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Canon EOS Rebel (300D)

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77 88416 Jul 10, 2012
Recommended By Average Price
92% of reviewers $907.67
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
7.43
8.65
8.8
300D-2

Specifications:
* Canon Digital SLR designed ground-up to be digital

* 6.3-megapixel CMOS sensor, 3,072 x 2,048 pixel images

* ISO of 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600

* Photo-centric design touch Shutter button in Play mode and camera returns to Record mode.

* Compatible with all Canon EOS system lenses and accessories, focal length multiplier of 1.6, plus the new EF-S digital-only lens.


 


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mikishots
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Registered: Jun 25, 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1
Review Date: Sep 24, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,199.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Lightweight, high resolution, menus easy and quick to use, excellent battery life.
Cons:
Fragile construction, the dreaded Error 99 (seen it three times), small buffer, no .TIFF option

Image resolution is excellent for the price.

An excellent introduction to digital photography, as it doesn't have every conceivable option in the world, but does offer a wide range of the basic ones you'll use on a regular basis.

Build quality is lacking, but the price is reflected in this. If you want something more robust, get the 10D or 20D, but if you want something to take great shots, this is the camera to use.


Sep 24, 2004
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phidong
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Registered: Feb 19, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 2503
Review Date: Sep 9, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,024.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: cheap =)
Cons:
small buffer =(

This is my first dSLR. It is GREAAAAT!! =)

Sep 9, 2004
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1982Petrus
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Registered: Aug 11, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1
Review Date: Aug 12, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $789.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Price, good product for the money, brings otherwise non-players into photography
Cons:
Loudish mirror slap, view finder is a tad small, hidden 10D features

A great product for the money.

I have always wanted to get into the hobby of photography but would not jump into film. This DSLR was low enough in price to get me started. I am shooting and happy about it.

If you're thinking about getting this camera, stop thinking and jump in - the water is fine.


Aug 12, 2004
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JLavino
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Registered: Jul 13, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 272
Review Date: Aug 12, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $750.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Lightwieght, Same capabilities as 10D, Good starter camera
Cons:
Nothing, considering the cost

I purchased this camera as my first DSLR and I love it. What makes this camera better is the firmware hack for it, it gives it the same features as the 10D. Only exception is the AISERVO mode is still funny out of sports mode. The 6.3 MP is great too.

Word of advice, always check for dead pixels.


Aug 12, 2004
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letjin
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Registered: Apr 19, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 150
Review Date: Aug 7, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $700.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: lightweight, picture quality, 18-55 lens
Cons:
lacks functions of higher-end, more expensive cameras (not really negative aspects...)

This is reallly good camera for the money. The camera is very light especially when it's paired with 18-55 lens. Whatever this camera provides, I find it adequate for its price.

300D and 10D gets compared a lot... and I admit that I don't like not being able to select AF & metering modes and that the camera have only 1 dial, but I could've have paid $4500 more and get 10d. After all, I paid $700 for the kit.

One of this camera's biggest advantage is that it comes with 18-55 lens. 18-55 gives decent images especially between f8-f11, even compared to 17-40, the lens performs quite well. Canon's other wide angle options usually go beyond $550, so 18-55 gives a very good cheap alternative on wide angle. (This lens only fits on 300D unless modified.)

Image this camera produce is identical to 10d. They have same CMOS sensor, and parameter 2 on 300D gives 10D colors.

Overall, very good camera for the money. If you are debating between 10D and 300D...get 10D if you care about black and heavier body, larger buffer, being able to select AF and metering modes, pay $500 more and get a 10d...otherwise, get 300D.


Aug 7, 2004
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jamesots
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Registered: Jul 12, 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 29
Review Date: Jul 22, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,200.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Amazing picture quality. Great user interace. Built like a tank. Super-long telephoto is cheap.
Cons:
Super-wide is expensive. Evil focus assist flash strobe.

I took several months to decide whether to get this camera or the Nikon D70, and until I got it I wasn't sure if I'd made the right decision. I now have it and I don't regret a thing. It's even better than I was hoping for.

The first thing I noticed when I picked it up is how solid it feels, especially compared to my previous film EOS 300. I then connected the battery pack/vertical grip, which makes the grip more comfortable even for horizontal photos. It makes it easier to hold the camera steady while long lenses are attached, and as an added bonus, it also makes the camera look cooler!

The buttons are all in exactly the right places for my hands, with everything you need while taking a photo accessible while holding the grip with your right hand and the lens with your left. The column of buttons down the left of the LCD are only used for reviewing images and setting up the camera.

