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Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it

  
 
billsamuels
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


I have an OWC Mercury Elite Pro Dual hard drive unit w/ 2-HGST 10TB drives I bought just as HGST was being taken over by Western Digital. One drive was being used as my hardcore storage and the other drive I was using as my final catalog after I had perfect my photos in PS or LR,so I had a huge catalog of photos on it. Because HGST were bullet-proof, and they were not used all the time, I didn't worry about them yet as being ready to crash, especially since my internal drives are a lot older and run fine.

Suddenly, the second drive just stopped working w/o a warning and it has about 3-4TB or my best photos on it. I've taken it out and tried running the drive directly into the USB port, but it doesn't run that way either. The computer reports that there is zero space being used, but oddly enough, it says the drive is "healthy." The OWC unit is supposed to turn RED when it reports a bad drive, but it's still green. Also, the computer just reports that the drive isn't responding and I don't hear anything happening, it's not like the drive makes terrible noises or ever did. It just stopped working.

Any ideas how I can tell for sure what happened and how I can retrieve the data from it? I can care less about repairing the drive itself (unless it's minor), I just want the 3-4 TB of data off it. Is there any software I can use to remove it myself or is this something I have to pay someone to do? Also, is this a sign that the other 10TB HGST is going to fail soon (both 5 years old) or was this just bad luck? I'm wondering if I should stick the working drive into the last HD port in my computer and use it as a regular HD?

And last, what's the most reliable HD's these days for storing photos? Thanks!
Bill



May 25, 2023 at 11:42 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


No drives are designed with >5 years life, although many will last longer. I just had a Seagate Enterprise 10TB drive throw errors this week and it was made in April 2016. All drives will fail, just some sooner than others, so you need to have backups in addition to any arrays with redundancy. I chose to trash the whole dataset of 2016 drives even with RAID 6/Z2, because replacing one drive is just delaying likely failure of others. There are only 3 brands of 3.5" capacity hard drives, Seagate, Toshiba and Western Digital. I have hundreds of TB in Seagate and WD enterprise drives, but no experience with Toshiba. I prefer the recent WD DataCenter (DC) drives because4 they are quieter than Seagate EXOS in a home environment, but performance and rated durability are the same at 550TB/year, 2.5M hours MTTF, and 10^-15 UBER, which are as good as it gets. Amazon, the Google, various datacenters, etc. buy these by the truckload. I expect that all three will be similar in the long run.

I would use a data recovery company like https://www.ontrack.com/en-us or https://drivesaversdatarecovery.com if the data is important. Amateurs messing around with software tools may further damage the drives.

EBH



May 26, 2023 at 12:44 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Bill - It totally sucks when a drive goes bad, but sooner or later every drive is going to fail, no matter what, and at the worst possible moment. I've got about half a dozen of those Elite Duo Pro enclosures and there's nothing inherently wrong with them or even with the drives you put in them. Your big mistakes, and this one is huge, is that you're using these as individual drives and not setting them up as a RAID 1 drive pair where if you lose one drive the other one is already a duplicate of the first one. Just because on drive failed does not mean the other drive, even if it's identical. Shit happens and drives fail.

One accessory you should have is one of OWC's Voyageur docking stations, preferably the two drive USB-C version so you can more effective troubleshooting tools available. That way you can pull both of those drives out of the enclosure and mount them with the Voyageur.

You may need to send this drive out to a commercial recovery service. Usually those folks can work magic even if they have to disassemble the drive and mount the platters in a new unit. I did that once many years ago and everything was recovered - y'know - two thousand dollars later. An expensive lesson, but after that I always have duplicate copies and either with RAID 1 or RAID 5 arrays.

About two months ago I bought a new Gemini enclosure from OWC and put two Toshiba 8TB drives in it configured to a hardware RAID Level 1 array. After about thirty days I got a Tech Tool Pro warning that one of those drives was about to fail it's S.M.A.R.T. drive routines and was expected to die 20-60 times sooner than normal and to back it up as soon as possible.

