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Archive 2022 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022

  
 
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


I'm still obsessed with Florida dreamscapes, waves and waterways!
I am beyond glad I met my wife online September of 2016, and ended up moving to Florida December of 2017! It took a while to adjust (being from Oregon) but now I wish I had lived here my whole life!

Details: The first shot was take with the Sony A7R2, Canon 70-200@200mm, f/32, 0.4 second, 100 ISO.

Technique: I intentionally panned the camera with the waves during a brilliant sunrise for that slight painterly, in-camera, slight motion effect.

Processing:

1. Of course, I only process using Adobes Raw on Raw Ultimate Quality Workflow for the highest bit-depth and truly lossless processing/editing. This means avoiding adjustment layers and smart object layers as far into workflow as possible (those are not lossless) choosing instead to use Raw on Raw layers in Photoshop - through Lightroom or Camera Raw (I use them both) as far as possible. Choosing to work in Adobes 32-bit working space (as far as possible) has additional benefits as well.

2. I also always start out with a Raw Linear Profile (several shocking FREE videos on my youtube page going out today about this) for even more quality benefits (including getting sometimes 3+ stops of light back, doubling, tripling and even more the quality). Making a Linear Profile for your specific camera for use in Lightroom or Camera Raw takes only seconds. I know some people give these out, but I advise just making your own. It's so easy a child can do it, and there are some great benefits of knowing how (you can make all kinds of profiles).

3. Then if I want to push quality even higher, I ALWAYS make sure you choose the "Raw Details" option in Lightroom or Camera Raw, but NOT the Super Resolution (NOT super!). This produces a more detailed, less noise, much higher color fidelity image with better demosaicing!

Note: Lastly, that "Print Talk #3" interview with awesome fine art gallery landscape photographer Marlon Holden will also be out! Sorry about the delay.

Enjoy.









Atlantic Dreamscape







First morning out the window of my bedroom - via iPhone







My wife Sabrina and I







My office Window and YouTube Studio Backdrop! 👍🏼




Feb 07, 2022 at 01:28 PM
Rajan Parrikar
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Superb, the dreamscape.

And congratulations on finding the woman of your dreams.

Tony Kuyper has a database of Linear Profiles made for specific camera and I use those. I would like to take a look at your processing workflow sometime.



Feb 07, 2022 at 01:34 PM
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Rajan Parrikar wrote:
Superb, the dreamscape.

And congratulations on finding the woman of your dreams.

Tony Kuyper has a database of Linear Profiles made for specific camera and I use those. I would like to take a look at your processing workflow sometime.



Thank you so much Rajan! Yes, Tony does, but I think it much better to just make your own!
It only takes seconds to make and you do not have to give your email information away to to it. So easy! Robert Park and I have been advocating for Linear Profiles for a long time now, especially on our Ultimate Print Workshop.
Plus, you can make all kinds of profiles for Lightroom/Camera Raw. Like you can make camera matching profiles to model other cameras! Or film. You can make the best Black and White profiles ever making Lightroom/Camera Raw (when including Raw Layers in Photoshop) then BEST place to make Black and Whites on the planet!

*What some people miss is this: 1/2 of all the quality data in our precious photo files is in the SINGLE BRIGHTEST STOP OF LIGHT at linear capture. When using a Linear Raw Profile, we get ALL our data back unadulterated! Adobe can literally chop off as much as 2-3+ stops of light with their standard profiles (see the FREE Video). It is shocking!

For those who may not know, this is NOT merely about more dynamic range or better handling Raw Files. If even a single stop is cut off by Adobe (GOOD BYE 1/2 of all the quality - 1/2 of all the data!). AND, 1/2 of ALL the data remaining in the Raw file is now in the SINGLE REMAINING BRIGHTEST STOP. This means many images near clipping take a GARGANTUAN quality hits, let alone dynamic range. The shocking example in my Free Youtube Video (going out today) I estimate at 2-3 stops of data loss! It goes from gross and clipped in about 20% of the highlights (no-matter what Adobe Profile used) to clean and great. And I get it all back, AND the file quality triples in quality easily.

Not only that, Adobe can and often does a whole laundry list of adjustments on their profiles, some of which are damaging. When we have to be undoing adjustments BAKED INTO THE RAW FILES (some cannot be undone) that come up in Adobe, it's backwards really, and really not a great place to start. I might occasionally use some Adobe Profiles in some of the layers of my Raw Layer Stack for some specific reason, but it is almost NEVER the base layer. Almost never. When we do a deep dive into what Adobe can do (undisclosed) to images under the hood, baked into the Raw File before arriving in Lightroom (even though all the sliders say "0") it is sometime appalling.

I do teach all this and a lot more is coming out...

Thank you for your compliment and congrats! All the best!




Feb 07, 2022 at 02:03 PM
junglialoh
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Thanks to detail information sharing that educate us in curiosity.
Images are quite remarkable and impressive with awe.



Feb 07, 2022 at 02:14 PM
Bill Gass
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Really liking the first one, beautiful pix and workflow.
One hell of a studio backdrop.



