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1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar

  
 
Mujabad123
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
I can totally get how his music might not translate to Dutch. Definitely an acquired taste.



But he sure has a wonderful deep voice. Friends of me are really into "Americana" music. They love it!



Mar 30, 2024 at 07:32 AM
Sharona
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
Okay, here's something I picked up right after Christmas (and am so looking forward to paying the Use Tax on it next month) - a 1966 Gibson SJ200 which were often simply called S200's but the SJ stands for Super Jumbo. I finally got around to dressing and polishing the frets, cleaning the guitars, applying Fret Doctor to the fret board to re-moisturize it, adjust the truss rod for correct neck relief (approx. .003-.005 one thousandths) and adjust the intonation and slap on a set of String Joy strings. Sounding pretty good now even with the weird adjustable bridge.
...Show more

Gorgeous. Are you saying that this is actually his guitar? That is incredible! He was an amazing songwriter and musician.

ETA: Yes, I see that this was his instrument. That is really something Peter. And yes, him and David Lindley. RIP to two greats.




Mar 30, 2024 at 12:59 PM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Sharona wrote:
Gorgeous. Are you saying that this is actually his guitar? That is incredible! He was an amazing songwriter and musician.

ETA: Yes, I see that this was his instrument. That is really something Peter. And yes, him and David Lindley. RIP to two greats.



Along with the guitar there was also a hand written letter by Prine on Gruhn Guitar's stationary talking about when he bought the guitar from Gruhn's in '91 and when traded it for a vintage Gibson J45 in 2011 along with a photo of John with this guitar. And yes, for me, those two were huge and needless losses to the music world and while I never met Prine, I did photograph Lindley at his home in Claremont, Ca. for Frets Magazine back in '87.




Mar 30, 2024 at 01:57 PM
Mujabad123
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Now...him I know..David Lindley. I must have one of his albums somewhere in my house.
Fine music!



Mar 30, 2024 at 02:14 PM
Sharona
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
Along with the guitar there was also a hand written letter by Prine on Gruhn Guitar's stationary talking about when he bought the guitar from Gruhn's in '91 and when traded it for a vintage Gibson J45 in 2011 along with a photo of John with this guitar. And yes, for me, those two were huge and needless losses to the music world and while I never met Prine, I did photograph Lindley at his home in Claremont, Ca. for Frets Magazine back in '87.


That is so damn cool. Not sure you remember but I put a photo of myself with David and Wally Ingram from a show many years ago on your thread when we lost David. I got to talk with him on several occasions and bought him kabobs one evening. Godammit anyway. And your photo of him was just lovely.



Mar 30, 2024 at 04:13 PM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Sharona wrote:
That is so damn cool. Not sure you remember but I put a photo of myself with David and Wally Ingram from a show many years ago on your thread when we lost David. I got to talk with him on several occasions and bought him kabobs one evening. Godammit anyway. And your photo of him was just lovely.


Yep. Wally was a great drummer and I think that even though he was not on the 1981 El Rayo-X record from Lindley, he did go on the road with that band. I don't remember you posting your photo but I'm glad you did. It's always interesting to see which musicians have affected the photographers among us, and it's refreshing to see people you respect share some of the quirky influences. In addition to being at Lindley's home, I heard him play solo at McCabe's Guitar Shop, play with Ry Cooder i Santa Monica and play with Jackson Browne in Irvine, but never saw El Rayo-X unfortunately.




Mar 30, 2024 at 05:05 PM
Danpbphoto
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Fantastic capture in many ways Peter!
You have received a classic musical instrument!
Takes a GREAT image also!
Congrats!
Dan



Apr 02, 2024 at 11:40 AM
justandyphoto
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Stunning shot, beautiful guitar and great story to go with it!


Apr 03, 2024 at 11:38 PM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


justandyphoto wrote:
Stunning shot, beautiful guitar and great story to go with it!


Thanks Andy, and welcome to Fred Miranda. The more Minnesotans the merrier. I left there in '57 at six months old after one winter but I still have relatives in Duluth and Ely and can't wait to get back to visit.

