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Archive 2018 · Deep Sierras

  
 
greeneggs
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p.3 #1 · p.3 #1 · Deep Sierras


By my map, the Temple Crag shot is 4.4 miles from the trailhead.


Jul 23, 2018 at 10:11 AM
Gregg B.
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p.3 #2 · p.3 #2 · Deep Sierras



greeneggs wrote:
By my map, the Temple Crag shot is 4.4 miles from the trailhead.


There are lots of lakes there and the one in the shot was 6.7 or 7 miles away. If you know the location just go and see how long it will take you to get to that place. And check the distance on your iPhone (it has app for tracking your steps, elevation and distance etc).


Edited on Jul 23, 2018 at 06:12 PM · View previous versions



Jul 23, 2018 at 12:57 PM
greeneggs
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p.3 #3 · p.3 #3 · Deep Sierras


Sorry, I shouldn't have tried to argue.


Jul 23, 2018 at 01:34 PM
lighthound
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p.3 #4 · p.3 #4 · Deep Sierras


Absolutely stunning images Gregg.
I envy you for having such a treasure trove of gorgeous places like this somewhat near you.

Did you do any nightscapes while you were back in there?

Dave



Jul 23, 2018 at 02:59 PM
01Ryan10
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p.3 #5 · p.3 #5 · Deep Sierras


in the meantime and unrelated to this post, i'm trying to get a camping spot at the OP trailhead for this weekend and getting stonewalled. LoL...pushing F5 on 4 different camping spots for this weekend in hopes someone cancels.


Jul 23, 2018 at 03:13 PM
Littlefield
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p.3 #6 · p.3 #6 · Deep Sierras


01Ryan10 wrote:
The ole don't ask don't tell policy.

I'm still intrigued every time i see a Whitney picture. The peak is quite flat on top even though it looks like a jagged spike from the valley or AHs area.

Epic work as always.


All you have to do is go to his Instagram site.
Don



Jul 23, 2018 at 03:32 PM
01Ryan10
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p.3 #7 · p.3 #7 · Deep Sierras


nah...i already knew the location the moment i first saw it posted here. It is still a glorious location no matter how many people go each year.


Jul 23, 2018 at 03:43 PM
Gregg B.
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p.3 #8 · p.3 #8 · Deep Sierras


lighthound wrote:
Absolutely stunning images Gregg.
I envy you for having such a treasure trove of gorgeous places like this somewhat near you.

Did you do any nightscapes while you were back in there?

Dave


Hey Dave. Yes I did. July is the best time for Milky Way as it is nicely visible (the best part of it with clouds etc.).
Here is one soon after the sunset time, hence some red colors in the clouds. I shot this at ISO 10,000 for 15 seconds.






Edited on Jul 23, 2018 at 06:38 PM · View previous versions



Jul 23, 2018 at 06:16 PM
Gregg B.
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p.3 #9 · p.3 #9 · Deep Sierras


greeneggs wrote:
Sorry, I shouldn't have tried to argue.


It's OK Greeneggs
I know it's longer than 4.4 mile because it took me over 5 hours to get to that lake. I moved to another the next day, which was about a half a mile further. I ended up at 10200 feet elevation. I saw different lakes and rivers along the way just as pretty, if not prettier than the one on the pic. The place is simply stunning. I passed a few forests (including aspen trees forest, so no need to fly to Colorado), and amazing rock formation mostly from granite (white granite at that).
I'd stay a week there a shoot away and wouldn't scratch the surface of beautify this place has to offer. All Sierra Nevada is like that... and I want to explore more places as long as they stay below the tree line. That's my thing. I want some trees in the composition as oppose to just rock and some water....

Edited on Jul 23, 2018 at 06:25 PM · View previous versions



Jul 23, 2018 at 06:23 PM
Gregg B.
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p.3 #10 · p.3 #10 · Deep Sierras


Littlefield wrote:
All you have to do is go to his Instagram site.
Don


Fair enough. Hey while there follow me, he?



Jul 23, 2018 at 06:24 PM
Dave Dillemuth
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p.3 #11 · p.3 #11 · Deep Sierras


Congrats, Gregg. And yes, not "advertising" these locations is the right decision, IMO. I base this on 25 years of hiking into this range and watching the changes in visitation. Those that really have a passion to find them can do so with a little effort.


