Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
  

Archive 2013 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip
  
 
gdanmitchell
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I prefer to not use a grip. Most people rarely, if ever, shoot enough at once to run down a battery in a full day. In normal shooting most DSLR batteries today will get you many, many hundreds of shots and might even get you close to 1000 shots per charge. When it comes to weight and bulk - things that matter to me - a separate battery wins over a grip. In fact, several extra batteries win.

One reason for using a grip is the supposed advantage of having the shutter release in the same location whether you shoot in landscape or portrait mode. However, if you are switching between these two modes frequently, I would argue that the grip is less efficient. When I rotate 90%, I keep my finger on the shutter button the whole time. It is completely second nature to shoot this way, and there is no need to reposition at all. On the other hand, if you rotate with the grip and want to use the other shutter release button, you must not only rotate the camera but also move your hand to a new position on the body. The former is faster than the latter.

If you shoot from the tripod, you'll use a remote release, so that the extra shutter release is irrelevant. Here using a L-bracket and a quick release tripod head will be faster and more accurate.

Some think that adding a grip makes the camera/grip package look bigger and more pro. However, if this is your goal - looking more "pro" to other photographers - adding a grip might actually have precisely the opposite effect in that there is a certain type of poseur who is often seen using the grip. (Not everyone who uses one is a poseur, and not everyone cares...)

Dan

alhajri wrote:
Hello everyone,

I'm going out for some camera gear shopping tonight. I wanted to get an extra Canon LP-E6 battery for my Canon 7D and the ND filter from the other post we talked in.

I'll charge this battery and have it in my camera bag as backup when I run out of battery charge. Which brought the question, why would one buy the battery grip? as opposed to having a backup battery? The only thing that comes to mind, is to have a continuous power for a long video recording without interruption, or set the camera to auto take photos over
...Show more


Edited on Jan 15, 2013 at 06:27 AM · View previous versions



Jan 14, 2013 at 08:16 PM
Gunzorro
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


Kal -- There is also the issue of extended battery life when using a battery grip and two batteries. They run at the same time, not in series (at least this has been my experience with four cameras). So you don't have too many batteries floating around -- most assignments or days shooting will be done on the two batteries in the grip.

I have large hands, and often shoot heavy lenses like 24-70L and 28-300L. The extra grip length is essential for helping hold the camera/lens up.

The added weight of the grip plus two batteries adds more stability (inertia) for hand held work.

I either shoot a 1D-series with built in grip, or add a grip to a T2i through 5D2.




Jan 14, 2013 at 08:23 PM
Todd Klassy
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I can't shoot without the battery grip any longer. I have become so accustomed to the feel of it when shooting. It feels so much better with my large hands. A battery grip also means I don't have to recharge my batteries quite so frequently. Oh, and it is nice to have the extra juice on board when shooting long exposure shots outside in the winter.


Jan 14, 2013 at 10:46 PM
msalvetti
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


Grip here. I'm often out all day on a hot tarmac or race track with the 100-400 or 70-200 f/2.8. Even though the grip adds weight to this heavy rig, overall I like having the bottom half of may hand against it, and I think I can pan better.

The other thing I love about a grip is that with a handstrap, I can easily hold the camera/lens securely in one hand hanging at my side in rest mode. I find this more comfortable than hanging it off my neck, even with an OpTech strap.

I also think that the grip drains both batteries equally. So I only keep one battery in it, and the other charged battery as a spare. At an airshow I might fill up 64GB in CF cards and use up one fully charged battery. Over more normal use I don't get anywhere near that many shots on one battery, but I still get plenty, and I like knowing I always have a fully charged battery backup.

I'm far less likely to forget the extra battery than find myself with two nearly dead batteries in the grip and no spare.

Mark



Jan 14, 2013 at 11:09 PM
ggreene
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


Monito wrote:
The issue of "balance" is often cited and is completely bogus. You can, without a battery grip, perfectly balance any camera+lens combination that you can heft (lift). Do it like this:


Not bogus, just subjective. On my 10D (with or without the grip) the 70-200 f4 felt like a matched set. On my 1D2 it felt awkward no matter how I held it. When I upgraded to a 70-200 2.8 it had much better balance and was a lot more comfortable to use.