It turns out that in a hardware RAID 1 array, you have a primary drive and a secondary drive where the data is written to the primary drive first then copied to the secondary. It was my primary drive that was failing. I pulled both drives out and put them in the Voyageur one at a time and ran Disk Utility on both. The bad one failed but the other, the secondary drive was just fine and I was able to copy all the data off of it. I was exactly one day past the return window on the drives from Amazon and they didn't give two craps. I called Toshiba, filled out a form they emailed me and I've never heard from then since and never will. I bought two new drives and will toss those other drives into recycling. So that little episode cost me around three bills and I will never buy anything from Toshiba again. What idiots. They have a warranty but it means squat.

You can read online about what are considered the most reliable drives but it doesn't really matter. They ALL fail sooner or later and ever the best rated brands all still have premature failures. The best thing you can do is to simultaneously copy your files to multiple drives. That's why people use RAID systems, and RAID 5 allows you to configure the system with four or more drives to be able to lose a drive (or two), pop in a new drive and it will rebuild the data onto the new replacement drive. But to be really safe, you want to double up on those RAID boxes and back each one up with another identical one. Sounds complicated and expensive but it's a lot less than data recovery.



May 26, 2023 at 01:12 AM
billsamuels
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Hey Peter,
I feel like such a F* idiot because I bought the OWC dual drive system to keep two copies, but then I didn't live by the rules I set up originally and I kept two different volumes. But what was worse is that I have a 12TB internal drive, one of many drives in my computer (my desktop is a workstation instead of a personal PC so that I could have multiple HD's) and I use that as my central photo drive. However, since I went to Hawaii last fall, I've been downloading all my photos onto the 12 TB drive and the OWC dual drive, but I've been working on LR and saving everything onto the HGST drive that failed, hence, I lost all the photos I perfected. I still have the originals on the 12TB internal, and a back up on the first OWC/HGST, but the good stuff is gone.

Worse yet, until last fall when I returned from Hawaii, I also saved everything I worked on, both on the 12TB internal drive AND a 7TB Seagate External. My mistake is that I stopped backing up on the 7TB Seagate external and the 12TB internal drives. I just assumed that the two OWC/HGST's were really superior hard drives to all the others. I've had nothing but problems with WD and while I've never had a Seagate go bad, I know a lot of people who hate Seagate, and the Seagates I have sound like they're about to crash, even though they just keep ticking like a Timex. They still make me nervous!!! My 12TB internal is a Seagate, but I admit that I hold my breath.

OKAY, so what you're saying makes total sense. I'm NOT going through this again. I'm going to get a much larger either OWC or similar brand unit and set it up to mirror drives so that this doesn't happen again. I think I need a 4-banger! Two sets of mirrors, one set of HD's mirroring the 12 TB inside my computer, two mirroring everything else like I have.

- Which brings me to the question of an old fashioned HD system or SSD? There's something about a HD that doesn't have any moving parts and has a one-million hour lifespan, and Samsung invented the SSD drive, even though they cost more, there's not the replacement issue like with a platter drive;
- For platter drives, what do you like more, WD or Seagate?
- Of your favorite, which one do you think is best (i.e. is the WD Black most reliable?)?
Thanks again, what you say makes a ton of sense!



May 26, 2023 at 02:46 AM
billsamuels
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


EB-1 wrote:
No drives are designed with >5 years life, although many will last longer. I just had a Seagate Enterprise 10TB drive throw errors this week and it was made in April 2016. All drives will fail, just some sooner than others, so you need to have backups in addition to any arrays with redundancy. I chose to trash the whole dataset of 2016 drives even with RAID 6/Z2, because replacing one drive is just delaying likely failure of others. There are only 3 brands of 3.5" capacity hard drives, Seagate, Toshiba and Western Digital. I have hundreds of TB in
...Show more
billsamuels wrote:
I agree that Seagates sound like they're going to crash real bad any second, but I've only had Seagates in recent years. Every time I ever owned a WD, it crashed and died in a very short period of time, so WD lost my interest long ago. However, they took over Sandisk and Sandisk seems to be the same company it used to be, so I assume that WD is much better than it used to be, minus the horrible noise that Seagate makes. My gripe now is that WD bought HGST when I bought these two drives and they
...Show more
EB-1 wrote:
I would use a data recovery company like https://www.ontrack.com/en-us or https://drivesaversdatarecovery.com if the data is important. Amateurs messing around with software tools may further damage the drives.
EBH

billsamuels wrote:
Thanks for these. I'm going to check them out because I really don't want to lose most of the photos on the crashed disk.



