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Canon EOS Rebel (300D)

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Reviews Views Date of last review
77 88071 Jul 10, 2012
Recommended By Average Price
92% of reviewers $907.67
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
7.43
8.65
8.8
300D-2

Specifications:
* Canon Digital SLR designed ground-up to be digital

* 6.3-megapixel CMOS sensor, 3,072 x 2,048 pixel images

* ISO of 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600

* Photo-centric design touch Shutter button in Play mode and camera returns to Record mode.

* Compatible with all Canon EOS system lenses and accessories, focal length multiplier of 1.6, plus the new EF-S digital-only lens.


 


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sleepwalker33
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Registered: Feb 2, 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 662
Review Date: Mar 15, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 9 

Pros: Currently the best deal in DSLRs I would recommend this camera to everyone.
Cons:
No Sync Cord, Slow Write Time, Small Buffer

I bought this camera two weeks ago upgrading from a canon d30. To be honest I felt like I moved sideways and didn't really upgrade that much, I lost the PC Sync cord, build quality, and buffer size. With that said, I get many more keepers with this camera because it actually has a functional AF system. The W hack makes this camera very useable and I have already gotten some very nice pictures. Its default image settings have tons of punch to them, and although this may not be what some desire it is what my clients often want very colorful punchy images. If this isn't appropriate simply change the parameter and back to the more subdued hues of the 10d. To me the jury is still out on the directional arrows, I honestly thought I would hate them and I realize I just need to get used to them.

The camera is very simple to use and perfect for novice and any more advanced user on a budget.

Let me make something very clear, even though I doubled my mega pixels from the d30 that is simply not that noticable besides less pictures on my cf card. Most clients I have just want 4 x 6 and 8 x 10 which the d30 handles just fine.

To me it is amazing to have iso 800 that is alright and in smaller enlargements iso 1600 is useable.

I would strongly encourage people not to purchase the new rebel and get one of these older rebels at around 500$ the added features of the new rebel would be nice but it would be much better to spend the money on good glass. Don't get caught up in the mega-pixel race purchase good glass. The kit lens is not acceptable wide open and is to slow anyways.

Despite my apparent complaints let me make something clear, this is the most bang for buck period. This camera is cheaper then most Point & Shoots (or piece of something) camera's out there and it's a canon dslr with 6 megapixels and low noise. Purchase this camera and don't look back there is nothing even close to this when you consider bang for buck.l


Mar 15, 2005
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bohonk445
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Registered: Oct 18, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Review Date: Mar 7, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $800.00 | Rating: 9 

Pros: Price/Value/Features, compatibility with EF lenses and tons of 3rd party lenses to choos from, number of accessories available for the camera. # of, ergonomics of controls much better than most cameras I've tried
Cons:
1.6x Crop factor, Plastic "shimmy" feel when mated to heavy f/2.8 or "L" lenses, no LCD cover

This is the first DSLR I have ever bought. I researched the camera, Nikons, and lenses extensively. In addition, I got a lot of "word of mouth" advice from friends. I love this camera and feel as though I have made an excellent purchase. The combination of features/price/lens offerings is what sold me. The Nikons are nice but in the long run I felt as though their controls were not as ergonomic. I bought this camera with the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 lens because I thought I would want a lens right away. In my opinion this was a mistake and I should have held out for a better lens from the get-go. In all honesty, you can't go wrong between the Nikon D70 or Digital Rebel. They both have tons of features and lens offerings. I still have a lot to learn about this camera and quite honestly I don't feel as though I've taken a picture with it yet that I would want others to see. That doesn't mean I don't like it, it just means I am learning first and posting second.

Mar 7, 2005
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SmellyTofu
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Registered: Aug 22, 2004
Location: Australia
Posts: 1486
Review Date: Feb 7, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,300.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: - Light - Easy to use - Low price - Great photos
Cons:
- Lack of a few manual features of the 10D though the hack helps it a lot

I had this camera for 4-5months and in that time, I've learnt a lot more than I ever did with my Sonys.

