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Archive 2011 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring
  
 
jmckayak
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p.2 #1 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


Push/pull zoom is intuitive, You KNOW when you've zoomed out, and when you've zoomed in. I have to check zoom position on a ring zoom. Both designs work well. If you can't adapt to different zoom mechanisms, you probably shouldn't THINK of driving a car. Or using a computer...
John Mc



Dec 08, 2011 at 03:52 PM
Sharona
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p.2 #2 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


trenchmonkey wrote:
35+ years with Canon, I still lurk and offer advice to my peeps.
See my review of the 35-350L...I've had 'em all
Hell, I rocked wildlife with a 100-300 f5.6L back in the film era.


Just had to give you some crap.... I do remember that you once were a Canon shooter; not sure how you got dragged over the other side. Notice, I didn't say "dark" side....


My film camera was a Minolta. Need to drag it out to see which one, though....that was a long time ago.



Dec 08, 2011 at 03:56 PM
Ian.Dobinson
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p.2 #3 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


The monkey is always welcome round here

anyway dont forget its him that will be delivering all our presents in a couple of weeks time so we had all better be nice to him

Dear TM
for xmas I would like a 1Dmk4 and 70-200/2.8 IS mk2

I have been a good boy all year honest



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:07 PM
omarlyn
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p.2 #4 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


Ian.Dobinson wrote:
The monkey is always welcome round here

anyway dont forget its him that will be delivering all our presents in a couple of weeks time so we had all better be nice to him

Dear TM
for xmas I would like a 1Dmk4 and 70-200/2.8 IS mk2

I have been a good boy all year honest



Hmmm...I'm not so sure about that Ian...I remember this 'lame' post of yours a few months ago...that will cost you a downgrade to a 1DIII and 70-200/4 non IS.

Omar



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:18 PM
troy12n
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p.2 #5 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


JimboCin wrote:
The Canon 100-400 is the only Canon-mount lens that I know of that is push-pull.

Are there others?


100-400
28-300
35-350
100-300

At least those, only the top 2 are still made.



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:24 PM
Ian.Dobinson
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p.2 #6 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


omarlyn wrote:
Hmmm...I'm not so sure about that Ian...I remember this 'lame' post of yours a few months ago...that will cost you a downgrade to a 1DIII and 70-200/4 non IS.

Omar


Dam , Busted maybe if ive that naughty I'll have to settle for some Nikon gear



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:24 PM
troy12n
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p.2 #7 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


n0b0 wrote:
Never had any problem with the 100-400L either. Faster way to zoom than a rotating zoom I reckon.

I suspect the issue or weakness of push/pull zoom had been exaggerated by internet parrots. If you use it with an open mind, it won't be long before it becomes second nature.


I dont know what you mean by weakness, but as far as accuracy, a twist or rotating zoom is MUCH easier to control precisely than push/pull. This is a fact. There is a reason primes are not push-pull focus...



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:26 PM
Gunzorro
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p.2 #8 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


omarlyn wrote:
Alrighty then...everyone's replies are very reassuring then that it's not gonna be an issue for me I'm considering an older 35-350L (or possibly the newer 28-300L IS) so I feel alot better now about getting one.

Omar


Omar -- Since you are inclined toward a super-zoom, as I am, I'm sure you will be happy with either Canon L offering. I bought a nice copy of the 35-350L (1994 vintage) and was surprised with the high quality of images throughout the range, especially at f/8, but completely usable wide open. I've been gushing out comments and images on several threads, and researched all references I could find while waiting. Trenchmonkey offered some terrific advice.

I previously used the 28-300L via the CPS loaner program and it was great, but quite a bit more money to buy, so I went with the 35-350 for under $1000. If I had my druthers, I would own the 28-300 with IS -- that's a big asset for the longer focal lengths. It is on my wish list and will probably have it one day. Used, they can be found for just under $2000.

For my uses, the 35-350 is one of the best Canon lens investments I've made, nearly as practical as the faster 24-70L and 16-35L II. I'm itching to try some event or wedding photography with it, but nothing on the horizon at the moment.



Dec 08, 2011 at 04:44 PM
PetKal
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p.2 #9 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


troy12n wrote:
I dont know what you mean by weakness, but as far as accuracy, a twist or rotating zoom is MUCH easier to control precisely than push/pull. This is a fact. There is a reason primes are not push-pull focus...


You are probably right, but that zooming precision is of no practical consequence.......I can not imagine a situation where I'd need to fine tune FL to within 5% or some such. However, the manual focus requirements are much more exacting, and I suppose a telescoping kind of MF mechanism wouldn't work as well as the standard rotary type.



Dec 08, 2011 at 06:21 PM
scalesusa
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p.2 #10 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


troy12n wrote:
100-400
28-300
35-350
100-300

At least those, only the top 2 are still made.

Also

35-105mm
70-210mm f/4
70-210 f/3.5-4.5

I loved the old 70-210 twist and zoom, you could manually focus and zoom in one fast motion, at the time, it was great for fast action that needed zooming to follow it. Still is.



Dec 08, 2011 at 06:31 PM
 

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dehrk
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p.2 #11 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


I vastly prefer EF 35-80mm f/4-5.6 PZ's method.


Dec 08, 2011 at 06:42 PM
Gochugogi
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p.2 #12 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


robstein wrote:
Yeah, I started with an EF 35-105 push/pull and LOVED it. To this day when I bolt it on my camera it feels so natural (part of that is I used only that lens for years and traveled a lot with it).


