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Archive 2012 · How do you test portable flash batteries
  
 
charleychen
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · How do you test portable flash batteries


I have a few lumedyyne and quantum turbo batteries that I want to test to determine if they need to be rebuilt. I'm looking for suggestions on how to test them.

Previously, I've been testing them with a DSLR and intervalometer. After a certain time, I download the images and count the number of shots that I get without a degradation to the exposure. Now that I have a brand spanking new D800e, I don't want to put too many clicks on it unnecessarily.

One option is I can buy a cheaper body (D70) just for testing. I wanted to see what alternatives are out there before going down this route.

Thanks.



Oct 04, 2012 at 02:01 PM
PeterBerressem
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · How do you test portable flash batteries


For this procedure I'd prefer to use a flashmeter instead.


Oct 04, 2012 at 03:01 PM
jeraldcook
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · How do you test portable flash batteries


So you're wanting to find out how much of the original capacity the battery current has because of its age/use? Or just how many actual flashes?

If it's the former, any decent hobby battery charger can charge and discharge batteries. Just fully charge the Quantum Turbo battery (with either the OEM or hobby charger) and then discharge the battery with the hobby charger. Most tell you both the amount of mAh put in the battery and amount of mAh discharge. Compare those figures to the original capacity to get the percentage of useful capacity left. Quantum Turbo batteries are just NiMH cells so they're nothing special. You might need to make a custom lead but that's the only additional item you would need.

My six year old Triton2 can handle up to 28volt batteries with up 10,000 mAh capacity. It can charge, discharge, cycle just about any type of battery and gives you more information than the average person needs.



Oct 04, 2012 at 05:23 PM
 

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charleychen
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · How do you test portable flash batteries


Thanks for the suggestion on using a generic charger to get a diagnostic on the battery. I have a generic charger, but I guess mine doesn't give me much details. Do you know the pins to use for the quantum batteries?

I want to know condition of the battery and the number of flashes that I can get from each battery.



Oct 04, 2012 at 08:26 PM
bushwacker
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · How do you test portable flash batteries


here this is the best charger so far... better than La Crosse.


Maha Powerex

http://www.amazon.com/Maha-Powerex-MH-C9000-Advanced-Analyzer/dp/B00454YCWY/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1349405896&sr=8-4&keywords=powerex+charger






Oct 05, 2012 at 02:59 AM
jeraldcook
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · How do you test portable flash batteries


I have a Maha Powerex, and yes it is the best charger on the market, but that's not what charleychen needs. He needs a charger that will handle whole battery packs, not the individual cells.

This is what I have but it is a little pricey (though cheaper than an extra camera I suppose):
http://www.amazon.com/Great-Planes-ElectriFly-Computer-GPMM3153/dp/B000OZR3XI

Although you get by with something like this:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__5548__IMAX_B6_Charger_Discharger_1_6_Cells_GENUINE_.html

As for the correct leads, I'm familiar with the Quantum leads but you would have make you own. It would probably cost you $10 at Radio Shack. You would need to do a bit of soldering though.

The beauty of this method is that you would only need to test on the flashes one time. Once you know that a 5,000 mAh (also called a 5 Ah battery) gives you 250 flashes, for instance, you know that each flash needs 20 mAh. From then on you just need to charge and discharge the battery, figure out the current mAh capacity, and divide by 20 to figure out how many flashes the battery will provide.




Oct 05, 2012 at 03:30 AM





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