Forget the posers wih too much money who think silver is unprofessional. For me, I couldn't care less if it was in hot pink ... well, maybe exaggerating a bit but you know what I mean. It took great photos, great price for the quality and solid as. Not having a go at some people but those who thought it was flimsy ought to have their heads because I found no creaking or anything that would suggest that it was made of plastic apart from the looks.

I took this camera to HK and Japan as well as many functions and events in Sydney and interstate here and I couldn't think of anything easier to carry about.

For those who want to make a bit of a small splash rather than dip their feet wet into photography, this is for you. Save your $$ for good L lens and in combination with this, it makes a good low cost, value for money and professional camera which takes fantastic shots.

I subsequently sold my camera for a used 10D (which was another A$1k~US$750 (or 43%) more when I originally purchased my 300D) as I have outgrown the 300D and need more to learn. The gentleman who bought my camera now uses it side by side with his other 300D taking group photos for tourist at Mrs Macquarie's chair with the Opera house and Harbour Bridge for a living with the standard 18-55 lens. (of course he has a few BIG Metz flashes as well to go with it).

The only bad thing I can say about it is the need to use the wasia hack to get some functions working but for the price versus benefits, you can bet price come out on top without sacrificing benefits. Also the 4 shot buffer does get hit a lot but maybe that's my style of shooting (motorsport and portrait) and being a bit too anxious to get the shot and end up shooting more than I should but be less frisky with the shutter button and you'll be fine.

Price paid is in A$.


Feb 7, 2005
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fozzybear1969
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Registered: Oct 27, 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 309
Review Date: Jan 28, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,199.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Low price DSLR, CMOS sensor, great colour, 6.3 megapixels, Uses Canon EF lenes and L lenses, optional battery grip, depth of field preview button, on camera flash pops up higher.
Cons:
1.6 crop factor when using wide angle lenses, plastic body (I should not complain for the price paid), the camera turns off when you open the memory card door.

This is my first DSLR camera, I bought from the camera store and thought why not try it out to see if I like it. I have 14 days to return it and guess what...I never returned it. I love this camera. The only thing I would nit-pik about is the plastic built but should not complain for the price paid. I list the 1.6 crop factor as a negative only if you use a wide angle lens but I rarely ever use an extremely wide angle lens. If you open the memory card door the camera turns off, you just have to be sure handed not to do this while the images is recording to tha card. Overall this is great camera to start with if you are going to enter the world of digital photography. For the more serious pro go for the 20D, 1DmkII, 1Ds or 1Ds mkII (the rolls royce of DSLRs).

Jan 28, 2005
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Johnlza
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Registered: Sep 29, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 21
Review Date: Jan 19, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: Not Indicated | Rating: 10 

Pros: Ease of use, reliability, excellent image quality,price
Cons:
None so far

I am a rank amateur!

I shot film up until October of 2004. I had an unfortunate episode of 3 " lost " rolls of film due to a combo of factors , including operator error.

I had some experience with the toy hold and shoot digitals. I looked into the Canon series and was delighted to find the starter SLR D300. I like the ability to instantly review the shot and provide for a re take as necessary.

I have shot approximately 3000 frames since. I am impressed by the great built in features of this camera, Raw, ISO to 1600 , AV, TV.
I also like the ability to use all of canon's glass.

Highly recommended. One day I may upgrade, but this is a great body.



Jan 19, 2005
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DigiCanon
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Registered: Jan 13, 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 16
Review Date: Jan 13, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $999.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Great quality for the price.
Cons:
A little plasticky.

Call me strange, but I've owned two of these. I bought one and loved it. Good price to break into the digital SLR realm. I was also new to Canon two years ago and have loved them so much I've become somewhat of an evangelist for their products.

I sold my first Rebel to make the upgrade move to a 10D but delayed the purchase and got another Rebel. I was going to buy the 10D, but the 20D was announced and I decided to wait.

I bought the vertical battery grip and it became an integral part of the camera. The extended battery life and full control while shooting vertically made me a believer of these inexpensive add ons.

I have loved the Rebel so much that I am ready to make the upgrade to the 20D. I learned enough about digital photography that I am willing to pay more for something with a stronger build quality. The speed enhancements are extremely attractive as well.

I can't say much to discredit the 300D/Rebel/Kiss, as it's a great camera with excellent quality. I only shot it in RAW and am anxious to see how well the 20D performs.

