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Photography gear storage in home

  
 
GreggNY
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Photography gear storage in home


As of now, Iíve just had my photo gear on shelves in a closet, but need to make space in there for other things. I started looking at storage chests, lockers, etc and came across humidity controlled cabinets from Ruggard. Iíve never heard of these, and was wondering if anyone uses one? Worth it? I live in the northeast US so not excessively humid but there arenít many other photography specific storage options. Iíd love to see some examples of in home storage solutions if anyone is willing to throw out any other suggestions. As of now, Iím shooting sony with 2 bodies, and 6 or so lenses with one being the 600/4 so that would have to fit. Ability to keep a tripod and couple backpacks would be a bonus but not necessary. Thanks in advance!


Nov 23, 2022 at 04:58 PM
Cinstance
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Photography gear storage in home


I have 4 Ruggard cabinets and have been using them for 5 years. The 80L version can hold a 600 f4 with no problem. The big 230L single zone version should work too and will have more room for the rest of your gear.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1457515-STUD/ruggard_edc_230l_electronic_dry_cabinet_230l.html/specs



Nov 23, 2022 at 05:08 PM
chez
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Photography gear storage in home


Unless you truly require a humidity controlled cabinet, I would just get any old cabinet to store your gear. I surely would not spend over $500 unless I needed the humidity control...which I highly doubt you would.

Hit craigslist. Get a nice furniture grade cabinet with doors for $50...done.



Nov 23, 2022 at 06:08 PM
GreggNY
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Photography gear storage in home


Cinstance wrote:
I have 4 Ruggard cabinets and have been using them for 5 years. The 80L version can hold a 600 f4 with no problem. The big 230L single zone version should work too and will have more room for the rest of your gear.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1457515-STUD/ruggard_edc_230l_electronic_dry_cabinet_230l.html/specs


Thanks for the feedback. They are nice looking and Iím sure theyíll do the job. Couldnít hurt to have the humidity control as an option too. Iíll have to see if itís worth the cost for me



Nov 23, 2022 at 11:18 PM
GreggNY
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Photography gear storage in home


chez wrote:
Unless you truly require a humidity controlled cabinet, I would just get any old cabinet to store your gear. I surely would not spend over $500 unless I needed the humidity control...which I highly doubt you would.

Hit craigslist. Get a nice furniture grade cabinet with doors for $50...done.


I havenít needed humidity control with anything yet so Iím sure youíre right. It would definitely be a Ďnice to haveí over a Ďneed to have.í A nice simple wooden storage chest or cabinet is definitely a more appealing option cost wise



Nov 23, 2022 at 11:20 PM
Cinstance
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Photography gear storage in home


In my experience, constant humidity does have noticeable benefit in maintaining the condition of camera lenses. My lenses, some of them are over a decade old, still look sparkling new since I always have some kind of humidity control over my gears. Before using the dry cabinets, I always kept them in big backpacks with silica dry packs when not in use.

By comparison, my wife does not care and always keeps her gear in a camera backpack with no humidity control. I often joke that my 20 years old Zeiss lens looks newer than her 2 years old Canon .



Nov 23, 2022 at 11:46 PM
sjms
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Photography gear storage in home


for the past 10 or so years i have been using a Pelican 1660 case primarily and some smaller ones for other goods.


Nov 24, 2022 at 06:02 AM
cseelye
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Photography gear storage in home


I use an office supply steel cabinet that has double doors, is lockable and has five shelves. Each shelf is dedicated- cleaning and heads; lenses; bodies, body accessories + 500 f4; filters, lighting, misc. accessories; obsolete gear not yet sold, backpack.

For the first time I have all my gear in one place, organized so I can quickly grab what I need, items stored such that forgetting an item is minimized, and reasonably theft proof.
I purchased the cabinet at a liquidator for something like $40.



Nov 24, 2022 at 01:08 PM
Bacalhau
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Photography gear storage in home


I bet there is some gizmo able to measure air humidity accurately - then best approach can be taken; for instance a cabinet in the spare room might only need a couple rechargeable disiccants inside ...


Nov 24, 2022 at 04:55 PM
sjms
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Photography gear storage in home


a simple hygrometer.


Nov 24, 2022 at 09:03 PM
 


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Imagemaster
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Photography gear storage in home


Lived in the Pacific Northwest for over 70 years and never had a problem with humidity affecting photo gear stored in any of my homes.

Why would I let excessive humidity in my home be a problem in the first place?



Nov 24, 2022 at 09:12 PM
Bacalhau
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Photography gear storage in home



Imagemaster wrote:
Lived in the Pacific Northwest for over 70 years and never had a problem with humidity affecting photo gear stored in any of my homes.