Jul 27, 2018 at 08:45 PM
Arka
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p.3 #12 · p.3 #12 · Deep Sierras


Each of these is sublime. What time of year were they shot?


Jul 28, 2018 at 11:44 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.3 #13 · p.3 #13 · Deep Sierras


Gregg B. wrote:
I'I know I've only scratched the surface since I've done so far only three major hikes to several lakes but I've planned at least 20 more already to hike up and see what this huge 130 miles long range has to offer.
These five shots came from various spots. Some of you can easily recognize them and if you do please don't spell out the place's name here. I don't want these locations to get flooded with pseudo-hikers/photographers and "trashed" like Patagonia.


Gregg,

Lovely work from "my" Sierra Nevada.

As a photographer who has been hiking (climbing, camping, backpacking, x-c and tele skiing, and more) in the range since, well, decades ago...

... I'm grateful for your reminder about the fragility of the place and the importance of allowing people to discover places via their own sweat... and for speaking up about not naming every darned place where we make a photograph.

Aside from completely obvious locations (Half Dome, anyone?) I stopped including location information on photographs, especially when posted on the internet, perhaps almost a decade ago. Several factors pushed me in this direction, the first two of which were crystalized by conversations with other photographers who have worked this subject for years and with a friend who was a long-time Yosemite ranger.

1. As you point out, many locations in the Sierra (and other popular places) are feeling the pressure of too many people and, even more so perhaps, too many people in a few supposedly extra-special places. It turns out that both individually and collectively we, as photographers, need to exercise some restraint on behalf of these beautiful and fragile places. (It isn't that we are "trying to keep them to ourselves" — everyone is free to discover them as we did — but we don't want to be complicit in the destruction of what makes them special.)

2. Great photographs speak as photographs, and their power to do so is rarely dependent on naming the thing in the photograph. A photograph of, say, Mount Whitney isn't so much about the physical fact of that mountain as it is about the light, the atmosphere, color, texture, and, when you come right down to it, the experience of all mountains. (I distinctly recall the last pack trip of mine that included the Whitney summit. I decided to not go there again. There are too many other equally or even more beautiful peaks in this range.)

3. Speaking of that last point, beauty is to be found everywhere throughout the Sierra, and those who explore will find it. Trust me when I say that it is a much greater joy by far to spend time wandering and looking and waiting for light in your own places than to make yet another photograph of a place we've all seen.

Again, thanks.

Dan




Jul 28, 2018 at 12:35 PM
Gregg B.
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p.3 #14 · p.3 #14 · Deep Sierras


Arka wrote:
Each of these is sublime. What time of year were they shot?


Last month.



Jul 28, 2018 at 01:15 PM
jdc562
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p.3 #15 · p.3 #15 · Deep Sierras


Thanks for sharing your beautiful images. And more thanks for not giving the locations. The delicate meadows shown in your photos would be quickly destroyed by thoughtless hikers if the locations became hiking targets.

For those of us who photograph beautiful locations, President Trump's recent Executive Order removing protections for a number of National Monuments puts us in a quandary. If we post photos showing the beauty of fragile areas at these locations, we risk increasing the destructive effects of too much visitation. However, if we don't post these images, the public will not be aware of the natural beauty that will be lost because of mining, oil drilling, logging, and other destructive activities.

Even the Sierra Club obliviously promotes such destruction. The front cover of the April-June 2018 Sierra Club's "SoCal Now" magazine shows two people lolling on top of a bed of wildflowers, selfishly dismissing the reality that the crushed flowers won't produce seeds for subsequent blooms. (Sierra Club "SoCal Now," April-June 2018, Volume 3, No.2. Sierra Club Angeles Chapter. The photo is titled, "Front Cover: Visitors enjoy spring flower bloom last year at Carrizo Plain National Monument in San Luis Obispo County. Credit: Mary Forgione.") https://angeles.sierraclub.org/sites/angeles.sierraclub.org/files/SCN%202018Q2%20final%20web.pdf



Jul 28, 2018 at 01:54 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.3 #16 · p.3 #16 · Deep Sierras


jdc562 wrote:
For those of us who photograph beautiful locations, President Trump's recent Executive Order removing protections for a number of National Monuments puts us in a quandary. If we post photos showing the beauty of fragile areas at these locations, we risk increasing the destructive effects of too much visitation. However, if we don't post these images, the public will not be aware of the natural beauty that will be lost because of mining, oil drilling, logging, and other destructive activities.