This is the camera that really got me hooked on Canon. A good buy.


Jan 13, 2005
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shoot_pictures
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Registered: Jan 12, 2005
Location: Australia
Posts: 2
Review Date: Jan 12, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: EF Lens Compatible, Quality Of Photo, Ease Of Use, Battery Length Perfect for the SLR beginner
Cons:
-Wouldn't Use Heavy Lens On The Plastic Body, -Autofocus red dots are sometimes hard to see in viewfinder. -No protection on the display screen

Great camera especially for the beginner SLR user.

If you can afford to, go the model up to either the 10D or 20D.

The only downfall is the plastic body and the mirrorprism rather than the pentaprism found in the 10/ 20D models.

Great pictures,

Comparing to the D70 Nikon, the 300D doesn't compare aswell but being a Canon person I decided to loose out on some of the features.

No real loss.

Definately purchase the lens package rather than the body only.

Would recommend purchasing a speedlite. Annoying pop up flash.

CONCLUSION-
Overall this is the perfect camera if you are interested in getting into SLR photgraphy. Its ease of use combined with its manual functions lets you start off with little to no knowlege of SLR's into a true photographer. You will not be disapointed in your purchace of this camera however you will want to upgrade in the future.





Jan 12, 2005
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Persy
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Registered: Aug 30, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Review Date: Jan 9, 2005 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Cheap! Compatible w/ all EF lens
Cons:
When activating the Flash, it pops up way too fast. Feels like it may break some day.

I'm just getting in to photography, however I love this camera. I have taken about 700 photos with it since early November (just random shots, nothing studio) and I love everything about it. I like the grip and the silver color, and I have never held a higher end camera before, but I think the sturdiness is fine. I also read somewhere that it needs weather proofing, but I used mine out in the snow the other day (very carefully) and when I got back in it seemed fine and has worked just the same since then.

So in conclusion, its a great starter camera (if you're a newbie like me) and I think if you've never used a high end camera before, this one will feel just perfect.


Jan 9, 2005
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WorldBuilder
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Registered: Sep 25, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 8181
Review Date: Dec 26, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $520.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Price/ Value | Ease of use | Weight/Feel (see construction "con" though)
Cons:
Somewhat cheap construction | Poor Flash | Ergonomically Mediocre

Do you want this camera? Depends on what you want.

If you are a true novice and just want to learn the art of digital photography, I cannot think of a better camera.

It's extremely inexpensive, fairly intuitive in it's features, and has loads of preset modes for newbies to learn with.

Despite all these things, it still has advanced features, too, lets you shoot RAW, and has good coverage of all the digital basics.

If you combine the Digital Rebel with the FM forums, you'll be shooting like a pro in no time!!!

Thumbs up,

Chris


Dec 26, 2004
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larrytucaz
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Registered: Oct 14, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 736
Review Date: Nov 26, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $565.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: VERY low price--bang/buck ratio off the charts, Top-grade image quality, Good control layout, WAY more responsive than any "all-in-one" camera--plenty for most uses, Good low-light AF, Long battery life, All the advantages befitting an SLR (full manual control, aperture-shutter priority etc, TTL view), wide-variety of Canon EF/EF-S mount lenses available
Cons:
Lot of features disabled (although "Wasia" fixes many of those, designated with "w"), uses "slow-sync" flash in Av (w), not as well-built as D70 or 10D etc, Servo AF not specifically selectable, start-up time and "burst" mode not as good as others (but plenty for most uses), no separate controls for aperture-shutter speed in manual mode, Camera can fire without CF card present (w), Can't specify size of JPEG in "RAW+JPEG" mode(w), No Flash Exposure Compensation(w), No Quick Way to Change Quality Setting(w), No Mirror Lockup(w), Awkward Manual Selection of AF Points Compared to D70

I got mine "late", November 8th 2004, but very low-priced; they're now going sometimes for $550 or so WITH the lens (used)! What a killer price! I had just paid $400 for a Nikon Coolpix 5400 as a 2nd camera--which I did like, it did very well--but then when I saw a Fred Miranda poster selling his entire DR kit for $565, I sold the 5400 (got all my money back) and made the upgrade. I have not regretted it.

