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Canon EF 28mm f/2.8

ef28mmf_28_1_
Review Date: Mar 19, 2008 Recommend? | Price paid: $150.00

 
Pros: Very sharp across the frame. Normal lens for APS-C. Lightweight & cheap.
Cons:
f/2.8 instead of f/1.8. No FTM

With a 50.7 degree AOV on a EOS 400D DSLR, this is a normal lens. The lens dates back to the original EF lineup from 1987 and shares features with lenses from that era as an arc-form drive focus motor and a thin focus ring. While the build quality is not stellar, it is good enough that it won't be a worry for normal users. As far as the image quality of the lens goes, it is excellent for the price and weight, especially on APS-C (eg. 400D) sensors where the borders of the image plane are unused. Users that complain about soft borders between f/2.8 and f/5.6 seem to mostly be 135-format users. The lens is contrasty and resists veiling pretty well. What makes this lens especially attractive is the low price. At $159.95 (at Adorama or B&H) there is no reason to avoid this lens unless one already has the EF 28mm f/1.8 USM (which is comprable in sharpness across the f-stop range). This also brings up the main drawback of this lens - it opens to a maximum of f/2.8. This is not a huge drawback since it is better than what most zooms can do anyway. On my 400D, setting the ISO to 800 lets me shoot with this lens in poor light and still end up with useable exposures. There is no FTM on this lens, but really these two drawbacks are knitpicking. This is a fine lens.

 
Canon EF 28mm f/2.8

ef28mmf_28_1_
Review Date: Mar 19, 2008 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Very sharp and contrasty. Normal lens for APS-C EOS DSLRs. Lightweight and compact. Cheap.
Cons:
f/2.8 instead of f/1.8. No FTM.

With a 50.7 degree AOV on a EOS 400D DSLR, this is a normal lens. The lens dates back to the original EF lineup from 1987 and shares features with lenses from that era as an arc-form drive focus motor and a thin focus ring. While the build quality is not stellar, it is good enough that it won't be a worry for normal users. As far as the image quality of the lens goes, it is excellent for the price and weight, especially on APS-C (eg. 400D) sensors where the borders of the image plane are unused. Users that complain about soft borders between f/2.8 and f/5.6 seem to mostly be 135-format users. The lens is contrasty and resists veiling pretty well. What makes this lens especially attractive is the low price. At $159.95 (at Adorama or B&H) there is no reason to avoid this lens unless one already has the EF 28mm f/1.8 USM (which is comprable in sharpness across the f-stop range). This also brings up the main drawback of this lens - it opens to a maximum of f/2.8. This is not a huge drawback since it is better than what most zooms can do anyway. On my 400D, setting the ISO to 800 lets me shoot with this lens in poor light and still end up with useable exposures. There is no FTM on this lens, but really these two drawbacks are knitpicking. This is a fine lens.