at f/2.8 and 1/60 in dim light and make gorgeous 16x24 prints (twice as large linearly with the same amount of camera motion blur). You can shoot at ISO 2500 and f/3.5 and 1/80 with a little less care and still make stunning 11 x 17 inch prints. With IS you can do even more.

One of the keys is to compose so that the shadow detail is unimportant and then make them darker in post-processing. Compose for the light.

In the final analysis, I think you should get the 100 mm f/2. Read what you wrote about it: you like it and can afford it. Get it and up your game in other areas.



Apr 27, 2013 at 07:47 PM
Kathy White
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #15 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


My 100 L is my second choice for portraits and only because I like the 70 200 2.8II so much for them. It is crazy sharp and I use it much more frequently for portraits than I do as a macro. But got that version because I want a macro available when I need it. I personally would go for either the 100L or 135L.


Apr 27, 2013 at 08:35 PM
jamato8
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #16 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


The non L 100 macro is very good, a great price and as sharp as you could ever want for a portrait lens.


Apr 27, 2013 at 08:41 PM
deepbluejh
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #17 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


My vote goes toward the 100/2. Excellent lens and will get you more reach than anything you have now.

Sure, the 100/2.8 IS L might be a tad better optically, but for 2-1/2 times the price of the 100/2, it just doesn't make much sense unless you need macro.



Apr 27, 2013 at 10:16 PM
badlydrawnboy
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #18 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


deepbluejh wrote:
My vote goes toward the 100/2. Excellent lens and will get you more reach than anything you have now.

Sure, the 100/2.8 IS L might be a tad better optically, but for 2-1/2 times the price of the 100/2, it just doesn't make much sense unless you need macro.


Good point. But actually, right now because of the rebates the 100L is less than 2x the price of the 100/2. At B&H the 100L is $869, and the 100/2 is $449.

Price is of course a consideration, but my bigger concern is the difference between f/2 and f/2.8. I have the 24-70/2.8, and with primes I usually appreciate a faster aperture than what I can get in a zoom. On the other hand, I do like the idea of a shorter MFD with the 100L even though I don't plan to use macro.

I might have to rent them both to figure it out.



Apr 27, 2013 at 10:21 PM
alexdi
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #19 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


I voted with my wallet for the 100/2. Three times, actually. If it's suppose to be a portrait lens foremost, forget the macro. You'll miss the extra stop.

I don't think the 85/1.8 or the 100/2 is perfect. Sharpness is pretty decent, but contrast is lower than I'd like and colors are a bit dull. You can compensate for both fairly well in ACR.



Apr 27, 2013 at 10:46 PM
maxx9photo
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #20 · Which portrait lens for 5DIII?


Sigma 85/1.4


Apr 27, 2013 at 11:02 PM
1
       2       3       end




FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       3       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password