May 26, 2023 at 03:46 AM
mcbroomf
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Was the LR catalog itself on the HD that failed, or just the images? From what you said it sounds like the .lrcat is elsewhere.

If it's just the images then all your LR edits are OK as those edits are saved in the catalog. You said that the original raws are on an internal drive so the catalog points to them for the edits before you saved them (tiff/psd/psb etc) to the external drive.

The PS edits might be lost. I'm not sure what happens if you used smart objects and they were re-imported into the LR catalog.



May 26, 2023 at 06:08 AM
goobers
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Sorry to hear this happened. I can't speak to the recovery aspect, but I can speak to investing in cloud backup storage. I use Backblaze and have all of my photography files backed up there after I too suffered a catastrophic hard drive failure shortly after my brother's wedding. Thankfully I was NOT the principal photographer, so no memories were lost -- but I wanted those photos for family and welp they're all gone now.


May 26, 2023 at 12:24 PM
Bruce n Philly
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


I am a bit old fashioned in that I have a four-disk Network Attached Storage (NAS) RAID 5 (allows for a disk failure and no loss of data) on my home network. Further, I run backups of the RAID array to three different high capacity hard drives. So that is more than quadruple redundancy. I recently had two NAS drives fail over three months... just snapped in a new drive.... takes about 1.5 days to re-sync, but not data loss at all... but I also had the most recent source files on the PC C and D drives.

In my main computer, I have four SSDs... (two are M.2 PCIe-4 drives and two being standard SSDs). One drive is C and is where my programs are. The D drive has all of my pictures and all lightroom files. The other two are RAID 0 and I use them for temporary files such as culling my pictures from the latest day of shooting.

Every few days, I run backups of botch C and D to the RAID NAS... then wait a few days ... then run backup of the NAS RAID to the other high capacity drives .... these high capacity drives are in their own USB cases and I attache them to the PC only when I run the backups.

The RAID NAS is also a music and media server for my home.

For my main computer C drive SSD, I clone it to yet another SSD every month or so. If the SSD should fail, I just pop it out the bad unit and install the clone. I have a little slot drive thingy on my PC so that I can snap in the SSD and out whenever I need it.

Crazy, but it all works really well.

For backup software, I use FreeFile Sync and use it to mirror my sorce drives... I don't care for the capability to restore deleted files... too complex and never needed it.

For cloning, I use Macrim.

I lost many drives over the years. I have never lost a file... ever.

Peace
Bruce in Philly



May 26, 2023 at 12:55 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Peter Figen wrote:
About two months ago I bought a new Gemini enclosure from OWC and put two Toshiba 8TB drives in it configured to a hardware RAID Level 1 array. After about thirty days I got a Tech Tool Pro warning that one of those drives was about to fail it's S.M.A.R.T. drive routines and was expected to die 20-60 times sooner than normal and to back it up as soon as possible.

It turns out that in a hardware RAID 1 array, you have a primary drive and a secondary drive where the data is written to the primary drive first
...Show more

That is not a feature of RAID 1, but a whacky implemention of a funky product. RAID 1 means write both in parallel, with some slight delays due to drive differences and caching. Typically one drive is the primary for reads. There were (or maybe still are?) some implementations that actually read from two RAID 1 drives for performance but RAID was always about availability, for example the OS drive in a server, not performance.

RAID 5/Z2 requires at least 3 drives (single distributed parity allowing one drive failure) and RAID 6/Z3 requires at least 4 drives (double distributed parity allowing one or two drive failures).

I prefer to use at least two different NASes with different drives to eliminate potential common failures like NAS hardware and OS, or hard drive models/families.

EBH





May 26, 2023 at 04:09 PM
Bruce n Philly
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


RAID 0 is about performance albeit with twice the risk of disk failure. I don't know the history... was RAID 0 an afterthought? ... but I've implemented it and it really does speed up reads and writes. I can't give you a percentage, but when it is implemented inside your machine, it is noticeable.