Being able to change from 100 up to 1600 ISO on the fly is really nice, and even at 1600 the graininess of pictures actually looks quite nice (to me anyway).

Not having ever had FEC or mirror lock up on any of my previous SLRs, I don't miss it here. I've also never had really expensive lenses, so the kit lens seems fine to me. And my old 75-300 lens, which got really soft and dark at the edges on my film camera, is much better on the 300D because of the sensor being smaller and not picking up the edges. However, I am looking forward to getting the new Sigma 18-50 EX.

The only thing I don't really like about the camera is the way the flash pops up in the basic modes when it's dark, to help with focusing. I'm used to avoiding those modes anyway, from experience with the film EOS 300.

At the moment I'm shooting fine large JPEGs, as the quality looks good enough at that setting, and it's a lot more convenient that wrestling with RAW files. I then save as TIFF files while working on photos to stop losing quality through repeated lossy compression.

All in all, I think this is an amazing camera and would recommend it to anyone.

(The 700 I paid included the kit 18-55 lens, the battery pack, two extra batteries and a 1Gb memory card.)


Jul 22, 2004
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Review Date: Jul 16, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: light, same quality of image of the 10D,price
Cons:
no Mirror Lockup,no flash exposure compensation BUT none negative aspects....when you unlock all the hidden option

As I said this camera for the price is perfect when you unlock the hidden feature....when you do this the camera have all the feature set of the 10D except for the AI-SERVO.....
For the interested people to unlock all the feature set read this: http://www.hatch.org/blog/2004/06/03/canon_eos300d_firmware_hack.php

This camera is awesome for the price......if you want a digital SLR and paid at a good price.....this camera is a real good deal for the quality of the photo you will make with it.


Jul 16, 2004
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Location: United Kingdom
Review Date: Jul 13, 2004 Recommend? no | Price paid: $899.00 | Rating: 6 

Pros: Price and construction are very good, I've always liked Canon products
Cons:
I am consistently getting 2-4 stops underexposure with E-TTL flash control. Metering pattern should be easier to set, perhaps like the Pentax digital that has a switch that sets spot, center weighted or average. I noted some blooming around white subjects (like a shirt collar) on a hazy day.

I have lots of test photos I've sent to Canon Customer Service to prove the consistent underexposure of E-TTL. I solved the problem by not using a Canon flash and getting a Metz 54-MZ3, which is a superior flash to the 550EX anyway. It's a shame I had to throw away the E-TTL system but a PC Magazine review of this camera also mentioned underexposure. Canon could easily fix this problem with a firmware upgrade and completely resolve my complaints about this otherwise nice camera. Compared to the Nikon D70 that's getting rave reviews, it would be hard to recommend the Digital Rebel over the D70, however.

In fact, I'm considering ditching my entire investment in the Digital Rebel and lenses to switch to the D70 just so I can get consistent exposure. Yes, I understand how meters work (I have an AA degree in commercial photography) and when to use spot meters, average and incident metering. But the flash exposures that I would depend on in a commercial/wedding assignment were so bad that I tried to take the camera back to the store. It had been too long since my purchase to do that, so I bought the Metz flash that has its own sensor on the flash and it completely solved the flash problem. In fact, I could keep the EOS Rebel (I assume the 10D has the same E-TTL system) as long as I use a Metz or non-Canon flash. Is this the experience of other Canon flash users?


Jul 13, 2004
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nobody
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Registered: Jul 8, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 18
Review Date: Jul 12, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Price, weight, image quality vs digicams, 1.6x factor for animal shots
Cons:
Battery door, erratic battery life, no control of RAW+JPEG size, no control of metering modes, poor white balance in low light, small image buffer, exposure bracketing controls,

I've had mine for about 5 months and have shot just over 5000 frames with it. Having an all Linux workflow I shoot RAW and use dcraw, ImageMagick, cinepaint and the gimp for processing/printing. This combination produces very good images that can stand a lot of manipulation.

Physically, I very much like this body. I hike a lot and the relatively low weight is a boon. I have made the occasional use of the built in flash and been pretty happy with it (though obviously it's not as good as an external flash, I don't use one often enough to cough up the cash just now). My only complaint physically is that the battery door has a tendency to come open when I'm changing lenses or CF cards. This powers the camera down and I lose a few seconds realizing what happened and getting the camera powered up again.