One option when using photographs to help protect wilderness and other natural lands is to calibrate the specificity of the description. For example, in some very large and diverse areas I may name the wilderness area, park, or monument (Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, for example) without identifying the specific location within that large place.

It would be interesting to have a discussion — but not in Gregg's photo thread! — on this important subject: how photographers can use their work in ways that promote the protection of our landscape for future generations.

(Again, not here. But if anyone is interested and can think of the appropriate forum for that discussion, I'll join in.)

Dan

Edited on Jul 29, 2018 at 12:02 PM · View previous versions



Jul 28, 2018 at 05:54 PM
Rajan Parrikar
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p.3 #17 · p.3 #17 · Deep Sierras


gdanmitchell wrote:
... I'm grateful for your reminder about the fragility of the place and the importance of allowing people to discover places via their own sweat... and for speaking up about not naming every darned place where we make a photograph.

Aside from completely obvious locations (Half Dome, anyone?) I stopped including location information on photographs, especially when posted on the internet, perhaps almost a decade ago. Several factors pushed me in this direction, the first two of which were crystalized by conversations with other photographers who have worked this subject for years and with a friend who was a long-time Yosemite
...Show more

This is vacuous, hollow posturing. The ONLY principled position on this for a photographer who desires to keep place X under wraps (and thereby hope to restrict visitation) is to not publish any photographs of place X in the first place. To publish photos and then preen about not giving out specific locations is a phony tactic practiced by pretend keyboard wielding eco warriors who imagine themselves as exclusive custodians of privileged inside information.

Presumably the places being talked about here are relatively remote so it is not like they will attract casual drive-by 'bucket list' visitors. It is mostly the motivated person who will be interested in such spots, and in this era of Google Earth and other digital mapping resources at one's fingertips, it is not hard to figure out locations with just a few hints. Furthermore, there are always regional experts on hire and for a price they will lead you to these places. In other words, you can do bupkis to prevent someone from knowing where you have been once you have published your photo.

At any rate, what used to be once considered remote areas are today far less remote and the final frontiers of remoteness will be tamed in the years to come.

Just in case there are 10 year olds reading this: nobody is questioning your right to not give out specific locations.



Jul 28, 2018 at 06:33 PM
jdc562
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p.3 #18 · p.3 #18 · Deep Sierras





Edited on Jul 29, 2018 at 12:12 PM · View previous versions



Jul 29, 2018 at 11:54 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.3 #19 · p.3 #19 · Deep Sierras


Thanks, Mom!

You seem easily... triggered. You also apparently don't read or understand posts before spilling your bile. Your unfocused and misdirected anger suggests issues that go beyond those appropriate for discussion in this forum, Rajan, though this astonishing post of yours nicely illustrates why I avoid any interaction with you here. (Yet, you persist...)

Back to the subject. Impressive photographs, Gregg.

Dan

Rajan Parrikar wrote:
This is vacuous, hollow posturing. The ONLY principled position on this for a photographer who desires to keep place X under wraps (and thereby hope to restrict visitation) is to not publish any photographs of place X in the first place. To publish photos and then preen about not giving out specific locations is a phony tactic practiced by pretend keyboard wielding eco warriors who imagine themselves as exclusive custodians of privileged inside information.

Presumably the places being talked about here are relatively remote so it is not like they will attract casual drive-by 'bucket list' visitors. It is mostly
...Show more


Edited on Jul 29, 2018 at 12:14 PM · View previous versions



Jul 29, 2018 at 12:02 PM
jdc562
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p.3 #20 · p.3 #20 · Deep Sierras


Dan --- I would be glad to participate in such a forum. I am strictly non-commercial, but donate my photos to educational and conservationist activities.

Sadly, photos taken just a few years ago are now "before" shots where environmental destruction is rampant. Although I'm a biologist, there are plenty of non-scientists who can contribute to these activities. It's all in the images themselves, not who takes them. I say this because photographers who could contribute excellent images are shy about doing so because they are not part of the science establishment. Their reluctance is reinforced by some conservationist photography groups that are run as elitist, exclusionist, cliques. Our forum would need to be above that.



Jul 29, 2018 at 12:09 PM
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