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Archive 2011 · AEOLUS, EOS and us
  
 
Photon
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


PetKal wrote:
Geert, that generally works, unless the wind is so strong that it starts to pendulate the large backpack in which case you'd end up with a sinusoidal disturbance exerted on the tripod platform.

My sinuses hurt and I'm getting mal-de-mer just thinking about your disturbing scenario.



Dec 19, 2011 at 05:40 PM
PetKal
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


Jess, here we are , screwing around with homonyms in the woodpile again.
Please let us attempt to steer the discourse back to the practical aspects of terrestrial use of gears for purposes of photography.



Dec 19, 2011 at 06:57 PM
Tony B
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


PetKal wrote:
Good thinking, Jess.
However, birds very seldom fly headlong into the wind whereby their ground speed would be greatly diminished. The reason is that birds are not stupid.
On occasion they use headwinds in order to slow glide/kite and hover using less energy.


Birds take off & fly into headwinds.There is a school of thought that if birds go with the wind they possibly could have no control of where they are going. Again it is thought that because of the way feathers are shaped, they would ruffle and may be damaged if the bird had its back to the wind. It is more aerodynamic to fly into the wind. Or so I have read in bird research. A useful tip for photographing branched birds-if there is wind.



Dec 19, 2011 at 11:31 PM
 

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M Vers
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


Take your time and be patient...that's all I can add, well and this image which was taken on a very breezy day--one millisecond the robber was in the frame, the next not. It is a multiple image stack shot handheld with a Sigma 150+1.4x+tubes on a 1DIII at or around 1x. IIRC I took around four or five shots at this angle.






That said, I'm not a fan of wind--particularly when shooting macro. If it happens to be windy, I turn my attention towards less affected surfaces...i.e. trees, rocks, the ground.



Dec 19, 2011 at 11:58 PM
splathrop
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


Get yourself a big heavy vehicle with stiff suspension. A school bus would be good. When you want to shoot across the wind, the bus can point into it and be pretty stable. Then you shoot out the window from a (much more) stable platform. Some of you seem to have lens collections that cost more than a school bus, so I'm calling it practical.


Dec 20, 2011 at 12:42 AM
splathrop
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · AEOLUS, EOS and us


One troublesome wind (and other factors) effect PetKal did not mention is atmospheric disruption, amounting to what astronomers call "bad seeing." Shots taken with telephotos and/or over long distances are most affected. Best way to deal with that is to avoid making photo trips where you will encounter it. Google clearskyclock for a great web site offering hour-by-hour predictions of seeing conditions at locations near you—unfortunately confined to night-time hours, dawn, and dusk. But very helpful.


Dec 20, 2011 at 01:08 AM
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