I think it is perfect for scratch drives... if you have a few old drives hanging around and you have a need for scratch drives like I do... for culling photos before loading into you editing software database... it is great. I keep the photos on my memory cards until I have them backed up to my NAS so if the RAID 0 drive crashes, no loss.

BTW, if you have say two one TB drives, as a RAID 0, it presents itself as one two TB drive... nice. A way to get some mileage out of those old drives. Most (?) newer mother boards support this. You set it up in your bios... check your mother board's manual.

Peace
Bruce in Philly



May 26, 2023 at 04:22 PM
 


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Peter Figen
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Bruce n Philly wrote:
RAID 0 is about performance albeit with twice the risk of disk failure. I don't know the history... was RAID 0 an afterthought? ... but I've implemented it and it really does speed up reads and writes. I can't give you a percentage, but when it is implemented inside your machine, it is noticeable.

I think it is perfect for scratch drives... if you have a few old drives hanging around and you have a need for scratch drives like I do... for culling photos before loading into you editing software database... it is great. I keep the
...Show more

You're right about using RAID 0 for scratch disks. I started doing that in the middle to later 90's and probably became aware of that because I was shooting a boatload of images for Micronet back then, but there's no real point in putting older drives back into service in RAID arrays. They're too slow and they're old. Every time I've upgraded computers it's made sense to upgrade all the RAID arrays as well, well at least the ones that are used day to day. Might as well take advantage of the newer, faster drives and enclosures and eliminate as much of the data bottleneck as you can.




May 26, 2023 at 06:23 PM
billsamuels
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


mcbroomf wrote:
Was the LR catalog itself on the HD that failed, or just the images? From what you said it sounds like the .lrcat is elsewhere.

If it's just the images then all your LR edits are OK as those edits are saved in the catalog. You said that the original raws are on an internal drive so the catalog points to them for the edits before you saved them (tiff/psd/psb etc) to the external drive.

The PS edits might be lost. I'm not sure what happens if you used smart objects and they were re-imported into the LR catalog.


YES!!! I was about to spend a lot of money to pull all my final photos off the crashed drive, but in all reality, I forgot that LR is actually storing them on the drive that had the original download, which was either the other HGST drive in the array, or the internal 12TB drive that until recently I was using for everything. The 12 TB internal drive was being used for everything until last fall, so I have all of the LR photos on that drive except for a few months, and the rest is on the working HGST drive.

I'm going to back up everything from the working HGST drive onto the 7TB external drive this weekend just to make absolute sure I have a backup of everything in case the working HGST drive is also at its end, and then I'll get an external Samsung SSD drive from Amazon and back up the 12 TB internal drive as well, which is only about 1/3 full. Thanks very much for reminding me that LR saved everything on the original disk, NOT where the final product landed. That's a life-saver!!!




May 27, 2023 at 02:17 AM
billsamuels
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


What do you guys think about for really special trips like I just returned from Europe, before I left, I had purchased a couple of new Sandisk 256GB Extreme Pro SD cards. I haven't been anywhere since Europe so the cards still have the original trip on the cards. I'm wondering for special trips like this, does anyone maintain the SD card also as an ultimate back-up where they put away the card, maybe even slide the small copyright slider on the side so it can't be overwritten? I know these cards are expensive, but so is an external hard drive. Do they lose memory if stored properly? I think the Extreme Pro are supposed to be radiation and magnetic-proof.
Another idea is I have some older Sandisk Extreme Pro's that are 64GB and some Sandisk Extreme's that are 16GB & 32GB so moving the data from the new cards onto the old ones and storing them away forever after wouldn't even be that big of a deal. Is this worth it?







May 27, 2023 at 02:31 AM
mcbroomf
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


I keep the SD cards until I'm home and the RAW content is downloaded to my working drive and all my backups. Then I re-format.


May 27, 2023 at 04:16 AM
jwpstl
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Thatís what I do. I donít think keeping a collection of SD cards with images makes as much sense as having things on a hard drive and a backup and a cloud backup.

mcbroomf wrote:
I keep the SD cards until I'm home and the RAW content is downloaded to my working drive and all my backups. Then I re-format.




May 27, 2023 at 12:44 PM
Camperjim
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Bill, sorry to hear about your issues. I have no suggestions except for contacting a data retrieval service.

