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Archive 2011 · to crop or not to crop?
  
 
OntheRez
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p.2 #1 · to crop or not to crop?


Jeff,

Sharp is for knives, axes, and some women's tongues In an image, universal sharpness (whatever that is) would be horrible. Mr. Gardner - as he always does - has provided a superb technical explanation of why this is so. For Photozone or anyone to suggest that Canon's best primes aren't all that good because they are better on a crop camera than a full frame one is just stupidity. Every lens (at least those affordable to mere mortals) has some degree of distortion or softness in one or more of its aspects. Again as Mr. Gardner has noted this is because we are attempting to capture a 3 (really more) dimensional world on a 2-D plane. Fundamental geometry says something has to give.

A full frame camera uses all of the glass and therefore makes one potentially more aware of what is happening at the edges. A crop camera can only utilize the center of the lens which in all cases is a lens' best spot.

Technically the best photos are taken with the largest sensors and the best quality lenses. This however requires skill that can only be learned by hundreds/thousands of attempts. We don't know what your goals are, your experience, or what uses you might make of photos you take thus it is hard to give you any concrete answers.

One generic answer is that in the world of camera gear - with very few exceptions - the more you pay the better you get. There is, of course, infinite arguments as to what the cost benefit ratios are. In the end there are no perfect cameras, no perfect lenses, and no perfect pictures. Any camera, all cameras are compromises. Just pick one up and start shooting.

Robert



Dec 10, 2011 at 02:29 AM
mjeffbr
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p.2 #2 · to crop or not to crop?


CGardner, Skibum5 and Robert, a thousand thanks, your responses really clarified things and helped me make a decision




Dec 10, 2011 at 02:45 AM
TheWengler
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p.2 #3 · to crop or not to crop?


mjeffbr wrote:
I do not know why the same lenses get much better reviews for crop sensor cameras (they post two reviews of each lens), but as he posts all the test results one should assume they have some credibility, even though I think for a moment that the same results could be taken as “better” simply because you have a crop, so for a crop shooter it’s ok, you should be thankful, but for a full frame you deserve more…

I was pretty convinced that FF was the way to go, but now I kinda have that doubt, an example: the 70-200
...Show more

The weak point for most lenses will be around the edges. So when you take a lens designed for FF and put it on a cropped body, you're eliminating the softest areas. This is why they score better on the tests when tested on cropped cameras. The 85/1.2 gives mediocre border results in his tests so he gives the lens a score of 3/5. Everyone knows that border resolution isn't a key element for this lens hence the 4.5/5 for field quality score.



Dec 10, 2011 at 06:56 AM
BrianO
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p.2 #4 · to crop or not to crop?


"To crop or not to crop?"

Do both! Get a full-frame camera, and on those rare occasions when edge-to-edge sharpness is important just crop the image to the APS-C equivalent area. That's what Photoshop is for, right?



Dec 10, 2011 at 08:31 AM
Max10
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p.2 #5 · to crop or not to crop?


"To crop or not to crop?"

Only you can decide based on your observations and needs.



Dec 10, 2011 at 09:03 AM
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