Frankly, I wouldn't have considered the camera save for the "Wasia hack", which you probably know about; it's an alternative firmware available which re-enables many features that the Digital Rebel inherits from the 10D (since replaced by the 20D) which are disabled in the original firmware. More on that in a bit.

In particular, when trying out a DR at the store, I was disappointed to see that it uses "slow-sync" flash in Av mode with no way to stop it without the "Wasia hack." I ALWAYS shoot flash in Av mode, and "slow-sync" causes so much ambient light to be used you end up having to use a tripod (at least with the built-in flash, not sure how it would work with a 550EX etc). That infuriated me, but then I saw the "Wasia hack" fixes it, allowing me to lock the shutter at 1/200 second.

As an aside to this, I can't believe more reviewers don't make light of this--they never fail to mention the 3-second start-up time or inability to specify evaluative/matrix--center-weighted--spot metering (the DR uses evaluative/matrix in Av, Tv, P modes and "full-auto" modes, uses center-weighted in M---no way to stop that), but they NEVER mention the "slow-sync" issue.

The "Wasia hack" makes all the difference. With it, I can lock the shutter speed at 1/200 second in Av mode as I mentioned, I can also do mirror lockup (with delays of 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, 7.5 seconds), prevent the camera from shooting if no CF card is present, specify how large I want the JPEG in "RAW+JPEG" to be, and assign QUALITY to the set button so I don't have to enter the menus to toggle between JPEG or RAW mode.

The picture quality is great. The ability to have perfectably usable photos at ISO 400 or even perhaps 800 is HUGE. With any "all-in-one," even good ones like my Nikon Coolpix 5700, anything beyond 200 is useless; some are even useless at ISO 200! I typically shoot at the "base" ISO 100 with the DR as well as the CP5700, but at times the CP5700 was crippled by its uselessness at ISO 400 or 800. The DR is totally usable at ISO 400 or 800, some have said even ISO 1600 is good in a pinch.

Speed is good to me. It won't compare with the Nikon D70 or the new Canon 20D, but it's really quite good indeed. I very rarely have found its speed crippling--even in quicker-paced situations, like when this large flock of birds were flying over the sky and I put it in "burst" mode to grab a lot of shots. Even then, plenty of shots--certainly far more than any EVF model will give me.

The TTL view is great if you've been accustomed to an EVF camera like my CP5700. The ability to see through-the-lens with focusing auto or manual, and to be able to see at night-time without difficulties and to manually focus--that is HUGE. And its quick AF blows away any "all-in-one," and the DR's AF compares favorably to most any 35mm SLR's autofocus. If you've used a 35mm SLR and then tried to AF an "all-in-one," especially in difficult lighting, you know what I mean. You want your old 35mm SLR back in those situations. With the DR, you get the digital advantages COMBINED with the 35mm SLR advantages. It's great.

And shooting RAW? Much better. The CP5700 typically locks up for 20 seconds for each RAW shot. The DR? Even when NOT in "burst" mode, it only takes 4 seconds to get a RAW shot out of the way. MUCH better. (I use a SanDisk Ultra II 512 megabyte card.) I also happen to like Canon's "embedded JPEG," it's not as nice as a "true" RAW+JPEG like the D70 or new 20D where there is a separate JPEG file easily downloaded, but it's still much nicer than shooting RAW without a JPEG and having to "develop" a JPEG for each RAW. "Extracting" the embedded JPEG is MUCH faster--only about a second per photo, vs the 20 seconds per photo it takes for my CP5700 to "develop" each RAW (computer: Athlon XP 2200, 512 Meg DDR RAM).

And unlike the D70, at least if you have the "Wasia hack," the DR lets you specify the size of your JPEG in RAW+JPEG mode (its default is "medium-fine"; the D70 is fixed at a "Basic" JPEG). Some like to shrink the JPEG as small as possible to save space. Me, I like to make it "full-sized" (or, "large-fine") for optimum quality, so I can simply "extract" it without having to "develop" each RAW. It only takes 1 second approximately to "extract" a JPEG, while (with my CP5700's RAW mode anyway) it takes about 15-20 second to "develop" each RAW, very time-consuming.

