Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3212

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ZippZopp17
Registered: Aug 06, 2013
Total Posts: 20
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/221270906074?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649


i'm thinking of bidding on it. i'm debating between that and a used 15mm sigma AF fisheye. what would be considered a high amount to pay for that 16mm nikon lens?



davidthejr
Registered: Mar 13, 2013
Total Posts: 59
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Welcome David and a lovely photo to introduce yourself. Glad to have you aboard, but I have to warn you that these lenses are highly addictive

leighton w wrote:
Welcome David! Join right in to the conversation as well. I hope you guard your wallet!


Wow! Two people telling me to keep an eye on my money! Must be serious!
Thanks for the welcome and I'll be sure to keep my wallet close!



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2123
Country: United States

ZippZopp17 wrote:
leighton w wrote:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/221270906074?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649


i'm thinking of bidding on it. i'm debating between that and a used 15mm sigma AF fisheye. what would be considered a high amount to pay for that 15mm nikon lens?


you mean Nikon 16mm, I guess. $450 is when the price gets on the high side, but it will certainly sell for more than $400.





James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4444
Country: United States

Beautiful Ronny!

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
Great shot everyone


Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr

Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr

Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4444
Country: United States

Love this, Ray!

MDoc9523 wrote:
A couple more from the Circle B Bar Reserve shot using the D600 and 35mm 1.4 AIS on tripod




Socalpicman
Registered: Aug 07, 2013
Total Posts: 156
Country: United States

davidthejr wrote:
MDoc9523 wrote:
Welcome David and a lovely photo to introduce yourself. Glad to have you aboard, but I have to warn you that these lenses are highly addictive

leighton w wrote:
Welcome David! Join right in to the conversation as well. I hope you guard your wallet!


Wow! Two people telling me to keep an eye on my money! Must be serious!
Thanks for the welcome and I'll be sure to keep my wallet close!


No one gave me such a warning....

Too late now

Kit coming along nicely, have 5 or so more lens's to add to my first 3. Have the 16mm 3.5 on my watch list was thinking hard on it but I can wait if others are interested.

Would probably be good to be able to show some sort of self control. Sure it would be short lived.

JD



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4333
Country: United States

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
Great shot everyone


Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 20mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/59004610@N02/9606723281/]ckr


Beautiful Ronny!



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4831
Country: China

Good morning All!

A turn of events on the drive in to work this morning (not me driving) caused me to recall an event earlier in life which has put me in the mode to write. Since this is my chosen forum for all things photographic, I hope this is of interest to some and if the muse strikes to reply, I'll be interested in your take on this.

While riding into work today we passed a farm field that had a dozen or so egrets standing around. I was wish that I could stop and take a photo here but as usual, we just drove on, no one else noticing all those beautiful birds.

This caused me to remember an event long ago, at the very beginning of my journey into the world of photography. Around 1994 or so i am thinking, I bought a Canon Rebel XT and and grew a collection of various lenses. One day, as I drove past my work place to fuel up my car, I went buy a small retention pond. In that pond were some full size egrets (hence the connection to today's ride in). They were quite large, and the retention pond had a totally natural look to it, very very beautiful. I made it a point to one day come back there early in the morning with my camera and 300mm telephoto. I did so, coming in on a Saturday morning, just before sunrise and sure enough, there were 2 egrets in the pond, standing amongst the reeds. My extreme enthusiasm immediately scared off one of the birds which was stupid of me. The other one remained and I calmed down and began to work the scene. I did a decent job and left with 36 exposures in the can.

When I got the film back, I was stunned to see an absolutely beautiful image! I caught the egret in a perfect pose, neck bent, and a mirror image reelection in the water. All surrounded by gorgeous green foliage. I immediately ordered a larger print.

Now at the time I had a good friend, a pen pal, whom I had been writing to for several years. She was a student in England and we hooked up on a bulletin board after I learned how to use email. Back then there was no commercial internet access. The words .com werent common and to send emails you had to know a fair amount of UNIX commands. Once I graduated, I scrambled to find a way to keep email access, even stealing unused university accounts until i found a place that was starting to sell internet access. Anyway, my pen pal and I wrote hundreds of letters and emails over the years and I decided to send her a copy of this print. In fact, I went to this pond to make this photograph for this sole purpose.

