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Sigma 28mm f1.8 EX DG Aspherical Macro

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Reviews Views Date of last review
26 183387 Jun 17, 2014
Recommended By Average Price
77% of reviewers $248.50
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
8.24
8.80
7.8
28_f1_8_1_

Specifications:
SIGMA 28mm f1.8 EX DG Aspherical Macro is one of several EX-Series lenses to be introduced at Photokina 2000 by Sigma Corporation of Japan (2-13-15 Iwado-Mi-nami, Komae-Shi, Tokyo). This lens has a fast F1.8 maximum aperture, with macro-focusing capability. It features minimum focusing, down to 20cm/7.9inches (reproduction ratio 1:2.9). The iris diaphragm has 9 diaphragm blades to obtain beautiful out of focus image. It incorporates the floating focus system and the use of two aspherical lens elements to minimize distortion, spherical aberration and astigmatism. The lens incorporates minimum vignetting optical construction in order to obtain adequate peripheral brightness with open aperture. Internal focus system of the lens eliminates front lens rotation, thus allowing the use of a Perfect Hood and easy use of polarizing filters. The lens also incorporates a dual-focus mechanism. It is easy to hold the lens, since focusing ring does not rotate during auto-focus, and yet provides adequate torque of the focusing ring during manual focusing of the lens. The lens materials used in this new lens are lead and arsenic free ecological glass.


 


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gowron300d
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Registered: Dec 7, 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 0
Review Date: Dec 7, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 9 

Pros: sharp, sharp, sharp Fast 1.8. Macro distance of about 0.04 meter. Comes with hood and carrying belt pouch. A bit heavy (pro or con as you want it!)
Cons:
Bulky, Auto focusing sometimes off. A bit heavy (pro or con as you want it!)

Had it for few weeks now and it is very sharp at any opening.
Fast at 1.8. Great value for the price. Of course comes with hood and carrying belt pouch.
A bit heavy (pro or con as you want it!)
Sigma claims that the macro focusing distance of 0.20 meter, forget it, you can click an object as close as about 4cm close with surprisingly good results.
A nice addition to a collection.

A bit bulky, but understandable for a 1.8 lens, focusing is a bit slow not beeing a USM, seems to have an issue to get the correct focus sometimes. Using manual focusing gives A1 results.
A bit heavy (pro or con as you want it!)
Auto/manual focus is a 2 step job, but you get used to it quickly.


Dec 7, 2005
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tsangc
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Registered: Nov 22, 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 242
Review Date: Nov 27, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 8 

Pros: Fast and wide, inexpensive
Cons:
Heavy

Most Canon EOS shooters buy a 50mm f1.8 prime because it's cheap, fast and sharp. I had a chance to use one on two occassions, but I found that I had difficulty composing with it as I have a crop APS body such that the 50mm length is more like 80mm. This is great for portraits in a studio but terrible for event photography.

The Sigma 28mm is a great alternative: The 28mm length is easier to handle and compose with and the maximum aperture of f1.8 is great for indoors shots without flash. The lens features a large front element diameter which really lets light in and makes the lens quite bright.

Shooting at f1.8 on any lens is tough because the depth of field is so shallow. However, if you need the range in low light, it's useful. Also, the lens can be very sharp with enough light.

The focusing mechanism disengages the clutch when the focus ring is pulled forward, which allows you to keep your fingers on the ring while the lens is in AF. When you toggle the lens to manual, you can pull the ring backwards, which engages the clutch and lets you focus manually. Note this lens uses a traditional servo motor, so it does not have FTM like the Canon USM lenses.

The lens is also really nice for macro photography.

Sigma includes a "perfect" lens hood and a nylon padded carry bag, which are nice touches. The lens has a nice matte finish and the focus ring is easy to grasp.

There are a few downfalls, however. The large 77mm diameter is great, but it also means expensive filters. The Sigma 28mm is also quite heavy in comparison to the Canon EF 28mm.

The motor is louder than most and it is not that quick in focusing. However, for the price, it's just fine. Highly recommended for those who want a fast, wide lens for a reasonable price compared to the Canon EF 28mm.


Nov 27, 2005
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eneref
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Registered: Feb 26, 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 178
Review Date: Jul 15, 2005 Recommend? no | Price paid: $289.00 | Rating: 6 

Pros: Sharp (when in focus) wide open, nice construction, good colour, macro focus.
Cons:
Focus issues, a bit heavy for a 28, 77mm filters

I fell in love with this lens and its brethren, the 24mm F/1.8 EX DG Macro, and the 20mm F/1.8 EX DG Macro because of their reputed sharpness, my overall love of my other Sigma lenses, and the handy, macro focus capability of these lenses (allowing for some fun, wide(r)-angle, low-light shots).