The controls are well laid out. The exposure compensation, which I use pretty often, falls right in a natural place on the back where my thumb is, the thumbwheel near the shutter release is easily reached & used, and the location of the OFF/ON switch is MUCH better than those of the other Canons. They put their OFF/ON switch on the back, and it's one of those "thumbnail breaker" switches. What's up with that? The DR? A nice large thumb-operated OFF/ON switch on the top-right near the mode-dial. Totally logical!

The good location of the "burst" mode--a button on the top-right labeled as such--is also good, as is the white-balance and ISO controls. The "JUMP" button, which makes playback navigation quicker, is nice also. I actually don't use the menus much, especially since the "Wasia hack" allows me to use the SET button (combined with the thumbwheel) to change from "large-fine" JPEG to "RAW" very quickly. The lighted control panel is nice, too--and I have found I don't mind it being on the back vs the top-right either.

The control for manual section of your AF points, by contrast, is less impressive--but common in bargain-priced SLRs (especially 35mm SLRs). You press a button and turn a wheel to select your AF point. I used to own a Nikon N80 35mm SLR and it had a wonderful 4-way thumbpad for this, which was MUCH quicker and far more intuitive in high-speed situations. The Nikon D70 has this same superior control. (For the record, the new Canon EOS 20D has one much like it also.)

In situations where you may wish to change your AF point "on-the-fly" in the middle of a shoot, the DR's button-wheel approach won't be anywhere near as nice as the D70's 4-way. thumbpad. That said, I typically leave it on "full-auto" most of the time anyway, and it really does a good job.

If you use manual-mode a lot--I only use it for situations where I want to use "Bulb" timed-exposures--you will not care for the absence of separate controls for the aperture-shutter speed. The same thumbwheel works both--you spin it as-is for shutter speeds, hold down the exposure compensation button & spin-it for apertures. Not as logical. But I only use manual mode for those specific situations, so it's not a big deal for me.

As I think I mentioned, you lose the ability to specifically tell it what metering mode you want. It uses evaluative ("matrix") metering in Av, Tv P modes--and the "amateur" modes--and uses center-weighted in manual mode. It also switches to a "partial metering" (sort of like spot) metering if you use the exposure lock--and there's no way to stop any of that from occurring. But in my case, I prefer evaluative ("matrix") metering and I almost always use either Av or Tv mode anyway--or sometimes P--so that combination works fine for me. I rarely, if ever, use the "exposure lock" either so that also doesn't matter.

Also, of course, you can't specifically select "Servo" (continuous) autofocus, which sports shooters may not like. That said, I don't find it a problem, and you can "trick" it into shooting Servo if you choose a specific AF point, focus on your finger, and then immediately start moving your finger--then hold the shutter halfway down. For the duration of that one shot anyway, the DR will stay in "Servo" AF.

Overall? I love this camera. Its AF speed is great, having all the SLR advantages at such a low-price is a God-send, its control layout aside from manual AF-point selection is a total breeze, its image quality is great, its speed is actually plenty enough for most, and ESPECIALLY if you install the "Wasia hack" its feature set is actually pretty good.


Nov 26, 2004
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andrewma
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Registered: Nov 17, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 18
Review Date: Nov 25, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,000.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Cheap, decent range of ISO's, light weight. good range of features
Cons:
plasticky, lacks pc sync out port.

Beyond a great entry digital slr. While it won't be the mainstay for wedding photographers (lack of pc synch out can be a major drawback), it can be used in studio (with pocket wizard attached). even in wedding situations where you won't use strobes but have on camera flash, it's fine.

The turn on delay annoyed me a bit and resulted in lost shots (my 20D is instant and now i'm spoiled). Auto turn off feature had me sometimes pressing the shutter and waiting for the camera to turn on to fire...

i found the camera to be highly useful. The range of ISO's decent, although my A2 film based camera definitley seemed to have better pictures with 400 film and better light sensitivity than the rebel at 400 iso. with good lenses, i would say that it can be pro level. it won't be particularly useful for those that depend on sports shots for a living, buffer of 4 shots is a bit weak and i constantly found myself wishing for 3-4 more buffer spaced. the 20D solved that and the rebel is my backup now. but for soccer moms and dads, i feel the rebel will be more than enough. layout of the camera took a bit of getting used to but failry intuitive. I suggest getting the vertical grip, not only because it allows the camera to fire a LOT longer without changing batteries, but it just helps in vertical shots and holding the camera better when doing so.

great overall camera. wait for the dell online coupons, you can pick up this for $700 as of today!