I read your GBS story. Holy crap. Cannot even imagine.




Apr 04, 2024 at 02:38 AM
 


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chiron
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
Okay, here's something I picked up right after Christmas (and am so looking forward to paying the Use Tax on it next month) - a 1966 Gibson SJ200 which were often simply called S200's but the SJ stands for Super Jumbo. I finally got around to dressing and polishing the frets, cleaning the guitars, applying Fret Doctor to the fret board to re-moisturize it, adjust the truss rod for correct neck relief (approx. .003-.005 one thousandths) and adjust the intonation and slap on a set of String Joy strings. Sounding pretty good now even with the weird adjustable bridge.
...Show more

Lovely image and you must be very pleased to have this guitar that is so rich in the history of. music and our own time.

A question: You mention that you spent about 20 minutes in post on the image. Can you describe in as much detail as you like what you did to the image? It would be interesting to see what a craftsman does in post with an image that we can look at in its finished form.



Apr 06, 2024 at 09:34 PM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


chiron wrote:
Lovely image and you must be very pleased to have this guitar that is so rich in the history of. music and our own time.

A question: You mention that you spent about 20 minutes in post on the image. Can you describe in as much detail as you like what you did to the image? It would be interesting to see what a craftsman does in post with an image that we can look at in its finished form.


Thank you so much. I am pleased with the image but as soon as I posted this version I started seeing things I didn't like and ended up re-shooting it, and then, being some kind of an idiot, I wasn't happy with how the low E string was being rendered at full resolution and then I shot it again at f/8 rather than f/11 and while that was still better, I wondered if perhaps the slight tilt I used in the original might have affected that fine fine detail and so I shot it again but switching from the Canon 135 t/s lens to the Sigma 135mm 1.8 ART lens, and, much to my surprise, the Sigma was resolving that detail more effectively, but this time I did a very short focus stack of about seven or eight images, first stacking those images with Helicon, which did not handle the transitions in those wound strings around in the area of the bridge without an awkward glow, so I re-did the focus stack in Zerene Stacker it was much much better. Aaah...

The post on both versions was essentially the same. I drew a Path around the wardrobe trunk including where the headstock protruded and made a selection from that Path that I used to copy that selection to a new layer (Cmd-J or Ctrl-J Mac vs PC).
Then I made a Curves Adjustment Layer placed between those two layers to darken just the area outside of the trunk. Then I moved up in the layer stack and made a large oval selection that roughly and loosely covered the guitar and made a 1000 pixel blur to the selection, inverted the selection and used that for another Curves adjustment layer to darken and vignette both the trunk and background and to help blend those two more into the shadows while still retaining some degree of separation in most areas. After that there were probably a couple Curves adjustment layers to lighten or darken small specific areas.

Then, when I thought it was all said and done, I decided that, even though I had done the intonation (adjusting the individual nylon saddle pieces forward and backward) that even though they were correct according to my Petersen tuning app on the iPhone, they were not exactly where one might expect them to be given where they would normally be adjusted, so I fudged them just a bit and shot the bridge again and dropped that in on top of everything. Made a couple of very very sharp 16x20 prints - one to send to the guy I bought it from and one to send to Gibson in Bozeman along with a print of the letter that Prine hand wrote about this guitar.




Apr 06, 2024 at 11:14 PM
chiron
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
Thank you so much. I am pleased with the image but as soon as I posted this version I started seeing things I didn't like and ended up re-shooting it, and then, being some kind of an idiot, I wasn't happy with how the low E string was being rendered at full resolution and then I shot it again at f/8 rather than f/11 and while that was still better, I wondered if perhaps the slight tilt I used in the original might have affected that fine fine detail and so I shot it again but switching from the
...Show more

Love your response--especially, I love your description of your re-shooting and re-working the image because of the very subtle dissatisfactions you had with the first take. And your detailed description of the post-processing is exactly what I hoped to read--it is very instructive to see what a master printer does to get his images where he wants them.

I think the impulse, almost the compulsion, to revision and the willingness to do the work of revising is one of the great virtues in the arts, and your efforts here demonstrate that.

Thank you for all the detail!



