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Archive 2011 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)
  
 
jake40509
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p.1 #1 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


Okay...this is totally a noob question, but I would really appreciate a response.

So, I'm leaning to use my histogram. My Nikon D300s will also show the "clipped" areas while reviewing pics. I want to eliminate these clipped areas. How?

Change shutter speed? Change ISO? Aperture?
This is perplexing to me.

Feedback, thoughts, suggestions are very much appreciated!
Jake



Dec 20, 2011 at 12:21 AM
Bruce Sawle
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p.1 #2 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


What is clipped would be my first question? From there we might be able to help you. Post an exams so we here can see where the issue is. Without a photo we would just be guessing.


Dec 20, 2011 at 12:28 AM
wickerprints
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p.1 #3 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


Highlight clipping occurs when the exposure chosen by you or the camera's metering system is such that the brightness of certain regions of the scene is too great for the camera sensor to record.

Thus, the question of how to avoid this phenomenon is inextricably linked to the choice of exposure, which considers how best to represent the brightness of the objects in the scene. That is to say, you can certainly decrease the exposure in order to avoid highlight clipping (or eliminate it entirely), but the resulting exposure may be "too dark" for those objects in the scene you consider the most important.

When relying on the camera's metering system to determine exposure, the camera tries to take into consideration the relationship between the brightness of various elements in the scene to choose an exposure that avoids excessive clipping of highlights while presenting the primary subject with an average tonal distribution. Depending on the metering mode and the scene composition, the chosen exposure may or may not be your desired exposure.

If the exposure is clearly too bright and there is no risk of undesirably dark underexposure by decreasing it, then one can either shoot in manual exposure mode or use exposure compensation to decrease the exposure. This involves adjusting one of three possible settings:

1. Decrease the amount of time the shutter is open (i.e., increase shutter speed).
2. Decrease the lens aperture diameter (i.e., increase f-number).
3. Decrease the ISO sensitivity (i.e., make the ISO value smaller).

Each of the above adjustments affects the resulting image in a different way. For instance, doing (1) may cause objects that are moving during the exposure interval to appear "frozen" in time. Doing (2) will increase the depth of field. And doing (3) will decrease the amount of noise in the resulting image. And doing the opposite of the above has the opposite effect.

However, it must be stressed that the issue of highlight clipping really can only be addressed in the broader context of choosing the most appropriate exposure for the desired subject, which is one of the fundamental principles of photography. As one becomes more experienced with digital imaging, advanced techniques like HDR and exposure fusion may be used to address the limitations of the camera sensor's dynamic range when attempting to photograph scenes with an extremely large tonal distribution.



Dec 20, 2011 at 12:47 AM
jake40509
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p.1 #4 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


Wow! Awesome! Thank you so much for the feedback and for the education. I sincerely appreciate it.

Jake



Dec 20, 2011 at 01:04 AM
runamuck
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p.1 #5 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


"Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson.
http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-3rd-Photographs-Camera/dp/0817439390/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324523165&sr=8-1

Or check it out from your local library. Library is free. Amazon charges.



Dec 22, 2011 at 03:09 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



HerbChong
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p.1 #6 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


newbies need to know that none of these have any effect unless all the other exposure parameters are held constant. in any of the automatic modes, they are not. thus, until you are used to shooting in manual exposure mode, you use exposure compensation to actually decrease the exposure. otherwise, the camera will adjust the other parameter you haven't fixed to compensate and you end up overexposing just as much.

Herb....

wickerprints wrote:
If the exposure is clearly too bright and there is no risk of undesirably dark underexposure by decreasing it, then one can either shoot in manual exposure mode or use exposure compensation to decrease the exposure. This involves adjusting one of three possible settings:

1. Decrease the amount of time the shutter is open (i.e., increase shutter speed).
2. Decrease the lens aperture diameter (i.e., increase f-number).
3. Decrease the ISO sensitivity (i.e., make the ISO value smaller).




Dec 22, 2011 at 04:52 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #7 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


runamuck wrote:
"Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson.
http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-3rd-Photographs-Camera/dp/0817439390/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324523165&sr=8-1


+1000000



Dec 22, 2011 at 07:56 PM
Imagemaster
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p.1 #8 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


HerbChong wrote:
newbies need to know that none of these have any effect unless all the other exposure parameters are held constant. in any of the automatic modes, they are not. thus, until you are used to shooting in manual exposure mode, you use exposure compensation to actually decrease the exposure. otherwise, the camera will adjust the other parameter you haven't fixed to compensate and you end up overexposing just as much.

Herb....




Which means that all the other exposure parameters are held constant.



Dec 23, 2011 at 03:24 AM
Steve Wylie
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p.1 #9 · Correcting Clipping: How to? (noob question)


It's kinda funny. On my view of this thread, there's an ad for Canon. I don't know about the Nikon D300 S, but for a new Canon photographer wanting to avoid clipping highlights, I'd recommend setting one of the custom functions to enable "Highlight Tone Priority". Does the D300 S have a similar function?


Dec 25, 2011 at 08:11 AM





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