After many bad experiences decades ago, I have some rules for data storage. There are some long stories that I will not go into.

First, I will not use any automated systems for backing up. I do all backups and retrievals manually.

Next, my backup drives are unplugged unless I am actually backing up or retrieving data.

I keep my primary backup drive next to my computer for ease of use. If I have an important shoot or work I really like, I backup as soon as possible and might even back up to my secondary drive. My secondary drive is stored in a firesafe in a hidden location in my basement.

Eventually I will need to free space on my computer drive and at that point I make sure to backup to my tertiary drive, which is kept in a cabinet in my detached garage.

My final rule is to replace the oldest of my three backup drives after a few years. I copy all of my files onto a new drive and move the oldest drive to basement storage.

A couple of factors make it easy to use my system. First my total storage is only about 4 Tb. I try to cull aggressively and also have a plan to clear older files when my total storage grows substantially. Second my files are stored by date with an added description of location, event or subject as appropriate. I do not use a file management system or any keywording but have my own system for locating and retrieving old files.



May 27, 2023 at 12:59 PM
billsamuels
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Camperjim wrote:
Bill, sorry to hear about your issues. I have no suggestions except for contacting a data retrieval service.

After many bad experiences decades ago, I have some rules for data storage. There are some long stories that I will not go into.

First, I will not use any automated systems for backing up. I do all backups and retrievals manually.

Next, my backup drives are unplugged unless I am actually backing up or retrieving data.

I keep my primary backup drive next to my computer for ease of use. If I have an important shoot or work I really like, I backup as soon
...Show more

That actually sounds smart. I've talked to IT people in the past where they've said that huge hard drives have a larger capacity for problems because they have to search out for data whenever you inquire for data and that search across the disk surface is wear and tear. Unfortunately, they're also convenient and people want large drives. A 4TB drive would be very conservative in size!

I've been checking out the makings of SSD drives and what makes them attractive besides the fact that there are NO moving parts, is that what eventually fails in them isn't the entire drive, but rather the "write" function. They stop writing, but they continue to read so if you use it as a purely storage drive and once you fill it up, you can access your information and as long as you don't change the data, you won't wear the drive out. So they make excellent storage drives and they have the same lifespan as a regular drive if you use it as a "C" drive. There is clock software that measures the "write" life of your SSD drive so that if you're approaching the maximum, you can either change it out or back it up before it dies, which isn't to say that at 1.5M hours of writing it's going to die, but you know that it's reaching it's max age and you can be ready.

I don't know what the final life-long solution is short of what our grandparents did, which was to print everything and put them in albums. My 95 year old cousin died earlier this year and I have boxes of photos that are over 100 years old, long before we had archival printers and paper. Even the negatives are in new condition and if I really wanted, I could probably print off the old 120mm negatives.



May 27, 2023 at 08:07 PM
Camperjim
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


billsamuels wrote:
A 4TB drive would be very conservative in size!

I don't know what the final life-long solution is short of what our grandparents did, which was to print everything and put them in albums. .


I guess I was not clear. I have roughly 4 Tb of data but I am using 8 Tb drives. That gives me a lot of excess capacity for future growth and 8 Tb drives have been affordable.

I have no idea what long term storage will be like in the future. Nor do I think it will matter for my files. As with old slides and prints, most or all of that from previous generations ends up in the trash. Certainly none of my kids or relatives are likely to have any interest in looking at or keeping terabytes worth of files. The stacks of prints are also not likely to survive very long. In order to have some of my work last for a generation or so, I have made a number of blurb books. I kept a copy, give one to each of my daughters and gave one or two away to friends.



May 27, 2023 at 09:58 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Bruce n Philly wrote:
I am a bit old fashioned in that I have a four-disk Network Attached Storage (NAS) RAID 5 (allows for a disk failure and no loss of data) on my home network. Further, I run backups of the RAID array to three different high capacity hard drives. So that is more than quadruple redundancy. I recently had two NAS drives fail over three months...
Peace
Bruce in Philly


I like your old-fashioned paranoia! No, seriously. I apply a philosophy that I picked up way back in my days as a fanatical cyclist who would commute between 20 and 55 miles per day, coming home after dark: "If you don't have enough lights that your friends laugh at you, you need more lights." So, when it comes to backups, if your friends don't laugh at what they view as the apparent paranoia of your approach you probably don't have enough backups.