Battery life is rather erratic. I tried to run down the battery once by setting it to smallest image size, putting in a 1G card and locking down the button on my remote. It shot 1500+ images without going dry. In more normal circumstances it can start running low in as little as 150- 200 shots. I've not had it run out on me, but this makes me nervous. I carry a spare battery just in case.

As for the controls and software, it seems like a design oversight that exposure bracketing settings aren't saved across a power cycle. Everything else is. It's quite annoying to be shooting bracketted, have it go into power save or need to change a flash card and then realize it's not bracketting as you fire off a 4 shot burst of identical images.

White balance is generally quite good, but it seems to get confused in very bright and very low light. It seems that it won't realize that relatively dim incandescent lighting is in use, so manual selection is a must. I haven't figured out how to avoid it overcorrecting for bright sunny days (removing blue tones that are supposed to be there) or removing the warm hues from a mild sunset (sky just slightly gold - the camera white balance made it blue). These problems have only rarely shown up, but when they do they're obnoxious since AWB normally does such a good job. Fortunately correcting for these things in the RAW input is quite doable.

My other complaints are basically limitations that Canon decided to put on this model to differentiate from the 10D. The image buffer is small when I'm shooting wildlife. I frequently find myself waiting for images to write to flash. I also wish for control of the JPEG included with RAW images, either to turn it off completely (for those times when I really want to save space) or save a full size JPEG (more often).

I recently loaded the hacked firmware and it gives me RAW+JPEG control. So far I haven't seen any downsides beyond no longer having a warranty.


Jul 12, 2004
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dacop
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Registered: Jun 23, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 592
Review Date: Jul 10, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $999.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: EXCELLENT image qaulity. Easy to use controls.
Cons:
None. Because if you want more options or a medal body, they are available on the 10D. So why complain about something that is available from Canon for more money?

Excellent Camera...period! Can't beat the price for a digital SLR with lens. If you are looking for more options, get the 10D, but the DigReb is all I need at this point. I will probably upgrade one day to the 10D, but with the results I am getting from this camera right now, I find no need to right now. One thing I noticed after using this camera and trying to use my Nikon 5700 afterwards...the 5700 (or any other conventional fixed lens digital camera) will not cut it anymore. They are toys compared to this camera.

Jul 10, 2004
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Review Date: Jun 21, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $999.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Prosumer digital member of the Canon EOS system
Cons:
No AF mode control

This is my third digital camera and my first SLR of any type. After using an Olympus C-2000Z (yeah, old model for years) exclusively in full manual mode for months, I was ready for an upgrade to a prosumer camera. If the Nikon D70 had been on the market, the choice between systems would have been tougher. At the time, the 300D was the only sensible choice.

I found it pretty easy to make the transition from LCD-compose point-and-shoot (no point to the viewfinder on the Olympus) to viewfinder-only SLR. This is obviously not an issue to people already accustomed to SLR's.

While I caught some very striking photographs with the Olympus, the proportion of good photos is much higher with the Canon. There are at least two reasons for this. The obvious reason is that the Canon has better glass and sensors. The completely non-obvious reason is the battery technology. The lithium-ion Canon rechargeables don't self-discharge, unlike the NiMH rechargables that I use in the Olympus. As a result, I can take the camera everywhere without having to worry about battery charge. And I do, so I catch many more good opportunities. Battery life is excellent, by the way. I shot a couple of gigabytes at the Monterey aquarium (no flash, minimal LCD review) on a single battery.

I knew perfectly well before I got the 300D that it was not a 10D priced $500 less. With one exception, I have not felt limited by what Canon removed from the 10D feature list. I really wish I had control over the AF mode and could use FTM focus on USM-equipped lenses (i.e., can't turn off AI Servo in the creative modes.) Yes, Canon almost certainly deliberately turned off capabilities that the 300D could provide. If it matters to you, buy the more expensive camera.

I don't understand why people complain about the plastic finish or the build quality of the camera. The body is quite solid. It's significantly lighter than the 10D, and frankly I think that's a positive. In comparison to the Olympus C-X000Z series, this is a much larger and heavier camera. While the decorative panels are not as rigid as cast metal (and I don't want to leave the impression they are flimsy in any way), the lens mount, grip and everything else that matters is solid. I've put a 70-200 f/4L on and had zero sense of wobbling or twisting when holding the combo solely by the camera grip. I don't plan to hammer nails with my camera. Do you?