Needless to say, she LOOOVED this image and still has it today.

After 6 years of writing to each other, I married my penpal and she has been my wife for the past 16 years. After she graduated, she moved to Hong Kong and invited me over to visit. I said yes, and off I was to travel, never having left the US before. We never spoke to each other even once until the day before I left. It was a 100% pen pal relationship. Not even slightly romantic, I dared not dream of such silliness as marrying her. It was too bizarre to contemplate. After that 1st visit, we realized that we were made for each other and so spent the next year working out the best way end the separation.

Getting back to photography, the whole point of this essay is to muse about the state of the print today. If the situation above were to happen today, I'd be emailing her a jpeg file of the egret photograph that I made.

I contemplate, would getting an email of an image have had the same impact as opening up an envelope and pulling out an 11 x 14 print?

I dont think so.

There's something very different about holding a print in your hand and I have always considered my finest images unfinished until I held them in my hand.

While you can certainly print digital images (i have spend enormous money on inkjet ink), most people just dont print anymore. With film you had to print and early on in in digital photography i think a people printed more than they do today. From looking at the available high quality photo printers, the number of options seems to have dropped dramatically.

Right now I have a nebulous existence. I dont want to buy an inkjet printer here in China so rarely see my images in print. My film negatives are being stored up for when I can own and operate my own dark room, so my film images remain unprinted. As a result, I find photography right now distinctly unsatisfying in this area. Screen viewing just doesnt cut it by a long shot and to me, photography has lost something in this modern world.

Again, if you have thoughts on this, I'd love to read them.

Sorry for the length of this post. Hope it is appropriate for the thread.








mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4333
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
MDoc9523 wrote:
A couple more from the Circle B Bar Reserve shot using the D600 and 35mm 1.4 AIS on tripod



Wow Ray, I love how this not only draws you in, but I love the branches creating a tunnel affect. Well seen.


+1 Ray. Love the hanging moss.



Socalpicman
Registered: Aug 07, 2013
Total Posts: 156
Country: United States

mp356 wrote:
leighton w wrote:
MDoc9523 wrote:
A couple more from the Circle B Bar Reserve shot using the D600 and 35mm 1.4 AIS on tripod



Wow Ray, I love how this not only draws you in, but I love the branches creating a tunnel affect. Well seen.


+1 Ray. Love the hanging moss.


+1 and another +1 for the B&W version.

Love the furry flower shots and all the other great shots.

JD



sbarricklow
Registered: Jan 14, 2003
Total Posts: 2094
Country: United States

Salvia blossoms and Garlic Chives shot with a 50 to 135 mm zoom.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 6038
Country: United States

ZippZopp17 wrote:
some stellar work here since I last looked a few days ago! you guys really crank out a lot of work.

john: I really like those 16mm fisheye shots, great work



Thanks Peter! Welcome to this thread.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 6038
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
Good morning All!

A turn of events on the drive in to work this morning (not me driving) caused me to recall an event earlier in life which has put me in the mode to write. Since this is my chosen forum for all things photographic, I hope this is of interest to some and if the muse strikes to reply, I'll be interested in your take on this.

While riding into work today we passed a farm field that had a dozen or so egrets standing around. I was wish that I could stop and take a photo here but as usual, we just drove on, no one else noticing all those beautiful birds.

This caused me to remember an event long ago, at the very beginning of my journey into the world of photography. Around 1994 or so i am thinking, I bought a Canon Rebel XT and and grew a collection of various lenses. One day, as I drove past my work place to fuel up my car, I went buy a small retention pond. In that pond were some full size egrets (hence the connection to today's ride in). They were quite large, and the retention pond had a totally natural look to it, very very beautiful. I made it a point to one day come back there early in the morning with my camera and 300mm telephoto. I did so, coming in on a Saturday morning, just before sunrise and sure enough, there were 2 egrets in the pond, standing amongst the reeds. My extreme enthusiasm immediately scared off one of the birds which was stupid of me. The other one remained and I calmed down and began to work the scene. I did a decent job and left with 36 exposures in the can.