I ended up buying four of them... one after the other. Not a single one would auto-focus correctly on my Canon Digital Rebel, my Canon 20D, a 10D I borrowed, or another 20D I borrowed. Eventually, I simply gave up and tried one of the 24mm ones, and then one of the 20mm ones -- all with the exact same design and only differing in their lens elements. No luck. I sent them back to Sigma who told me that the lens was just fine on their cameras, but did indeed agree that, given the sample images I sent them, didn't work on my cameras. They claimed that this was an error with the cameras I tried, although I've never had another lens do this (and trust me, I own a LOT of lenses) -- either Canon OR Sigma.

Reading similar problems online, I suspect this is an overall design flaw more than simply a quality control issue. Some of them work like a charm, but I'm wondering if they are the exceptions and not the rule.

Manually-focused, this lens works perfectly, and the images it created were indeed sharp and wonderful. If only they'd fix the auto-focus portion of it, this lens would get a 10 from me.


Jul 15, 2005
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ristan
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Registered: May 16, 2005
Location: N/A
Posts: 0
Review Date: May 16, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 8 

Pros: Kind of cheap. Nice big aperture.
Cons:
A little noisy and big, and mediocr construction/design.

I got this lense a year or two ago and I've finally decided that I'm kind of unhapy with it. Looking back I might have done better buying the Cannon 28 2.8. I don't like how bulky the lense is. I take my camera with me every where I go so this is a big deal. Also the barrel that holds the objective lense in the front is a little bit wobbly. Though it doesn't seem to effect the image too much I'm still turned off by this issue. Recently I borrowed a friends cannon 28-103 IS and used it at 28mm to compare. I noticed that it was much easier to line my shots up with this lense. I find that I am often taking many duplicate shots to slightly ajdust the angle of the camera because the shot never looks properly lined up. The most annoying part of this lense though is the auto focus. It's noticably loud, and when I'm trying to take kandid people shots it can really kill the mood. More annoying though is how poor it works! It seems to have trouble latching on in anything but ideal lighting conditions. I often don't bother using it, which sucks because I have a D30 which doesn't have a split focusing screen or anything.

The lense IS metal, which is great, and it has held up to my abuse pretty well. I have used the 1.8F many times in bars and things like that with good results. Keep in mind that I'm more of an artist than a photo gear freak so I'm not as insane about the sharpness of my pictures as many of the people on this message board. The lense is pretty sharp though, especially compared do my old cheapy sigma 28-85.


May 16, 2005
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fStopJojo
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Registered: Jun 4, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 327
Review Date: May 3, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $169.00 | Rating: 9 

Pros: f1.8 speed, solid EX build, very close focusing distance is a boon, reproduction ratio of 1:2.9, sharp wide open and very sharp at f2.2 and on, price/performance value.
Cons:
Some have reported front-focusing problems.

I got an unbelieveable price on eBay for this lens brand new, so I jumped on it; I'm glad I did. I'm using a Canon 20D, and it's a fantastic lens. See some of my test images of lenses at my site: www.pbase.com/fstopjojo/lenstests

May 3, 2005
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buffalob
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Registered: May 3, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 87
Review Date: Apr 29, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $230.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Great low light handling (f/1.8), very sharp across all aperatures.
Cons:
Not HSM, big (77mm) filter size

I bought this lens for my D70 so that I'd have a 50mm digital equivalent for low light. I've been pleasantly surprised at how sharp and well built this lens is for the price! Its definitely sharper than the 18-70 kit lens that comes with the D70. I use it primarily for indoor shots and the occasional landscape photo. I will definitely consider the Sigma brand in the future as an alternative to overpriced Nikon lenses.

Apr 29, 2005
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seyhun
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Registered: Feb 24, 2004
Location: Turkey
Posts: 11
Review Date: Sep 22, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $250.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Fits S2 Pro as a normal lens with 1.8 aparture
Cons:

My sample focuses well everytime including dark places.

Satisfactory performance from f: 2.8-11

Full open, good results. Contrast a little low. This is better than my Nikon 35/2 in some cases, especially when strong light spots are present.