Jan 15, 2013 at 02:41 AM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


ggreene wrote:
Not bogus, just subjective. On my 10D (with or without the grip) the 70-200 f4 felt like a matched set. On my 1D2 it felt awkward no matter how I held it. When I upgraded to a 70-200 2.8 it had much better balance and was a lot more comfortable to use.


Were you holding them (A) the way I explained (and you cut out) or (B) by holding the camera at both sides or (C) the way the woman in the photograph was holding it with left hand holding the lens at the side with fingers curling above the lens?


Edited on Jan 15, 2013 at 03:21 AM · View previous versions



Jan 15, 2013 at 02:51 AM
scottam10
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I'm in the 'no grip' camp. I often carry my camera when hiking, and I don't like the extra size and weight. I'd need a bigger bag to carry camera+grip; I'd rather just carry a spare battery.

Also when I put the camera down on a flat surface it flops forward onto its nose

There is a benefit in having the juice from 2 batteries for long exposures especially if it's cold.
- also if you use 2 bodies, a grip can help the camera sit on the strap more nicely (flat against your side rather than nose-down without a grip)

Worth trying one in the shop to see if you like it



Jan 15, 2013 at 03:13 AM
pony girl
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


If you do use a grip, have you been happy with an "off brand" one, or is the official Canon one more reliable/better/worth the extra price?


Jan 15, 2013 at 02:44 PM
rebelshooter
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I shoot a 7D with the Canon grip. I tried an off brand (don't remember which) to save a few bucks but was not happy with the build and fit so returned it for the BGE7. And contrary to what Monito will tell you, it will balance better especially if you hand hold a larger lens. Largest I have now is the 70-200 2.8MkII but will be adding another soon and although I can shoot fine without the grip, it just feels more comfortable with the grip on.
Personal preference, yes, but a preference none the less.



Jan 15, 2013 at 03:00 PM
gdanmitchell
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


rebelshooter wrote:
And contrary to what Monito will tell you, it will balance better especially if you hand hold a larger lens. Largest I have now is the 70-200 2.8MkII but will be adding another soon and although I can shoot fine without the grip, it just feels more comfortable with the grip on.


I often shoot a 5D2 with the 100-400, and I cannot see any "balance" advantage that would result from making my camera heavier. In an ideal world, I can imagine a magical camera that was so small as to be weightless and which (in my fantasy) would allow me to make photographs with only the lens. There would be no "balance issue" - it would be just like looking through a spotting scope.

While this is, indeed, subjective, I think that the balance argument doesn't really hold up if you think about it.

YMMV.

Dan


Edited on Jan 15, 2013 at 07:39 PM · View previous versions



Jan 15, 2013 at 03:05 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



sleepy717
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I also have grips on all my bodies. I also run two batteries. I recharge my batteries whenever I know I'll be shooting anything important (and I carry extras). I, also, have large hands and having a grip feels better to me. I will take the grip off when I'm using a long lens (400+) on a tripod to save a little weight. I prefer Canon grips but have an aftermarket grip on one of my bodies with no problems with any of them.


Jan 15, 2013 at 03:10 PM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


rebelshooter wrote:
And contrary to what Monito will tell you, it will balance better especially if you hand hold a larger lens. Largest I have now is the 70-200 2.8MkII but will be adding another soon and although I can shoot fine without the grip, it just feels more comfortable with the grip on. Personal preference, yes, but a preference none the less.


Are you holding the combo (A) the way I explained in a previous post upthread or (B) by holding the camera at both sides or (C) the way the woman in the photograph was holding it with left hand holding the lens at the side with fingers curling above the lens?

gdanmitchell wrote:
I often shoot a 5D2 with the 100-400, and I cannot see any "balance" advantage that would result from making my camera heavier. In an ideal world, I can imagine a magical camera that was so small as to be weightless and which (in my fantasy) would allow me to make photographs with only the lens. There would be no "balance issue" - it would be just like looking through a spotting scope. While this is, indeed, subjective, I think that the balance argument doesn't really hold up in you think about it.


+1. I too often shoot with the 5D2 and 100-400 or 100-400 + 1.4x. Sometimes carrying the combo for miles. It all depends on good stance and holding it in a logical ergonomic way (not holding the camera with two hands).

