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Archive 2012 · How to do this incredible technique
  
 
qwyjibo
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p.4 #1 · p.4 #1 · How to do this incredible technique


^ I actually think that Eyeball illustrated that it's actually pretty straightforward. He needs an angle angle more like the one in the diagram above and a second flash to light up the face, and then I think it would look really close. And no, this doesn't explain the glasses but perhaps that's not DOF but more a function of imperfections in the glass or the incident angle of reflection being a bit too acute.


Jun 25, 2012 at 03:51 AM
XPO239
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p.4 #2 · p.4 #2 · How to do this incredible technique


It's single exposure. Pretty easy to do. :-)


Jun 25, 2012 at 05:45 AM
JonMold
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p.4 #3 · p.4 #3 · How to do this incredible technique


Tony Hoffer wrote:
Yes, that is exactly what I'm saying. There's actually two ways that I can think of. Neither of them are a double exposure or 5D3-type trick. We'll do one at the Genesis reunion.


YES, knew there was a reason for going back to the reunion :



Jun 25, 2012 at 09:49 AM
 

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Eyeball
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p.4 #4 · p.4 #4 · How to do this incredible technique


Jon-Mark wrote:
Cool attempt, but this technique would not work for a shot of a couple with a gap between them, as you are hiding the reflection of the camera in your silhouette. It must be a double exposure.


The subject/silhouette was not hiding the camera. The camera was neither in front of nor in back of the subject. The only thing hidden by the subject was my flash facing the wall behind her but I could have side-lit the wall behind her just as easily if I had the time. If there happened to be another window or open sky behind the subject, the flash would not even be necessary.

If you take a look at the diagram I posted earlier, I used exactly that setup with the only difference being that the "V" between the camera and the subject was much narrower than shown. The camera was almost next to the subject. I used the narrow "V" in my case because that is what I needed to match the line-of-sight to my window and a relatively open space of white wall for the subject backdrop. The "V" though can be as wide as you like though following the angle of incidence/angle of reflection rules and within the limits of the window and background sizes and positions.



Jun 25, 2012 at 11:17 AM
Eyeball
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p.4 #5 · p.4 #5 · How to do this incredible technique


qwyjibo wrote:
^ I actually think that Eyeball illustrated that it's actually pretty straightforward. He needs an angle angle more like the one in the diagram above and a second flash to light up the face, and then I think it would look really close. And no, this doesn't explain the glasses but perhaps that's not DOF but more a function of imperfections in the glass or the incident angle of reflection being a bit too acute.


I actually tried to throw some light on the front of the subject with a reflector but it wasn't enough to be noticeable. I was losing the light and too tired to set up another flash but, yes, I think that would have done it. Honestly, I can totally imagine a roof-top set-up where this could be done pretty easy. Think about an observation deck with an open top but with glassed-in sides. Something like that would do it.

Difficult to be sure what method the photographer used. The online articles are not consistent. What is funny is that anyone seeing these images will think they are done in Photoshop anyway, so I'm not sure it matters.

Still, I thought the experiment was interesting and I think it demonstrates that reflections can be a powerful tool for wedding photographers. I was reminded of the beach house reflection photo that was posted a while back and the the one where the backlight projected a shadow of the couple onto glass between them and the camera. When the couple knows you did it "live", it probably has more of a "wow" factor when they see the print.



Jun 25, 2012 at 11:33 AM
brett maxwell
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p.4 #6 · p.4 #6 · How to do this incredible technique


To frame these subjects with a 150mm on full frame, your focus distance would be 4-5 feet.



I just checked this, and here's what your background would look like at f32.



Just maybe a tiny point-n-shoot sensor and a tiny aperture could pull this off with acceptable sharpness of the background, but I think we can be pretty confident these aren't done that way, and it still wouldn't account for the shallow DOF on the glasses.



Jun 25, 2012 at 08:00 PM
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