I use it when even the best zooms with F:2.8 can't be used. (I have 18-35 and 28-70 Nikkors)


Sep 22, 2004
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evilenglishman
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Registered: Jun 21, 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 3
Review Date: Jun 21, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 8 

Pros: fast, good macro, solid build
Cons:
heavy, not good until f4, slow focus

I bought this after considering a few macro lenses. It was my first sigma and I've been quite happy with it.
The construction is very solid and it almost weighs the same as the Canon 28-135 IS USM.
Wide open i've found the lens to be fairly useless but taken down to f4 - f8 it starts to show why its a good cheap lens. Its very sharp and has a nice bokah - Flare and distortion are quite minimal.

The only other major drawback is the slow and loud focusing, it does get there but it would scare away and wildlife - not that being so close would of course Wink

Worth the money!


Jun 21, 2004
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David Haynes
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Registered: May 18, 2003
Location: United States
Posts: 536
Review Date: Oct 29, 2003 Recommend? no | Price paid: $245.00 | Rating: 4 

Pros: fast aperture of 1.8
Cons:
my lens was not sharp at 1.8 and had serious focusing issues on my 10D

I really liked the concept of an f/ 1.8 macro 28mm because I expected to be able to do compelling compositions wide open and play with spacial realtionships, etc., as well as using it as a slightly short "normal" lens on my 10D. But the lens I had would not focus accurately at 1.8 or even stopped down.

After carefully testing with the yardstick at a 45-degree angle method, I found that this lens consistently focused significantly ahead of the focus point selected. I had read in some forums that there was a problem with the computer chip on some Canon bodies and that Sigma would "re-chip" these lenses. So I sent it back to Sigma to see if they could make it work with my camera.

It was returned two weeks later with a curt note stating "cannot change software in the lens." The next day I put it on eBay.

Since, I've purchased the Canon 17-40 f/4L and I couldn't be happier with it.


Oct 29, 2003
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Jeffrey Behr
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Registered: Nov 22, 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 171
Review Date: Mar 30, 2003 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $204.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: CA performance, low price
Cons:

After receiving my 1Ds on 29 November, I briefly tested the 2 wide-angle lenses I owned, the Canon 28mm/1.8 and the 16-35/2.8, for chromatic aberation (CA). I was disappointed in the CA performance of the 28/1.8 and started looking for a replacement. I found that while there are not very many 28mm/1.8 Canon-AF lenses around, Sigma has 2. The earlier and less expensive is the Ď28mm f1.8 II Asphericalí. I found mine thru eBay for $130 delivered, from Sharper Photo. In testing, I found it never better than my Canon so I returned it. The Sigma Ď28mm f1.8 EX Aspherical DG Macroí is the later version and is quite a handful compared with its earlier brother or the Canon. It uses 77mm filters, fortunately a common Canon size. Yet itís quite affordable at only $204 from Delta. BTW, I use a prime 28 for panoramas, something thatís difficult to do with the 16-35, as its nodal point is about 3 inches (8 cm) forward of its mount.

I shot some Ďlandscapesí out my west-facing garage, into the bright Phoenix sky (but not into the sun). I included in the tests my 16-35 which is turning into a great lens on the 1Ds. I shot large fine JPGs (because I didnít feel like investing the time to convert these) and used MLU, selftimer, Velbon Carmagne 630 CF tripod, Kirk BH3, and a cable release.

I carefully compared center sharpness at f4, f8, and f16, and corner sharpness and CA at f8 and f16. Results were interesting. The 16-35 won overall, something that surprised me since itís a zoom. I guess those Canon lens designers are earning their pay lately! Of the 7 things scored, the Canon 28 was best in only one, corner sharpness at f8 (where it was worst in CA), while the 16-35 took 4 bests and the Sigma 3*.

Again, overall, the Canon 16-35 won, with a average score of 2.57 (of a possible 3), which probably is one reason it costs around $1400. Second was the Sigma with an average score of 2.29, while the Canon 28 was a distant third at 1.29. It was clearly the worst at CA, but the differences in sharpness among the three were much tougher to see.

Iíll be keeping the Sigma 28. Itís worthy of mounting on the 1Ds.


*ĖThat totals 8, not 7, because 2 tied for best in one criterion.


Mar 30, 2003
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Sigma 28mm f1.8 EX DG Aspherical Macro

Buy from B&H Photo
Reviews Views Date of last review
26 183387 Jun 17, 2014
Recommended By Average Price
77% of reviewers $248.50
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
8.24
8.80
7.8
28_f1_8_1_


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