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Archive 2013 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question
  
 
rockant
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p.3 #1 · p.3 #1 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


While I will not presume to know what gear to take, I can help you take it.

After numerous International flights, Indonesia and the Middle East, I found that by wearing photo vest or jacket with large pockets is the answer. If they challenge the weight of your bag you sling one body with your 70-200 around you neck and stuff what ever else is needed into your pockets. How much you and what you are wearing does not matter.

Of course you can put it back in the bag when you get around the corner. For Jordan I had 5D mkII, 7D, 17-40, 24-105. 100-400, 85 1.4, 580EX II, and batteries and charges in my FStop Loka. Along with 2 shirts, pants, etc.

I will admit that most of the time a did not use the long end of the 100-400, and may have gotten by with a 70-200.



Jan 19, 2013 at 12:22 AM
goldscout
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p.3 #2 · p.3 #2 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Spent two weeks doing Bhutan end to end. Its people, landscapes and architecture. 70-200 is the max you'll need. this gallery may give you some idea of what you'll see to photograph.


Jan 19, 2013 at 04:57 AM
Ulan
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p.3 #3 · p.3 #3 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


goldscout wrote:
Spent two weeks doing Bhutan end to end. Its people, landscapes and architecture. 70-200 is the max you'll need. this gallery may give you some idea of what you'll see to photograph.


Nice portraits, Goldscout.



Jan 19, 2013 at 10:21 AM
Jeff Nolten
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p.3 #4 · p.3 #4 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Thanks Paul, I'm looking forward to experimenting with the 20-35, it seems a good supplement to the 24-105 and its a group A lens on the 5D3 It will probably need extension for close shots.

Thanks David and Goldscout, I've been using G series for backpacking for years and the G1X IQ is so good I don't feel I'm sacrificing if it grabs the image instead of the 5D. On our Greek trip last year they really complemented one another. From Goldscout's great gallery it looks like I'll be using the 70-200 quite a bit for street and the G1X can provide the backup wide range.

Thanks Rockant, I've thought about a vest. My light field jacket has large cargo pockets which I'll press into service if necessary. Always good to have contingency plans.

I think there is a wealth of information and ideas here, thanks everyone. For future search use, here is my current list of gear for the trip:

Carry-on:
5D3, 20-35 f2.8, 25-105 f4 IS, 70-200 f4 IS, iPad : 8.5 lbs in my pack.
G1X + polarizer + close-up lens, SD850 P&S, small binoculars, iPad : 4.5 lbs in my wife's pack.
Plus spare clothes, meds, head lamp, cell phones, & etc.

Packed luggage: We each use a usually carry-on legal size rolling suitcase. 40 lb. limit but we'll probably be around 30 lbs each.
Gitzo 1058 tripod with RRS BH25 < 2 lbs.
RRS PCL Pano head and rail for panoramas 1 lb.
Stoney Point walking stick with lens support 1/2 lb.
270EX flash 1/3 lb.
1.4x teleconverter + 12 & 20 mm extension 3/4 lb.
remote release cables, memory cards, 3 batteries each, chargers, cleaning kit < 2 lb.
underwater housing for SD850 3/4 lb.
Plus clothing, first aid kit, swiss army knife, etc. Lots of Patagonia and Railriders nylon and fleece, etc.



Jan 19, 2013 at 07:51 PM
goldscout
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p.3 #5 · p.3 #5 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


I was asked about the people in Bhutan. In a word very accepting and friendly. You need to have a guide who speaks the language, but even when wandering city streets on my own in the morning or around temple grounds, I almost never had someone say no if you held your camera up and smiled at them. Very friendly and cooperative if you were. Access inside required your guides intervention, but no problems on the street. No one with a handout for money when you took their picture.......
The food however is a different matter. Take candy bars aplenty.



Jan 19, 2013 at 08:46 PM
 

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Jeff Nolten
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p.3 #6 · p.3 #6 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Thanks Goldscout, that is very encouraging. I've always been a bit shy about photographing people I haven't been introduced to. I'm sure our trip will be well supplied with guides. My wife always takes pencils & etc. to hand out to kids, I'll take some candy bars as well.


