Home · Register · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username  

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       end
  

Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?

  
 
rscheffler
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


POTOMAN wrote:
rsheffler, can you elaborate on this newer Canon hood locking feature? Not sure I know what it is.


The hoods of some of the newer Canon lenses - it might actually now be all, but my newest lens is the 85/1.4L IS - that attach with a bayonet mount, have a button/tab you depress to then rotate and remove the hood. The 50/1.4 is not one of these lenses. Until recently Canon's bayonet mounted hoods were all held in place by friction and were generally quite tight. But I guess some had problems with them, or it's a case of a designer deciding to 'improve' a product. So now those with the lock tab mount very easily with a relatively loose fit. The problem is if the lock tab breaks or is bumped, or whatever, then the hood can rotate off very easily and be lost. So far I haven't had this happen, but a friend has. Perhaps the worst hood design was some of the early EF lenses that had clip on hoods, such as the 85/1.2, which weren't exactly the most secure fit.



Jul 05, 2022 at 07:54 PM
POTOMAN
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


nputtick wrote:
I have a genuine Canon ES71-II hood and it is flocked inside. Itís a simple twist bayonet fit.


We now officially know there are genuine Canon ES-71 II hoods that are indeed flocked! Thank you! That's helpful.

Sorry by the way for the delay intervals in my replies guys, it appears my newer account still has some sort of post time limitation.

Edited on Jul 05, 2022 at 10:00 PM · View previous versions



Jul 05, 2022 at 09:43 PM
POTOMAN
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


rscheffler wrote:
Back a while ago, probably on the Alt board, there were discussions about adapting lenses on the early mirrorless cameras. Some of the lens adapters had poor internal stray reflection control. One of the solutions was to buy sheets of flocking and glue it in place. Along this line, this might be interesting: https://www.ko-pro.black/lensfood/ (yes, that's a typo in the link address, but probably because it's a Japan-based site). They don't offer a pre-cut option for the ES-71, but you could just buy their sheets and do it yourself: https://www.ko-pro.black/product/fs-sp/. They also sell what they claim is the world's blackest
...Show more

Interesting that there is such a large market for hood flocking, I would have never guessed. The ultimate black paint intrigues me, as I may prefer that option for reasons outlined above. Very useful information.

Edited on Jul 05, 2022 at 10:05 PM · View previous versions



Jul 05, 2022 at 09:46 PM
POTOMAN
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


I still have interest in the original ES-71 as I may prefer a non flocked hood for my 50 1.4.

Reason being is the camera it's going to be mounted on is meant to be a cheap, stress free, minimal maintenance, take everywhere, and shoot SOOC jpegs type setup (5D + 50 1.4). Not having to clean a lens hood often would make a difference to me.

Basically, I want the stress free character of point and shoot "convenience" without the downsides of point and shoot quality. With the ability to shoot in manual of course.

I'm in touch with some ES-71 version I sellers, will know regarding the possible lack of flocking soon.

Edited on Jul 06, 2022 at 12:40 PM · View previous versions



Jul 05, 2022 at 10:04 PM
garyvot
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


Late to this thread, but can confirm the mark II hood is flocked.

The main thing I wanted to add is that use of either of these hoods (or a compatible third party knock off) is highly recommended with this lens in particular to protect the exposed front focusing group from mechanical damage.



Jul 05, 2022 at 10:57 PM
 


Search in Used Dept. 

jrhoffman75
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


Amazon has a third party version for $9. Can always return if quality isn't up to your liking.


Jul 06, 2022 at 06:58 AM
artsupreme
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


jrhoffman75 wrote:
Amazon has a third party version for $9. Can always return if quality isn't up to your liking.


The two I linked on the previous page were less than $8 and work fine. Meanwhile the OP is spending all sorts of time searching for something that can be delivered next day for $7.49



Jul 06, 2022 at 10:39 AM
POTOMAN
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


Gochugogi wrote:
I've bought many JJC hood over the years: 85% of Canon quality at 25% of Canon's price. I usually need to use fine sandpaper (1000 grit+) to smooth the hood's mount surface for an easy fit. Otherwise they tend to go on hard and gritty.


Good to know the specifics, that is useful info. Had you not posted I would have held JJC hood fitment quality in higher regard.

---------------------------------------------

rscheffler wrote:
The hoods of some of the newer Canon lenses - it might actually now be all, but my newest lens is the 85/1.4L IS - that attach with a bayonet mount, have a button/tab you depress to then rotate and remove the hood. The 50/1.4 is not one of these lenses. Until recently Canon's bayonet mounted hoods were all held in place by friction and were generally quite tight. But I guess some had problems with them, or it's a case of a designer deciding to 'improve' a product. So now those with the lock tab mount very easily with
...Show more

I do not believe I have seen this newer style mount. I think the only canon lenses I have handled with hoods are the 24/1.4LII, 50/1.8 II, and the 85/1.2LII. I believe my 50/1.8II did have the older clip on style that you're describing. I actually used to "bump" the crap out of that one while it swung from my shoulder at busy events, never had an issue with it coming off! My plastic fantastic did however eventually snap in half. That was indeed a sad day for my first love... Learned my lesson that day as to why you sometimes need to carry spare gear.
---------------------------------------------

garyvot wrote:
Late to this thread, but can confirm the mark II hood is flocked.

The main thing I wanted to add is that use of either of these hoods (or a compatible third party knock off) is highly recommended with this lens in particular to protect the exposed front focusing group from mechanical damage.


Tell me how I know...

---------------------------------------------

artsupreme wrote:
The two I linked on the previous page were less than $8 and work fine. Meanwhile the OP is spending all sorts of time searching for something that can be delivered next day for $7.49


This thread is about identifying the difference(s) between the genuine Canon ES-71 and ES-71 II lens hoods. We've inevitably naturally nerded off into various related Canon EF lens hood discussions. Not that there's anything wrong with that.



Jul 06, 2022 at 01:01 PM
rscheffler
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Canon ES-71 vs ES-71 II Lens Hoods: What's the Difference?


POTOMAN wrote:
Interesting that there is such a large market for hood flocking, I would have never guessed.


I believe the lens hood flocking market is incidental to other more demanding applications, such as reducing internal reflections in cameras, lenses, lens adapters, telescopes, etc., which become much more problematic when doing very long exposures, especially in relatively bright ambient light environments with very strong ND filters (lens mount light leaks are a problem). In one of the links I posted earlier, one of the specified photographic applications was for adding flocking to DSLR mirror boxes to reduce internal reflections. And I'm sure there are other technical/scientific applications. I did find it cool though that someone used the flocking material on a car to make the 'world's blackest car.'



Jul 06, 2022 at 01:32 PM
1      
2
       end






FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username      Reset password