Feb 07, 2022 at 03:33 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Mark Metternich wrote:
This means avoiding adjustment layers and smart object layers as far into workflow as possible (those are not lossless) choosing instead to use Raw on Raw layers in Photoshop,,,


That bit of your post perplexes me. Perhaps you can explain.

1. Smart object layers at least insofar as they are raw file insertions from ACR are, indeed, lossless. The full original raw image data is retained at all times. My approach is to insert raw files into smart layers in PS directly, which maintains the ability to edit the raw data directly in ACR using its powerful non-destructive and lossless editing features. (These features have just received an important upgrade with the new masking controls in ACR... and in Lightroom.)

2. Adjustment layers are normally also lossless, as they retain the underlying image data (in this case the original raw image referenced by the smart object) and apply changes to that original data non-destructively and without altering it in the raw file source.

For example, I can apply a curve in ACR before importing the raw file as a smart object and then return to ACR to further adjust the curve (or any other parameter) as needed losslessly. Nothing is ever lost and no change in necessarily permanent. Or I could add a curve layer above the smart object layer in Photoshop and adjust the curve in PS without altering the actual image data in the smart layer.

I'm wondering what I might be misunderstanding in your descriptions.

Also, "raw on raw layer" is not a term I've heard before, and an internet search doesn't turn anything up. The only thing I can think of is maybe you are referring to the ability to convert a layer to a smart object inside Photoshop, which means that you can then use the ACR-style raw editing tools on it? Perhaps you can enlighten us about "raw on raw layers?"

BTW, feel free to open a new thread in the post-processing forum to answer if you prefer.

Nice textures on the water in the ocean image, and useful concept to pan with the wave.

Dan



Feb 07, 2022 at 05:31 PM
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


gdanmitchell wrote:
That bit of your post perplexes me. Perhaps you can explain.

1. Smart object layers at least insofar as they are raw file insertions from ACR are, indeed, lossless. The full original raw image data is retained at all times. My approach is to insert raw files into smart layers in PS directly, which maintains the ability to edit the raw data directly in ACR using its powerful non-destructive and lossless editing features. (These features have just received an important upgrade with the new masking controls in ACR... and in Lightroom.)

2. Adjustment layers are normally also lossless, as they
...Show more

Thank you Dan for the compliment on the image. ✌🏼

Although, likely like my last image that I started to explain a bit of this, and then had you and a few people wanting to debate, I will not debate here. People who want to debate or get more information can gladly PM me. Thank you


But for the curious reader/follower I will explain just a bit of it:

YES, you are correct, a Raw Smart Object (Adobe calls a variety of things in Photoshop "Smart Objects") is a Raw Layer. When we open a Raw image from Lightroom (or Camera Raw) by choosing "Open in Photoshop as a Smart Object" (Lightroom) or "Open Object" (Camera Raw) is Raw. The processing/computation is done in the lossless highest bit depth computation space of Camera Raw.

A "Gaussian Blur" Smart Object, for example, no, is not done in the lossless highest bit depth computation space of Camera Raw. It is done in Photoshop to a rasterized layer. Neither are Adjustment Layers done in the lossless highest bit depth computation space of Camera Raw (even if the bottom layer in the stack is a Raw Smart Object, and the aforementioned adjustments are applied as layers above the Raw Smart Object Layer). Both are lossy adjustments done to the image after it is flattened (rasterized). This is pixel editing, not parametric editing. Each individual set of those instructions becomes lossy when they are applied (each one individually) to the flattened Rasterized pixel data. Raw Editing vs Rasterized Pixel editing are two different beasts.

The first, Raw on Raw (or one could call it "Raw Layers" - or "using multiple Raw Smart Object layers") works by doing the adjustments on multi Raw Files, by double clicking on the Raw Smart Object Layer thumbnail (in Photoshop) and going into Adobe Camera Raw for the next adjustment to that layer. This is in contrast to the other two aforementioned methods. This approach allows for literally an infinite amount of layers/adjusting (as many Raw Layers as a computer can handle anyway) with the adjustments done in the lossless highest bit depth computation space of Camera Raw (not on rasterized data) with ZERO degrading of the image. No build up of artifacts and so forth. When a Raw file becomes rasterized (flattened) the many Raw Adjustments that were done to it in Lightroom/Camera Raw do not equal many separate lossy rasterized pixel adjustments.

The same is not true for the other two approaches.

We have had Raw Layers (Raw Layer on a Raw Layer in a Layer Stack) ever since Smart Objects came out in Photoshop quite some time back. Originally they did not work that great (an exclusively Raw on Raw workflow) years back (if you had too many layers - even 5 or so depending on the computer - you would get all sorts of weird hiccups and issues) but for at least a few years now, they work AWESOME!

A person can literally duplicate the Raw Smart Object Layer by Right Clicking on the Raw Smart Object image Thumbnail in the Layers pallet/window in Photoshop and choose "New Smart Object Via a Copy". Otherwise other typical duplication methods in Photoshop will have them inextricably linked (you adjust one, the other adjusts as well). You can use tons of individual RAW Layers (used much like adjustment layers or smart object layers). The Raw Data can also be saved as various wrappings/containers (file formats).