Jan 19, 2013 at 09:27 PM
Michael White
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p.3 #7 · p.3 #7 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Put what weight you can in a vest or jacket as that doesn't count as carry on. Have a bag( me a backpack) all my gear travel/ stores in think tank pouches that later fit on my belt I also have a unique pouch from Lowepro that allows me to swap out two lens back and forth. And I have some Tarmac pouches that I got when I got in to digital. This allows me to pack gear in the backpack but wear it when needed I bought a travel smith vest years ago and the pockets are Huge and once through the carry on nazis I repack the carry on with what will fit then put the vest in storage for the flight.

And if you want you can wrap your gear with your clothes done that before.



Jan 20, 2013 at 06:10 AM
rockant
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p.3 #8 · p.3 #8 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Quick recommendation: Batteries in carry-on, lithum batteries are not permitted in checked luggage. Also, memory cards and charge I would carry-on too, since you cannot shoot without them.

I always consider "Carry-On" as what do I need to carry on with my trip. Cameras, Meds, enough clothes to get until I can get others. If I am checking a bag my dob kit (bathroom supplies) gets checked. I can find soap, but may not be able to get the right batteries and charger.

Have fun.

Jeff Nolten wrote:
Carry-on:
5D3, 20-35 f2.8, 25-105 f4 IS, 70-200 f4 IS, iPad : 8.5 lbs in my pack.
G1X + polarizer + close-up lens, SD850 P&S, small binoculars, iPad : 4.5 lbs in my wife's pack.
Plus spare clothes, meds, head lamp, cell phones, & etc.

Packed luggage: We each use a usually carry-on legal size rolling suitcase. 40 lb. limit but we'll probably be around 30 lbs each.
Gitzo 1058 tripod with RRS BH25 < 2 lbs.
RRS PCL Pano head and rail for panoramas 1 lb.
Stoney Point walking stick with lens support 1/2 lb.
270EX flash 1/3 lb.
1.4x teleconverter + 12 & 20 mm extension
...Show more



Jan 31, 2013 at 12:43 AM
rdcny
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p.3 #9 · p.3 #9 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Travel light...if doing landscapes the 24-105 is pretty much all you will need - you can shoot wide panos with it (hand-held) easily...people images, etc. People are really good about having their photo taken in Nepal...so you can get up close and ask them or just shoot.

Power right now (mid-December to late February) until the rainy season begins is awful - about 8 hrs per day in Kathmandu...and there is no heat anywhere - so in January night time temps in hotels (the ones priced in the $10-$20 range) are 0c or 30-32f. I have friends (research colleagues) who sit and type at the computer wearing full winter gear at this time of the year (including fingerless gloves)

http://photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=1021128

is a portfolio of mostly raptors in flight (I do bird migration studies there) with landscapes and people too - I suggest traveling light; if trekking you might need a porter (Nepal) but I would forego the guide - too much expense and many need more training (or info); yes it is good to employ locals but...a guide may end up being more of an intrusion on your trip...the trekking trails are so well known and so many people on them...you won't get lost.

Has anyone mentioned anything about leeches? If going in spring be aware they are there and looking for you even now...

I have not had a problem with giardia in my several seasons in Nepal...you might consider Ciproflaxin or similar in case you get some bad food (has not happened to me yet)...Nepal is pretty good at handling trekkers...

Travel light is my best advice - and try not to take too many long distance buses - the roads are awful - I have been east to west and north to south...a bus ride can ruin a day...and leave you aggravated for hours afterwards.

Namaste' and the Nepalese people, especially in the mountains, are wonderful.

Do bring warm warm clothes for nights...

I know nothing of Bhutan

rdc



Jan 31, 2013 at 02:25 AM
Jeff Nolten
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p.3 #10 · p.3 #10 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Thanks Rdcny, I'll be on a tour with Over Seas Adventure Travel so I have little control over the wheres, whens, and hows, but I appreciate your advice and be as prepared as possible. I will keep my camera kit down to a manageable size that I've used before.

Since you've been there doiing bird studies, do you think it worth while to take my 100-400 instead of the 70-200 for possible wildlife photography? Doesn't exactly meet your travel light requirements.

Rockant: I'll be bringing 3 batteries for my camera. I can probably go over a week without recharge that way. Thanks.



Jan 31, 2013 at 02:44 AM
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