Why would I let excessive humidity in my home be a problem in the first place?

exactly - but what you might not feel in your bones, could still be "fatal" to camera gear (more likely old lenses, I would expect)
So it's a dehumidifier cabinet a waste? maybe, maybe not, but if my house was showing obvious signs of humidity in the walls and elsewhere, I would put my money on fixing (edit) that house and humidity issue first



Edited on Nov 25, 2022 at 11:13 AM · View previous versions



Nov 24, 2022 at 10:26 PM
Imagemaster
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Photography gear storage in home


Bacalhau wrote:
on that fixing first


Fixing what first? If humidity was affecting ceilings and walls, my first priority would be the whole home and everything in it, not just camera gear. Or if photo gear is your first priority, it is easy enough to just dehumidify the room you keep your photo gear in.

Once again, over 70 years in the lower mainland of British Columbia and nary a problem with humidity affecting any of my photo gear, including old lenses. Not a single fatality.



Nov 24, 2022 at 10:34 PM
GreggNY
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Photography gear storage in home


OP here. Just to clarify, I wasnít thinking I had any issue with humidity where I live. Most of you guys just reaffirmed my thinking that humidity control definitely isnít necessary. Iím sure it couldnít hurt, but I think Iíll save quite a few bucks and shop for a nice chest/cabinet/locker setup.


Nov 24, 2022 at 11:46 PM
justashooter
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Photography gear storage in home


My daily used gear stays in my rolling bag. If my gear gets damp/wet when covering an assignment (baseball, football, etc.) it get toweled off, if possible, and when I get home the bag is opened up, lens caps come off and a fan is turned on it overnight. Other than that, if you are uncomfortable you probably have the AC or the heat on and that is all your gear needs. My secondary used gear is in a metal cabinet with the shelves lined with carpet remnants. Plenty of air circulation for all.


Nov 25, 2022 at 12:19 AM
schlotz
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Photography gear storage in home


Most of my gear is kept in a large pelican roller case. Only a couple of lenses are on one of the office shelves.


Nov 25, 2022 at 09:23 AM
EB-1
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Photography gear storage in home


GreggNY wrote:
OP here. Just to clarify, I wasnít thinking I had any issue with humidity where I live. Most of you guys just reaffirmed my thinking that humidity control definitely isnít necessary. Iím sure it couldnít hurt, but I think Iíll save quite a few bucks and shop for a nice chest/cabinet/locker setup.


Some of those boxes are just heaters, not dehumidifiers. Get a couple of digital hygrometers and check the storage areas. Below 50%RH is just fine. I've always maintained average humidity inside my homes <40% and never had issues.

EBH



Nov 25, 2022 at 10:32 AM
Bacalhau
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Photography gear storage in home




Imagemaster wrote:
Fixing what first? If humidity was affecting ceilings and walls, my first priority would be the whole home and everything in it, not just camera gear. Or if photo gear is your first priority, it is easy enough to just dehumidify the room you keep your photo gear in.

Once again, over 70 years in the lower mainland of British Columbia and nary a problem with humidity affecting any of my photo gear, including old lenses. Not a single fatality.

typing from the phone, seems something got cut - yes, fixing the house first



Nov 25, 2022 at 11:11 AM
jeetsukumaran
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Photography gear storage in home


OTOH, having lived in the tropics for years, you can watch fungus grow live hour to hour under the right circumstances in uncontrolled circumstance. It's not a problem if you use your gear everyday. But 48-72 hours undisturbed in the dark, and then the risk becomes appreciable. And you lenses are never the same after a fungus repair. So, I'm with Team-Dehumidify!

And as far as the home goes, you *could* go full 100% biosphere sealed off isolation chamber with air conditioning. I guess. But sometimes you don't have a choice -- the older houses I lived in, traditional tropical design, were simply not built to be so closed -- e.g., the walls and eaves have channels and holes to allow airflow. And UGH: it would be so ... gauche ... to shut out the tropical breezes that naturally cool the house down after the rains (the scent of the earth after a heavy shower, petrichor, is soooo wonderful!). As a side note: back then, most of my photography was in rainforests and swamps. There I used air-tight boxes + dessicant. Much cheaper, and very portable. Did the trick as well. Though here, even with 100% humidity, paradoxically I wasn't as worried about fungus as the gear was always in use. Added bonus: simply giving time for the electronics to dry out. Flash fritzes out, pop it in the dry box for 20 mins, and back to action.

Now in San Diego, the humidity control is not necessary, but I still use a dry box out of PTSD habit, and also the humidity seals do a good job of keeping dust at bay too. But of course, there's lots of other things that work as well.



Nov 25, 2022 at 04:54 PM







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