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Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject

  
 
anselwannab
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


I've been trying slower shutter speeds to get blurred moving subjects to highlight the movement that is lost when you shoot fast shutter speeds. Camera in a fixed/tripod position so the background stays sharp, but People moving in a crowd will be blurred.

Thinking of things like Trent Parke and some of his street shots.

What I notice is that the longer the shutter speed, the less 'dense' the moving objects are. Longer exposures, less density?

Is that just physics?
Does it matter if the person is darker or lighter in tone?
Does negative film differ from electronic sensor?

I could light off a strobe/flash to 'fix' the person to a certian degree at the start or end.

The big picture is that I'm trying to convey the movement and dynamic nature of some scences in a still photograph.

Mainly doing this when I travel. Fuji 100X on a little gorilla warp/tripod and using my phone/fuji-app to release the shutter.

Is it just getting the lighting and the shutter-exposure right? Anything in post?



Feb 18, 2022 at 11:00 AM
Paul_K
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


Looked the images by Trent Parke you refer to and what strikes me is that the technique apparantly used seems, based on my own experiences (see below), to be the exact opposite of that you say you're using (camera static on a trpod using longish shutter speeds to 'capture' the movement of the subject)

Trent Parke images remind me of catwalk and event images Scott Heiser shot in the 80's for e.g. andy Warhol's 'Interview Magazine', (and whose work is featured in the collections of the Delaware Art Museum https://emuseum.delart.org/people/1120/scott-heiser/objects ).

At that time (early 80's) it inspired me to try and emulate his style in some of the catwalk shows I shot at that time (obviously on film). But while I personally quite liked my results ,















the designers whose shows I shot definitely didn't, and I consequently returned to shooting the 'normal' way for commercial/paid jobs.

Contrary to your settings, I used to shoot hand held, not on a tripod, using a longish shutter speed, while moving the camera along with the movement of the subject.
If I were to repeat that with a digital body nowadays, I would notchange much, if anything, from that.
And definitely not resort to some post processing trick to try get the desired result (after all, we're talking about photography, not digital effects )



Feb 19, 2022 at 05:38 AM
story_teller
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


It's all trial and error, but highly lit scenes provide the best opportunity for initial success and learning. You can show motion with just the slight blur of a leg or make the whole person almost unrecognizable. I'm not sure which you are trying to accomplish. You can always put the camera into 2nd curtain sync and use flash, but that may disrupt your subjects. Even then, you have to adjust the camera settings to the specific environment.

In answer to a couple of your questions -

"What I notice is that the longer the shutter speed, the less 'dense' the moving objects are. Longer exposures, less density?" Yes, if you use a sufficiently long shutter speed the people in motion can "disappear".

"Does it matter if the person is darker or lighter in tone?" Depends on the background. You need contrast between the subject and the background.

"Does negative film differ from electronic sensor?" I would use a digital camera first to learn and then apply the knowledge to a film camera. Film has a fixed ASA, so that difference needs to be accounted for.

It will come down to multiple factors -
- how much light in the scene and where is it coming from?
- is the background light or dark? A lighter background will show off darker clothing and visa versa.
- how fast are the subjects moving and are they moving across the frame, toward you, etc?
- how much blur do you want?
- where do you focus and what is your depth of field?
- what ISO's do you need? That will be important so you understand what ASA film speed you will use.

Here's an article to get you started -
https://www.nyip.edu/photo-articles/photography-tutorials/three-techniques-for-capturing-motion-in-photography



Feb 19, 2022 at 09:36 AM
anselwannab
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject



Specifically, i was talking about Trent Parke’s from the Minutes to Midnight collection “Hunter Street”, “Workers on George Street City center “, “Sydney, market place, moving bus”

https://www.streetshootr.com/video-trent-parke-on-making-minutes-to-midnight/

I just watched a video of Trent, and I think he was talking about the ‘Moving Bus” shot that he took many, many times to get all the elements he wanted. The moving bus, the still people’s shadow’s on the moving bus.

I’m interested in getting the flow of time, a still image that has the elements of movement.



Edited on Feb 19, 2022 at 07:07 PM · View previous versions



Feb 19, 2022 at 04:37 PM
MRomine
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


story_teller pretty much covered in his post above the principles on how to achieve various kinds of stop motion, dragging the shutter, rear and front flash sync etc.

I love playing with these techniques.

These are pretty much on camera flash, drag the shutter while moving the camera with mixed in off-camera flash.
































Feb 19, 2022 at 06:42 PM
MRomine
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


Then doing the same technique but with nature subjects. Not everyone's cup of tea but I enjoy playing with it.

















Feb 19, 2022 at 06:44 PM
anselwannab
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


MRonnie- great shots. Interesting take on the technique with the nature shots.

And yes, that NYIP article is excellent.

I got bored with taking shots at my son’s LAX games with frozen motion, so I started panning with a slow shutter speed in the transition portion of the game with the middies. You get a feel for the speed that just isn’t there blowing away at 14 FPS at F2.8 and fast shutter speeds.

I need to get more comfortable with flash to ‘tack’ down the subject to add some specificity and direction.


Fun, fun, fun.



Feb 19, 2022 at 07:13 PM
 


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rico
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


MRomine wrote:
These are pretty much on camera flash, drag the shutter while moving the camera with mixed in off-camera flash.

Wow, excellent results!



Feb 19, 2022 at 09:51 PM
MRomine
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


rico wrote:
Wow, excellent results!


Thank you kindly.




Feb 20, 2022 at 09:45 AM
bjhurley
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


Jim Kasson has done some really amazing photos that use these blur effects:

https://www.kasson.com/gallery/

Check out in particular the "Staccato" series, the "Nighthawks," and the "Green Growing Land." Some of these were taken by panning from a slow-moving car.

I'm particularly interested in showing motion blur in photos of musicians playing; I've never much liked stop-action shots of musicians because movement is such a key element in music-making.



Feb 21, 2022 at 03:30 PM
anselwannab
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


bjhurley wrote:
Jim Kasson has done some really amazing photos that use these blur effects:

https://www.kasson.com/gallery/

Check out in particular the "Staccato" series, the "Nighthawks," and the "Green Growing Land." Some of these were taken by panning from a slow-moving car.

I'm particularly interested in showing motion blur in photos of musicians playing; I've never much liked stop-action shots of musicians because movement is such a key element in music-making.


I liked Nighthawks over Staccato. Staccato is a bit more interpretive than what I'm looking for. "Alone in a Crowd"- WOW! That is what I'm referring to. Clear backgrounds and moving people. That collection is really impressive. They are all technically very strong, and the compositions and juxtapositioning of subjects/content are sublime. Some are just- what/how is that done?

This one specifically.

https://www.kasson.com/gallery/alone-in-a-crowd/#gallery/633/46

But that whole album is worth a look. Sublime.



Feb 23, 2022 at 01:31 AM
MRomine
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


anselwannab wrote:
Some are just- what/how is that done?


Most of what I looked at are simply a stationary camera and long exposure. The photographer wrote that his exposures ranged from 1/4-1/15 sec. while he leaned or braced himself against something while shooting..



Feb 23, 2022 at 07:52 AM
anselwannab
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Slow-shutter speed for blurred movement without losing subject


Found a YouTube Video about this kind of technique,

https://youtu.be/V88QxWLlVmM



Apr 26, 2022 at 06:33 PM







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