The body's not weather sealed, but neither is the 10D, nor is weather sealing worth a price premium of $3000 to me. I have used the 300D in an Oregon mist/drizzle without fear. I sucked moisture into the 28-135 IS lens I was using, but the camera was unaffected and things dried out just fine. I've made a rain hood to keep liquid off the camera and lens body, but that's as far as I plan to go for moisture proofing.

A general drawback of almost all EOS cameras, by no means peculiar to the 300D or digitals generally, is that the viewfinder+screen just isn't intended for critical manual focusing. The AF works almost all the time, but I wish I had more control for certain things like macro work. The 10X magnification on the LCD review is useful for checking focus on static objects, but not bugs and other things that move around.

For general lugging around, I leave the 28-135mm IS f/3.5-5.6 lens mentioned earlier on the camera exclusively. The "kit" 18-55mm lens is certainly worth the $100 increment Canon charges over the bare body. However, I've found it unsatisfactory for a couple of reasons. The first time I used it full-wide for a shot I really wanted to keep (marina in Monterey bay), I found pretty serious chromatic aberrations at the edges of the photo. Enough to turn vertical white sailboat masts into red, white and blue bunting. (This problem becomes tolerable "purple fringe" at about 30 or 35mm.) Second, I need a wide lens more often for interiors than landscapes and the kit lens is either too slow or too soft. I'm about to try the 17-40mm f/4L instead. That will solve the first problem and limit the second one. (And I can buy two to four lenses for the price of the 16-35mm f/2.8L, so no point in suggesting I buy one, OK?)

By the way, the 1.6 cropping factor on this and similar cameras makes certain accessories useful that you normally might not think acceptable. I had 49mm filters previously, including a very nice 13cm Olympus diopter (comparable to a Canon 125D if Canon made any such thing) and a less extreme, high quality set of Hoya diopters. These diopters work without vignetting on the Canon lenses with 58mm filters which I have tried, including the 50mm f/1.4, the kit 18-55mm (through almost the entire range), and the 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6. Since I'm interested in macro work, this is a nice langiappe.

This camera doesn't come with digital media (Compact Flash, including Microdrives). That's probably the right choice from a price and flexibility perspective, but it means one more thing to buy before you can get started.

I do a lot of graphics arts work, and have no problem massaging digital photos. Unless I know a particular shot will be needed immediately and only as a JPEG, I take everything in RAW. I also take a lot of low-light photos. Noise at ISO 100-400 is pretty low, just as everyone says, when the illumination is good. At low light levels, noise goes up substantially, even in ISO 100. In fact, noise can be pretty bad for long-exposure shots where everything still ends up crammed into the low 15% of the histogram. Worse, the noise has a very noticeable "plaid" pattern of strong vertical and horizontal lines rather than purely random. No doubt this is because I am pushing the limits of the sensor and image capture system. The best processing I have found (so far) for salvaging these photos is to push exposure up 2 stops in the Canon file viewer utility, save RAW as 16-bit TIFF, convert to LAB, perform level corrections on the L channel, then do sledgehammer median filtering on the A and B channels before converting back to RGB. I can't suppress enough of the noise if I level correct in RGB, and the colors frequently go wacky to boot.

This camera will certainly keep me happy, and busy, for several years. And when I'm ready for a new body, most of the lenses and other accessories will carry over to whatever Canon will have on offer then.


Jun 21, 2004
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Benjamin Munn
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Registered: Jun 15, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1020
Review Date: Jun 19, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $999.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Ease of use, lens compatability, price, image quality
Cons:
look and feel of the camera body

This camera has served as a great introduction to the world of digital photography for me. I have enjoyed using it so much that I am now considering getting a Mark II. It has me taking pictures again and that is one of the most positive things that you can say about a camera. The ease of use has made photography fun for myself and even for my wife.

I have used this camera primarily for sports and portraits. Thus far it has performed very well. I have been able to pull many 8x10s and 11x14s from it. I am not sure how the quality will hold up after that but only because I haven't tried printing that large.

The convenience of being able to switch ISO settings on the fly has allowed me to capture so many more images that would have other wise been lost. Add to that the ability to view the pictures as soon as they have been taken and you have a camera that not only has saved me a lot of money on film and processing but has also given me the assurance that I got the shot.

I highly recommend this camera to folks looking to get into digital photography. Maybe not the best bet for those that just want to point and shoot but if you want some creative control and are looking to find out if DSLRs are right for you, this is a great place to start.