A person can also Right Click on one of the various Raw Smart Object layers in a stack (the Layer thumbnail in the Layers pallet) and choose "Replace Contents" if they want to bring in different Raw Layers into the stack (Raw Layer skies, or other Raw bracketed files to blend for dynamic range, and so forth...). For uber quality minded photographers, this method of working "Raw on Raw" as some call it, has awesome, noticeable real world benefits. Most notably for images with tons of adjustments applied (people who adjust and micro adjust their images a lot) that end up becoming big high resolution enlargements.

Noteworthy (but not without controversy) there are also additional real world, testable noticeable benefits choosing Photoshops 32-bit working space while processing this way (at least as far as a person can take the image) although it is not absolutely necessary, and is admittedly a little quirky and takes a bit of a learning to get the most out of it. Also, lessening or minimizing selection based masks (using other forms of masking) is a plus as well.

The bottom line is (for some people) pushing the lossless editing (vs lossy editing) as far as possible using the highest bit depth/computation space and practices

I have literally replicated workflows step by step (on images with noticeable damage on an enlargement print like artifacting, banding or posterization/degrading...) but using this method, and the damage does not exist.

I teach it, have tutorials on it, and have been rigorously testing (others have as well) it daily for many years, and the benefits are noticeable, more notably in enlargements (my full time living - when not leading workshops - processing for print for high end, fine art, nature photography galleries or exhibitions nationally and internationally (under very strict confidentiality agreement). This affords me the unusual ability/luxury, and necessity to work on and obsessively test files, and stretch their abilities too often, 16 hours a day, 6 days a week, year after year after year. Some of which is taught in Robert Park and my "The Ultimate Mastering Fine Art Printmaking Workshop" every March, in Vegas.



Feb 07, 2022 at 07:52 PM
J. Pow
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Fantastic Images! Absolutely love the second!

Joel



Feb 07, 2022 at 08:34 PM
Starfire8
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Hi, Mark! My favorite image of this series is the 3rd image! :-)) So happy for you and beautiful Sabrina! Actually, the first image literally took my breath away when I first saw it! The soft colored sky and the exquisite wave detail blew me away! You are an exceptional artist, without a doubt! Thank you also for the continuing education on post processing. Having what you taught me in the print workshop reinforced is always of great help! Have a great day in your natural studio!!!
David



Feb 08, 2022 at 12:49 PM
Ross Martin
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Mark, that first image is so lovely, and great to see the pic with your wife!


Feb 08, 2022 at 01:08 PM
agvogel
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


Amazing image Mark, truly looks like brush strokes and I love the glint of orange light on the wave on the left side.

Out of curiosity, why shoot at f32 as opposed to using an ND filter?



Feb 11, 2022 at 12:59 AM
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Atlantic Dreamscape 2022


agvogel wrote:
Amazing image Mark, truly looks like brush strokes and I love the glint of orange light on the wave on the left side.

Out of curiosity, why shoot at f32 as opposed to using an ND filter?


Well, thank you very much for the compliment!

That is a great question, and one that is a little tough to fully answer.

Here is some of it:

I live on the beach (currently) and will sometimes shoot waves for hours, every day when conditions are interesting to me. I usually shoot about 1000-2000 images in a shoot, then evaluate, rate and sort them all (I also keep them all).

Because of the nature of the subject matter (moving water with a little intentional camera movement) combined with the fact that I work on photos all day long 6 days a week when not doing my workshops or educational materials, and also have a very strong post-processing edge (I am able to test rigorously everything related to sharpness and noise reduction, nearly every day all year round). This also allows me to get out of files what very few could. You can see a little of this on my Youtube channel.
In fact I had to completely invent from scratch (not just some new software) a few extremely unique proprietary techniques (industry game changers) to be able to get these types of images to be able to be 10 foot, 90", 80", 72", 60", 50", 45" 36" top class prints. NO software (including AI based) could do it.

So, that is to say that the images are mainly soft already (mainly blurred from in-camera intentional panning movement) and I have invented techniques to get insane detail out of them.

Another thing is that I most often like a full depth of field. Zooming into 70-400mm (more of less) really kills the DOF. So I actually do not worry about f/stop setting (unless its too wide open!) hardly at all with a lot (but not all) of this work.

The wave processing techniques specifically for printing, I only teach at Robert Park (Nevada Art Printers) and my "The Ultimate Mastering Fine Art Printmaking Workshop" with a NDA signed, or my "Florida Dreamscape" (also NDA) Workshops.

Very interestingly to me, I think it was last year, but I had some very popular/successful photographer (I think he may have been a Nat Geo shooter among other things email me and say:

"What are you doing to get your panned waves so clean and sharp?! I have been trying hard to accomplish what you are doing for over 10 years now. Is it your camera gear? Is it something you are doing in processing? or something else?"

I had to be honest and tell him that actually, it was A LOT of things, and that I teach it especially on my Florida Workshops. It's too comprehensive to explain in a paragraph or two...


I know that is a long explanation, but I hope it helps.

I hope you get out there and get great work!

If you have further question, please feel free to email me!

Mark






Feb 12, 2022 at 05:44 PM





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