Nov 25, 2004
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mjmetts
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Registered: Dec 3, 2003
Location: United States
Posts: 1516
Review Date: Oct 25, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $930.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Sure, there are features lacking but it is a great little camera that turns out stunning images. I expect to upgrade to the 20D sometime next year but I really live this camera. It's great for getting anyone involved in dslr photography.
Cons:
lack of features are made up for in price and image quality. I really wish that canon would have made it black though.



Oct 25, 2004
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misanthropic a
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Registered: Sep 26, 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 448
Review Date: Oct 21, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $630.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Price, performance VS. price, weight, easy of use for novice, features and the ability to unlock even more features. EF-S is nice too.
Cons:
None for the price, but...Body construction could be less plastic, weather-proofing would be nice, built in flash is power hungry, low light AF uses said flash instead of just a normal light. Bigger buffer would be really nice, if it came in black in the US....

Purchased this used, very good condition though.
Fairly novice still, great camera to learn on, especially for the price.
I love its weight, it isn't as heavy as other camera's in this range that I have held (10D, 20D, D70), feels very nice and balanced in my hand. The grip for it makes it feel even better, though it does add some heft to it.
Most everything has already been said about this camera, recommended 100%


Oct 21, 2004
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TrinityR3
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Registered: Sep 12, 2003
Location: N/A
Posts: 121
Review Date: Oct 4, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $806.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Extremely good value for the money. Much larger, cleaner CMOS sensor than a prosumer digicam. Relatively noise stable up to ISO 800. Full range of EF / EF-S lenses available. 18-55mm kit lens is great for novices. Comfortable grip and body weight.
Cons:
Silver painted plastic body is cheap "looking", noticable amount more mirror slap than compared with the 10d. ISO 1600 is usable but un-attractive. Poor RAW conversion software.

The 300D does a great job balancing the price / performance ratio. Even with the advent of the Nikon D70, the 300D sells for a street price of $700 shipped (body only), $800 shipped for the full kit. This still prices the D-SLR 3 - $400 less than the competition while offering 6.3mp of clean large CMOS sensored images with DiGIC processing.

What's more, with the 300D now being easily rigged to unlock it's 10D dormant features, you can now push the range all the way to ISO 3200, more AF modes, AI-Servo (sort off), Mirror Lockup, Flash Exp. Compensation, and more.

This camera is a no-brainer. If you're on a tight budget, a novice, and are looking for a camera that will give you enough to keep you busy for a couple of years, go and purchase this camera, you won't be disappointed with it's price and quality!



Oct 4, 2004
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frankie138
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Registered: Sep 26, 2004
Location: Belgium
Posts: 4
Review Date: Sep 26, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $850.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: The price very cheap (i bought it the netherland 200euros cheaper than in belgium) easy to use, lightweight.
Cons:
Not weather sealed, autofocus has troubles in darker situations, only 4 pictures available in continous shooting mode and only 2.5 fps



Sep 26, 2004
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jtmcz777
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Registered: Sep 25, 2004
Location: N/A
Posts: 3
Review Date: Sep 25, 2004 Recommend? yes | Price paid: $1,070.00 | Rating: 10 

Pros: Good price for a 6.3 megapixel DSLR, compatible with all EF lenses, great for both professional photographers who are within a budget and hobbyists that are starting a more high-end approach to photography
Cons:
Plastic build, it should have been made more sturdy for action and nature photographers who are exposed to different weather conditions and environments.



Sep 25, 2004
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Canon EOS Rebel (300D)

Buy from B&H Photo
Reviews Views Date of last review
77 88071 Jul 10, 2012
Recommended By Average Price
92% of reviewers $907.67
Build Quality Rating Price Rating Overall Rating
7.43
8.65
8.8
300D-2


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