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Struggle for Existence

  
 
Shasoc
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Struggle for Existence


When a baby bird falls off the nest there is not much (nothing) the parents can do to save that bird. So, they are left to their fate: death. Sometimes a cruel one.

These pics can make us recognize that Nature sometimes can be cruel. That is because we see Nature mostly as beautiful landscapes or healthy, photogenic wild animals.

For us “sensitive humans”, it is extremely hard to accept the brutality of the natural world because we interpret nature in terms of our own psychology, our own judgment of what we consider good or bad.
Recognizing that , most often we end up saying: “Well, that is Nature!”

But that makes me think. Just because it’s natural does it mean it’s not bad?.

Socrate













Jun 20, 2022 at 03:47 PM
EverLearning
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Struggle for Existence


That is quite the duo of photos Socrate! I like what you wrote too.

I think when it comes to getting food, it isn't bad or good. It just is. But actually, an argument can be made for "good", even if "cruel". I remember a biologist asking if we knew why there were less passerines in Yellowstone National Park. A few guesses, but nobody knew. His explanation was that since wolves were all but extirpated from the park, elk populations exploded. The elk stripped the smaller trees and thus destroyed nesting habitats. Wolves were reintroduced in 1995, a suitable level of elk was eventually arrived at and the bird population grew.

The alligators protect the nesting birds from racoons and other predators, but every once in a while a "price" is paid. You did a great job of capturing this situation; good (for the alligator) or bad (for the bird) as it may be. The blur of the alligator in the first image really conveys a sense of motion, and therefore doom for the young bird; which is confirmed in the second image. Well done!

Don



Jun 20, 2022 at 08:55 PM
Shasoc
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Struggle for Existence


EverLearning wrote:
That is quite the duo of photos Socrate! I like what you wrote too.

I think when it comes to getting food, it isn't bad or good. It just is. But actually, an argument can be made for "good", even if "cruel". I remember a biologist asking if we knew why there were less passerines in Yellowstone National Park. A few guesses, but nobody knew. His explanation was that since wolves were all but extirpated from the park, elk populations exploded. The elk stripped the smaller trees and thus destroyed nesting habitats. Wolves were reintroduced in 1995, a suitable level of
...Show more

Thanks, Don. All happened so quick that I didn't have time to set the camera.

Yes Nature can be a cruel mistress The Nature's cycle of life shows a different side of Nature. Not the prettiest but it is realistic. Somebody must die for somebody else to live. Yep, it's cruel out there. It's just "part of nature."

However, when comes to cruelty nothing surpasses the cruelty of us “sensitive humans” towards Nature. I can show different pics where human cruelty is manifested in various forms most often explainable with stupidity.

Socrate



Jun 20, 2022 at 10:03 PM
EverLearning
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Struggle for Existence


Socrate, your last paragraph sure hits the nail on the head! The only thing I would change is to say "...towards Nature and other humans."

Almost without exception, other animals kill to eat, to avoid being eaten or to protect their young. Wish we could say that about humans.

Don



Jun 21, 2022 at 10:06 AM
 


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lylejk
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Struggle for Existence


All I can say is dinner. lol

Nice one, Socrate.



Jun 21, 2022 at 10:08 PM
Shasoc
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Struggle for Existence


lylejk wrote:
All I can say is dinner. lol

Nice one, Socrate.


Thanks Lyle. I don't think the gator got too much meat though
Socrate



Jun 22, 2022 at 09:14 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Struggle for Existence


Nice capture.

And when the newly hatched sea turtles are racing for the water ... it might be the birds turn for breakfast.

In the intricate mechanisms of biological cycles, the range includes the seemingly passive consumption of plankton by whales to the powerful jaws of apex predators. While the food chain is part of the existence experience, it seems that humans have a greater sensitivity to those which display power, than those which appear more passive.

A robin, picking up a worm out of the ground gets perceived much differently than a flock of gulls wreaking havoc on the hatchlings. And yet, whether it is a great white and seals, lions and gazelles, gators and birds, birds and worms, or whales and plankton (et al), it is part of the cycle ... even to the point of including caterpillars consuming leaves.

Seeing one insect, eat a leaf evokes a far different emotive than seeing the massive power displayed in a swarm of insects destroying plants and crops.

Our perspectives on what evokes strong emotion ... it seems that somehow the display of power in the cycle is challenging for some to digest. Compare with those which are seemingly more gentle, like watching a koala, panda or giraffe eat leaves. The cycle is the cycle ... and has a myriad of variations in how it is manifest ... and humans have a range of emotive response as a witness.

Which begs the question ...



Jun 23, 2022 at 12:06 AM
Shasoc
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Struggle for Existence


RustyBug wrote:
Nice capture.

And when the newly hatched sea turtles are racing for the water ... it might be the birds turn for breakfast.

In the intricate mechanisms of biological cycles, the range includes the seemingly passive consumption of plankton by whales to the powerful jaws of apex predators. While the food chain is part of the existence experience, it seems that humans have a greater sensitivity to those which display power, than those which appear more passive.

A robin, picking up a worm out of the ground gets perceived much differently than a flock of gulls wreaking havoc on the hatchlings.
...Show more



Thanks, Kent.

Socrate



Jun 24, 2022 at 09:08 AM







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