Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3299

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rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4737
Country: China

Socalpicman wrote:
rattymouse wrote:
A few more from the recent film batch. All shots are on Neopan 400 film and shot either with my 24mm or 85mm AIS lenses. Both are the f/2 variants. I think you can pick which image goes with each lens. A bonus if you can find ME in one of these shots!




Nice Selfie in the scooter photo.

JD


Well spotted!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9355
Country: United States

amlsml wrote:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/t_leighton_womack/9996141985/

Gonna guess 1951? great shot


Close, but no cigar Andy.



HCE HCE
Registered: Apr 15, 2012
Total Posts: 498
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
A few from the market with the 105/2.5 AIS.

You win a prize if you can guess the year of this Ford.

Leighton W, on Flickr

I'll guess a '52 Ford, the year of my 1st car I bought for $75, but I became more familiar with the underside of the hood than the outside! Miles from home on my 1st real drive the carburetor linkage fell off the beast and I had to walk behind, find and reassemble before I could get back home.

Thanks for the help with the Flickr settings!

-Jay-



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9355
Country: United States

Jay, you're getting closer. I hope you got Flickr fixed.



Ronny _Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 2419
Country: Sweden

Great shot everyone


Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



the solitaire
Registered: Jun 22, 2013
Total Posts: 790
Country: Germany

leighton w wrote:
A few from the market with the 105/2.5 AIS.

You win a prize if you can guess the year of this Ford.


105/2.5 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr

When friends meet at the market.


105/2.5 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr

Little red riding hood.


105/2.5 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr

There was a thread on Dpreview talking about the dangers of photographing children. So far, I've never encountered a problem and this mother said it was fine to put her on the market's FB page, just not the name. Go figure.


1954 Ford Customline when going by the hood ornament and logo.
Personally I like the early 1950s Ford trucks better then their sedans but most US manufacturers made mighty fine cars in the 50s and early 60s.

In regards to the dangers of photographing people in general, I found that in cities I visited people tend to be far more opposed to having their picture taken. I even got into a fight with a person who thought he was on one of the pictures I took in a shopping mall but wasnt even remotely visible because of the narrow angle of view of the lens I used at the time.

Getting into a conversation with people of whom you want to take a photograph helps in preventing conflicts but what would the picture of the person jumping over a puddle somewhere in the 1930s look like if Henri Cartier-Bresson would have stopped to ask him what he thought about the weather first. Sometimes spontanious snapshots only work if they are truly spontanious.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9355
Country: United States

Buddy, you're the grand prize winner!!! I just don't know what that prize is.

You are absolutely right in what you say about Bresson's work, but he lived in a totally different time when folks weren't scared about everything.

I do believe it's the general atmosphere of the region in which one lives that dictates what's acceptable or not in the way of capturing images of others. I'm pretty sure if my market was in downtown New York or some other large city, I would face more obstacles.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9355
Country: United States

Another of the Ford. I normally don't care for grain in my images, but in this case, I feel it added something to it.


105/2.5 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr



the solitaire
Registered: Jun 22, 2013
Total Posts: 790
Country: Germany

Thnx A thumbs up will do just fine.

It was a different time indeed. Time, region, culture. There are a lot of factors in how photographers are accepted in public areas. I do believe that the way you approach people can make quite the difference as well. Possibly just as much as the equipment used. People tend to be more nervous if you point bigger lenses at them. Since I photograph a in public areas I stick friendly looking colorful stickers on the lens hood for my 80-200 AF-D lens. That was possibly the single most effective thing I did to gain more acceptance among people using the same areas I take my pictures in.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

James Markus wrote:
Reversed 28mm f2.8 ais








James, this is very nice!


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

pbraymond wrote:









Hi Ray. Good to see you posting. I like this lily pad image. Nice in b&w.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

georgms wrote:




Georg, I like this composition.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

saph wrote:









Samy, nice isolation and composition on this one. Simple but very pleasing.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

raboof wrote:
35-70mm f3.5 AIS








Chuong, I really like the silhouette in this image. Very nice.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

designdog wrote:
Never the best to try fast moving objects, I still tried out my 35mm 1.4 AI-s and 85mm 1.4 AI-s at the obedience trials. These (one is severely cropped) were with the 85. The dog in the portrait is named "Blue Skies" and would not stay still. A reminder of the fine line between striking, and ugly. I think she is a sweetie...













David, very nice set. You caught the dog in the first image at just the right moment.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

saph wrote:
And also a house from another era in suburban Maryland. Also with the 28 f2 N, at f/8.







Samy, nice b&w conversion and very sharp. I would want to be the carpenter that framed that house! Certainly an interesting style.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
A few from the market with the 105/2.5 AIS.


105/2.5 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr



Leighton, nice series. I especially like this hood ornament. Can't guess what year it is.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4305
Country: United States

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
Great shot everyone


Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr


This is terrific Ronny. Love the angle of view.



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2078
Country: United States

the solitaire wrote:
Thnx A thumbs up will do just fine.

It was a different time indeed. Time, region, culture. There are a lot of factors in how photographers are accepted in public areas. I do believe that the way you approach people can make quite the difference as well. Possibly just as much as the equipment used. People tend to be more nervous if you point bigger lenses at them. Since I photograph a in public areas I stick friendly looking colorful stickers on the lens hood for my 80-200 AF-D lens. That was possibly the single most effective thing I did to gain more acceptance among people using the same areas I take my pictures in.



I think lost most of my inhibitions to shoot people in public places when I shot motorsports on a regular basis. Back then I learned that the more professional you look (vest, two cameras or more, passes dangling on a lanyard on your neck), the more strangers will allow you to take their photo, in fact, some will want you to take their photo (like this drunk fan - linked since this is all Canon on film stuff). I don't remember anyone ever being intimidated by big lenses other than the people we were supposed to photograph, because they were surrounded by paparazzi mobs of media all the time. On the other hand, this was all before cell phone cameras began to change the public perception of how big a camera should be before it becomes a threat

When traveling, I generally found that when you asked for a photo of total strangers, it usually not only results in an ok to go ahead, but many times leads to communication and extension of hospitality. Here's an example from the island of Corsica - following that summer, we sent some photos to the subjects and even got Christmas cards back

these are all Nikon F3HP with 50mm f/1.8AI on slide film - what started out like this seen from the street while hiking through a small mountain town and not much of a photo







became this shot once we talked to them and asked for better access to get a shot of the "les animaux" ( I think this was posted here before a few years ago)







The one thing I don't do with my big lens is go to the local airport to grab some shots for the Mustang A2A thread - I expect I'd have security forces or cops roll up very quickly to make sure that's not a rocket launcher aiming at the planes


Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3530
Country: Singapore

Haha Peter, the fan with the cans strapped to his head is really hillarious

>>

The stage at the old clan house
World famous Khoo Kongsi Clan House



if you don't try by Zichar, on Flickr


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