Apr 07, 2024 at 08:41 AM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


chiron wrote:
Love your response--especially, I love your description of your re-shooting and re-working the image because of the very subtle dissatisfactions you had with the first take. And your detailed description of the post-processing is exactly what I hoped to read--it is very instructive to see what a master printer does to get his images where he wants them.

I think the impulse, almost the compulsion, to revision and the willingness to do the work of revising is one of the great virtues in the arts, and your efforts here demonstrate that.

Thank you for all the detail!


One of the most difficult things to do for any artist no matter the discipline is to self edit and especially to be able to look at your own work as if it was being done by someone else and not get too pissed off when you find things you should have changed. For me, a lot of that ability has been helped by working with great art directors where commercial images were always a collaboration and always with some give and take, for many years with the art director right by your side either on location or in the studio, then graduating in the mid 1990's to shooting Polaroids and first just faxing that to the art director and then making a quick scan and emailing it, and then of course, just pulling a jpeg from your digital capture and sending that.

But what you learned from that collaborative process was how to look at your own work through another person's eyes and learn how to catch things that you might be blind to, at least at first. I think it helps to have trusted people to bounce ideas and opinions off of and that all too often does not happen at a site like this as there are too many people who simply give the same praise to everything they comment on or are incapable of giving truly constructive criticism.

For me, the very best thing I can do is to leave the image until the next day (and do that several days in a row) and when you come back and look with fresh eyes you see those things you were blind to the first couple of times around, and that's what I did not do with this one. The overall vibe was there but the details, which so far, no one has commented on, were things that I didn't see until later.

Anyway, I really appreciate your asking these questions and having this back and forth conversation which I hope is useful to others as well. And this is the type of interaction that I'd like to see a lot more of here. Thanks again.




Apr 07, 2024 at 06:17 PM
chiron
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
One of the most difficult things to do for any artist no matter the discipline is to self edit and especially to be able to look at your own work as if it was being done by someone else and not get too pissed off when you find things you should have changed. For me, a lot of that ability has been helped by working with great art directors where commercial images were always a collaboration and always with some give and take, for many years with the art director right by your side either on location or in
...Show more

Apropos of what you are saying here about revision, there is a wonderful book by James Lord about the process day by day of Alberto Giacometti painting Lord's portrait over eighteen days while Lord sat in front of him. One of the things that stands out is how Giacometti would constantly obliterate what he had done and would redo the painting again and again trying to get it to match what he was seeing in his mind's eye. It is a wonderful book, and, if you don't know it, I think you would enjoy it very much. It is a quick read, 117 pages, in paperback. It is called "A Giacometti Portrait." It is also in part about persistence and strong-mindedness and hard work in the making of art.



Apr 07, 2024 at 06:51 PM
Peter Figen
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


chiron wrote:
Apropos of what you are saying here about revision, there is a wonderful book by James Lord about the process day by day of Alberto Giacometti painting Lord's portrait over eighteen days while Lord sat in front of him. One of the things that stands out is how Giacometti would constantly obliterate what he had done and would redo the painting again and again trying to get it to match what he was seeing in his mind's eye. It is a wonderful book, and, if you don't know it, I think you would enjoy it very much. It is a
...Show more

Thanks. Ordered.




Apr 07, 2024 at 10:52 PM
Danpbphoto
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Peter Figen wrote:
Thanks Andy, and welcome to Fred Miranda. The more Minnesotans the merrier. I left there in '57 at six months old after one winter but I still have relatives in Duluth and Ely and can't wait to get back to visit.

I read your GBS story. Holy crap. Cannot even imagine.


Lived in Iowa Peter. Dad's family had a cabin on Lake Vermillion, Cook, Minnesota. I LOVED it there! We left Ft Dodge, Iowa in 1958 for Mary-land.







Voss's Fishing Resort, Lake Vermillion







Grandfather on Lake Vermillion




Apr 09, 2024 at 12:09 PM
newyork
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p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · 1966 Gibson SJ200 Guitar


Epic guitar and picture. Sublime light and color.


Apr 10, 2024 at 06:43 AM
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