Here are some shots taken with the camera.

http://www.transformerscels.com/Francis.jpg

http://www.transformerscels.com/Francis1.jpg

http://www.transformerscels.com/netk3.jpg

http://www.transformerscels.com/netKaneHart.jpg


Jun 19, 2004
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Review Date: May 25, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $792.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Image quality, easy menus, batteries last long, price
Cons:
No AI Servo except in Sport mode (which is jpeg iamge format, not RAW), No spot metering, plastic body, Depth-of-Field preview button in hard spot. N aperture or shutter bracketting.

Great image quality with this camera. Only 1600 ISO gives bad noise. That can be corrected easily in Neat Image. Menues very easy to navigate and most buttons are in easy location to operate, except the Depth-of-Field preview button, especially if you have a big lens on the camera. I have taken over 5,000 images with this camera.
For sports, I tested it at a baseball game. It does lack the "pro" quality ability of capturing the action all the time. I snapped 4 conective pics of a pitcher throwing to batter and missing many times the ball still. I had to time when the pitcher would deliver the ball and also the batters. But, what did I expect.
Still, for the price and image quality alone, a great camera.


May 25, 2004
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Review Date: May 23, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $999.00 | Rating: 6 

Pros: Light weight, price, and comes with a lens.
Cons:
Not built for much use. Breaks down around 4000 pictures.

I got the Digital Rebal in Oct 2003. In May 2004, it broke while I was traveling in Page AZ with a photo workshop. Very huge bummer. I then found out from several people that they have found that the camera, with it's light body, isn't really hardy enough for vigerous use. I came home and am lucky enough to be able to trade up to the 10D. We will see how that goes.

May 23, 2004
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RoyGBiv
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Registered: May 9, 2004
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Posts: 4
Review Date: May 22, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $899.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Price, compatibility with EF lenses, 6MP, light,
Cons:
Flimsy plastic body

This camera has made me start taking more pictures, of nature, of my family, friends, garden... That should say enough. Convenience of digital with quality approaching SLR.

I had a little 2MP Nikon and found i was taking all my casual pictures with it and not my Canon EOS A2, but quality was poor and speed was awful (could never catch a nice smile). So I bought the Digital Rebel to leverage lenses, a Tamron 28-200 AF 3.8-5.6 and my Canon 50mm 2.5 compact macro.

I love this camera, it's easy to use, holds lots of high res pictures, and the 6MP really makes a difference when printing or enlarging images. Unlike the Nikon i had there is no lag so you can catch good moments.

Yes due to plastic body it feels pretty flimsy compared to an SLR and now it's going to get some good competition in it's price range, I see price is dropping.

Recent shot with 300D and the macro lens. I'm just amazed at the detail, I zoomed in on one of my pictures and saw a spider I didn't even see in real life.

http://www.thinair.com/Blog/archives/000010.html
http://www.thinair.com/Blog/archives/000016.html


May 22, 2004
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Review Date: May 3, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 8 

Pros: Price, price and price! Entry into the world of EF lenses in a DSLR body Excellent photos with the flexibility of an SLR
Cons:
Plasticy body -feels cheap! Too light -feels cheap! Focus on any lens at infinity in manual focus mode is way out!

For an entry into the world of Digital SLR's this camera is good. Ahead of the Nikon D70 it has a silky smooth 100ASA setting which has FAR less noise than the Nikon who's lowest ASA setting is 200ASA. But, the Nikon feels and looks much better. When it comes down to it though, it is the quality of output that matters.........

Metering isn't great as it is easily fooled into over or under exposing, but it is digital, you can see the problem straight away and correct for it!

I found that when setting any lens to manual focus and then to the infinity stop, it was a mile out of focus. A trip back to the dealer got a better body, but none of those in the shop was particularly good! Perhaps Canon just works on the basis that it doesn't have to focus properly at infinity on manual as you'd usually be using AF. Anyway,, it is way worse than my film SLR (Minolta 700si) which focuses properly both on AF and on MF. The Canon also makes my Minolt feel like a proper camera as it has so much more weight than the Canon....

Overall, I am pleased with my purchase, which was made out of frustration waiting for Minolta to come out with a digital SLR body. Now they have announced one, for the end of the year, but as far as I am concerned, it is too little, too late and they have lost me as a customer.


May 3, 2004
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Canon EOS Rebel (300D)

Buy from B&H Photo
Reviews Views Date of last review
77 88416 Jul 10, 2012
Recommended By Average Price
92% of reviewers $907.67
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
7.43
8.65
8.8
300D-2


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