A photographer can hold that combo in essentially the same way they can hold a camera + 40mm pancake combo and both combos can be well balanced with all the controls easily accessible.

There is a reason Canon puts lens controls where they do on the lens and it has to do with a high functioning stance and hold.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:04 PM
rebelshooter
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I hold it the way you described. It is the way I have always held a camera since day one, I think I held my P&S that way too.
To me it simply balances better, I carry it all day long and have no issues. I have used the lens on my wife's XTi and my daughters T3 and my 7D without the grip. The rebels feel very awkward and even the 7D without the grip does not feel as good to me.
To me the combo balances better with the grip, obviously that is not the case with you. But to say that it is bogus or doesn't hold water is inaccurate. It is a very subjective thing much that will be up to the individual to decide. I shoot with many others that share my preference for using a grip with the longer lenses for balance.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:11 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


If I am shooting landscapes, majority off of a tripod, I leave the grip behind. However, if I am shooting an event or sports where I take a lot of portrait oriented shots, the grip DOES help both balance the camera and more importantly, feels more comfortable for ME when shooting in portrait orientation.

It has nothing to do with looking like a PRO or having an extra battery. It is all about comfort for me. Bottom line, if a grip feels more comfortable, use it.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:19 PM
ISO1600
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I think more people buy the grips for the additional grip and vertical controls, vs additional battery capacity.
I know if i want a bigger camera with better controls, I'll just pony up for a 1-series.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:20 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


ISO1600 wrote:
I think more people buy the grips for the additional grip and vertical controls, vs additional battery capacity.
I know if i want a bigger camera with better controls, I'll just pony up for a 1-series.


Yep, 1dx at $6799 and 5D3 at $3499. I am sure most people will pony up to a 1-series just for the better controls. The grip, especially the latest ones, fit the camera quite nicely and are a fraction of the price of a 1-series upgrade.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:25 PM
ISO1600
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


I never said, and it doesn't have to be inferred, that I have to get a 1DX.

If the grip was ever so important to me as to require it, I know I'd rather have a 1DSII than a 5DII, as an example... Honestly, if I didn't care about video, and I wanted to shoot Canon, the 1DSII is what I'd be shooting. 1 series build and controls are so much better IMO than the XXD and XD bodies.



Jan 15, 2013 at 04:40 PM
firstgear99
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


See next comment


Jan 15, 2013 at 06:12 PM
firstgear99
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


Monito wrote:
No wonder. She hasn't learned to hold a camera properly.

I know that you are all wise, but how do you hold a camera when you are adjusting the zoom?



Jan 15, 2013 at 06:14 PM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · Having a battery as backup vs battery grip


firstgear99 wrote:
how do you hold a camera when you are adjusting the zoom?


You hold it just the way I described in an earlier post up the thread. The fingers and curl around the zoom ring and the thumb holds it on the other side for stability and control in cooperation with the fingers. That way you can manipulate the focus, the zoom, and the aperture ring (when present) with ease, maintaining good balance and control of the combination.

That's why those controls are all rings and not levers with knobs or slotted sliders.

A push-pull zoom is held the same way and moved in and out quite naturally.

Here is a page for a photo showing the hold

I think that some of the dislike people report about push-pull zooms and a lot of the 'balance' issues people seem to have are due to holding the camera in other ways.

One big advantage of holding cameras this was is that it forms a tripod with the body. If you plant one leg forward foot point forward and the other leg behind and a bit to the side with foot pointing a bit off to the side, then the whole combination of stance and hold is very stable.

Some of the desire people have for battery grips is for extra controls holding a camera in portrait orientation, but when held the way I advise it is easy to flip back and forth. Neither hand has to move off one set of controls and find another, a point made by Dan upthread. That re-acquisition time slows you down. But holding it this way without a grip the lens just rotates in the hand as you momentarily release it and the right hand has control at all times.

Portrait orientation is illustrated on this page

firstgear99 wrote:
I know that you are all wise,


Unnecessary slam. I am not all wise. We can discuss holding a camera and very directly call it 'properly' or 'improperly' without it being a personal remark about a person. A person may not have learned how to hold a camera and that's just a state of being -- we all start somewhere.

By the way, to be clear, a wrist strap is a good idea and a separate issue from battery grips.



Jan 15, 2013 at 06:43 PM
1      
2
       3       end




FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password