That was my first EF zoom back in 1990. Still got a lot of prints on the wall from that lens. Many of the first and second generation zoom designs were push-pull. My old EF 100-300 5.6L was push-pull too. Much faster zoom action than twist zooms but tend to suck in more dust than twist zooms. Probably I tended to pump those things too much...



Dec 08, 2011 at 06:53 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.2 #13 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


omarlyn wrote:
I'm considering a few lens options of the Push/Pull Zoom type and I have a question for those who are using such a lens. I have never used a push/pull zoom…after 20 years of using rotating zoom rings, the thought of a push/pull seems so counter-intuitive to me. Is there any real difficulty in using push/pull zooms over rotating zoom rings or does it quickly become second nature?

Omar


Before I got the 100-400, I paid attention to the threads bemoaning the push-pull design. Then I used the lens and realized that it isn't a problem at all, and that there is even a functional argument for it based on how your hand tends to stay under center (more or less) of balance as you zoom.

It seems completely natural to me now, even though I also use zoom ring lenses.

Dan



Dec 08, 2011 at 09:18 PM
Pixel Perfect
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p.2 #14 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


I've said it before, that Canon could move any new 100-400/500 to a rotary zoom and keep the speed benefits of push-pull as well as the precision benefits of rotary. What they need to do in make the zooming non-linear, just like with a computer mouse where the further you push the faster it moves, in this case the more you trun the zoom ring the faster it zooms. For smaller movements you can get very precise FL changes, but for extreme FL change, you just need to turn the ring a bit further and the zooming will accelerate in proportion to how far you turn the ring.

The pros of push pull are a more compact design when at minimum FL, but then it is much longer at full zoom.

I have no issues using the 100-400 push-pull design, but still prefer using the 70-200 rotary zoom. I think we can have our cake and eat it too.



Dec 08, 2011 at 09:28 PM
PetKal
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p.2 #15 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


gdanmitchell wrote:
Then I used the lens and realized that it isn't a problem at all, and that there is even a functional argument for it based on how your hand tends to stay under center (more or less) of balance as you zoom.
Dan


Unfortunately, that matters very little for hand-held shooting with 100-400. In fact, it is undesireable to have to extend your hand away from your body as the lens is zoomed out. In doing so, the left upper arm/elbow tends to lose support on the chest which causes the lens to become destabilized.






Dec 09, 2011 at 02:02 AM
scalesusa
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p.2 #16 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


The biggest benefits that are or may be related to push pull on the 100-400 for me are:

Telescopes to a short length to fit in most any camera bag that will takee a 70-200mm f/2.8.

Close MFD for more magnification, and close shots of small birds.

Mine gets used mostly at 400mm, and then telescopes nicely for storage.



Dec 09, 2011 at 02:32 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.2 #17 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


PetKal wrote:
Unfortunately, that matters very little for hand-held shooting with 100-400. In fact, it is undesireable to have to extend your hand away from your body as the lens is zoomed out. In doing so, the left upper arm/elbow tends to lose support on the chest which causes the lens to become destabilized.


Boy, that isn't my experience at all. As they say, YMMV.

scalesusa's point is also worth repeating. The 100-400 becomes relatively small when the zoom is retracted, making it much easier to pack and handle.

Dan



Dec 09, 2011 at 02:50 AM
jcolwell
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p.2 #18 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


scalesusa wrote:
Also

35-105mm
70-210mm f/4
70-210 f/3.5-4.5

I loved the old 70-210 twist and zoom, you could manually focus and zoom in one fast motion, at the time, it was great for fast action that needed zooming to follow it. Still is.


Plus, 50-200/3.5-4.5 L and 50-200/3.5-4.5 (not L).

Also, there are two versions of the 100-300/5.6, one of them is "L", the other is not.

I use the 28-300L IS plus a few "Alternative" push-pull (PP) zooms, plus I used to own the 50-200L, 100-300L, and a ton of old manual focus PP zooms. I've never had problems switching between PP and the zoom-ring lenses. As long as the push/pull mechanism is smooth, and not too tight or too loose, it's a pleasure to use. IMO, a PP zoom lens is more 'organic' than a zoom-ring lens - if you want a longer focal length, you simply make the lens longer.



Dec 09, 2011 at 01:58 PM
EOS20
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p.2 #19 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


I've owned 2 100-400's and a 35-350 and I like the push/pull zoom design and once you get use to using it.




Dec 09, 2011 at 07:01 PM
skibum5
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p.2 #20 · Push/Pull Zoom vs Rotating Zoom Ring


omarlyn wrote:
I'm considering a few lens options of the Push/Pull Zoom type and I have a question for those who are using such a lens. I have never used a push/pull zoom…after 20 years of using rotating zoom rings, the thought of a push/pull seems so counter-intuitive to me. Is there any real difficulty in using push/pull zooms over rotating zoom rings or does it quickly become second nature?

Omar


instantly second nature to me, plus you don't even have to remember which direction to turn if you are swapping between brands a lot.

I mean if you want more reach you just push it out towards the object want less pull it away from the object, as second nature as can be. One could easily argue that it is far more natural, intuitive and first nature than twist.


Edited on Dec 09, 2011 at 07:08 PM · View previous versions



Dec 09, 2011 at 07:04 PM
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