Let me count:

1. A daily automated backup of my main drives (computer's internal SSD and the attached drive with all photographs) to an attached RAID 0 enclosure. This backup updates new/changed files only.

2. An hourly automated update (using Time Machine) to a server on our local network that has a large disk array that backs up all computers here. Time Machine has a special feature that allows one to "go back to" any version of a volume or individual file since the backup was first made... so if I need to recover a version of a file as it existed at 10:00PM on March 13 I can do so.

3. A periodic manual backup to a separate array of drives, also using the first method. There are two sets of drives and one is always stored off-site. Every few weeks or so I exchange the local version with the offsite version. So if the giant meteor hits our place and destroys all of our technology (yes, I will survive!), I will only lose the work done since I last exchanged offsite copies.

4. When I travel I carry a small portable drive with copies of all of my finished Photoshop files. (Nope, not ALL of the raw files... so I guess there is still room for more paranoia!) This has two benefits: I have full, local access to these files in case I need one while traveling and I have a last-resort backup of these most important of files.

So, counting my original drives (internal SSD and attached photo drive) there are always four full copies of everything plus the photoshop files on the small drive.

Also, as pointed out in the thread, drives fail. Multiple drive arrays fail is special and extra fun ways and do so more often. That's another reason to have multiple backups. One more reason for multiple backups: Imagine that your main drive fails, in a panic you realize you now have only one copy of your precious files, and in your panic you do something dumb while restoring from it and wreck your only backup. It happens.

Paranoia is a good thing. ;-)

---------------------------------------------

billsamuels wrote:
What do you guys think about for really special trips like I just returned from Europe, before I left, I had purchased a couple of new Sandisk 256GB Extreme Pro SD cards. I haven't been anywhere since Europe so the cards still have the original trip on the cards. I'm wondering for special trips like this, does anyone maintain the SD card also as an ultimate back-up where they put away the card, maybe even slide the small copyright slider on the side so it can't be overwritten? I know these cards are expensive, but so is an external hard
...Show more

I suspect that no backup medium that most of us have access to is a "forever" solution. A combination of using the most reliable methods available to us, having multiple backups, and (I believe) using more than one backup method are probably the best bet.

So stashing some most important files away on extra cards isn't a bad idea in some ways, and you might be able to find something there years from now if all of your main backups somehow failed... but I think it is probably best to focus on flexible and redundant regular backups.

Speaking of travel, given the potential for loss, theft, or damage to cards and other gear when traveling, I think it is a good idea to have a redundant approach while on the road, too. Even on long trips I try to carry sufficient card storage that I'll never have to erase a card or delete files from it in order to get more space. As many of you probably do, I use cameras that have dual cards, and I write my duplicate raw files to both cards in case of a card problem. Periodically ó daily if possible ó†I transfer the raw files to the laptop that I usually carry when traveling. I also carry a small backup drive to backup the laptop. (If you are counting, there are four copies of all photo files at this point.)

It won't always work, but I'm considering the possibility of doing daily cloud backups while traveling when connectivity permits. That's not, in my view, a realistic option when using only a phone connection, but with access to a decent wireless network (the word "decent" is doing a lot of work here, as travelers will recognize) it could work. Since I'd use my 2TB iCloud account, this has the added advantage of automatically transferring the files to any other computers that are connected to that account... including my computers back at home. (There are some potential issues, too, but I'll spare you.)

Dan




May 28, 2023 at 09:35 AM
Camperjim
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · Hard Drive Crashed w/"best" Pix on it


Speaking of travel....

Many of my trips are quite long, usually 3-4 months in an RV visiting scenic areas and shooting daily. I carry a laptop as the first stop for downloading. I also have 2 duplicate 4 Tb portable drives for additional backup. I usually download and backup daily. If not daily, then every few days and before deleting from my memory cards.

I am no longer using my laptop for processing, but I do review my work and cull out the garbage. That saves considerable time when I return and start processing.



May 28, 2023 at 01:10 PM
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