When I got the film back, I was stunned to see an absolutely beautiful image! I caught the egret in a perfect pose, neck bent, and a mirror image reelection in the water. All surrounded by gorgeous green foliage. I immediately ordered a larger print.

Now at the time I had a good friend, a pen pal, whom I had been writing to for several years. She was a student in England and we hooked up on a bulletin board after I learned how to use email. Back then there was no commercial internet access. The words .com werent common and to send emails you had to know a fair amount of UNIX commands. Once I graduated, I scrambled to find a way to keep email access, even stealing unused university accounts until i found a place that was starting to sell internet access. Anyway, my pen pal and I wrote hundreds of letters and emails over the years and I decided to send her a copy of this print. In fact, I went to this pond to make this photograph for this sole purpose.

Needless to say, she LOOOVED this image and still has it today.

After 6 years of writing to each other, I married my penpal and she has been my wife for the past 16 years. After she graduated, she moved to Hong Kong and invited me over to visit. I said yes, and off I was to travel, never having left the US before. We never spoke to each other even once until the day before I left. It was a 100% pen pal relationship. Not even slightly romantic, I dared not dream of such silliness as marrying her. It was too bizarre to contemplate. After that 1st visit, we realized that we were made for each other and so spent the next year working out the best way end the separation.

Getting back to photography, the whole point of this essay is to muse about the state of the print today. If the situation above were to happen today, I'd be emailing her a jpeg file of the egret photograph that I made.

I contemplate, would getting an email of an image have had the same impact as opening up an envelope and pulling out an 11 x 14 print?

I dont think so.

There's something very different about holding a print in your hand and I have always considered my finest images unfinished until I held them in my hand.

While you can certainly print digital images (i have spend enormous money on inkjet ink), most people just dont print anymore. With film you had to print and early on in in digital photography i think a people printed more than they do today. From looking at the available high quality photo printers, the number of options seems to have dropped dramatically.

Right now I have a nebulous existence. I dont want to buy an inkjet printer here in China so rarely see my images in print. My film negatives are being stored up for when I can own and operate my own dark room, so my film images remain unprinted. As a result, I find photography right now distinctly unsatisfying in this area. Screen viewing just doesnt cut it by a long shot and to me, photography has lost something in this modern world.

Again, if you have thoughts on this, I'd love to read them.

Sorry for the length of this post. Hope it is appropriate for the thread.



Great story.

As far as printing goes, I don't print that much either, BUT what we do in my family is put together photo books of our family and my landscape images for our immediate family. I find that satisfying to see them in print (we use Shutterfly) in a book.

John



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4831
Country: China

jhinkey wrote:



Great story.

As far as printing goes, I don't print that much either, BUT what we do in my family is put together photo books of our family and my landscape images for our immediate family. I find that satisfying to see them in print (we use Shutterfly) in a book.

John


That's another good point that I meant to bring up. My wife and I review our printed photographs, kept in albums, now up to 6 very large volumes, but we never, ever, EVER review anything on the computer. I have 32,000 images on the computer and all the ever do is sit there, unlooked at. If it is not printed, in my household, it never gets looked at besides the first time it seems.

Thanks for the reply.



designdog
Registered: Oct 05, 2004
Total Posts: 198
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
Good morning All!

A turn of events on the drive in to work this morning (not me driving) caused me to recall an event earlier in life which has put me in the mode to write. Since this is my chosen forum for all things photographic, I hope this is of interest to some and if the muse strikes to reply, I'll be interested in your take on this.

While riding into work today we passed a farm field that had a dozen or so egrets standing around. I was wish that I could stop and take a photo here but as usual, we just drove on, no one else noticing all those beautiful birds.

This caused me to remember an event long ago, at the very beginning of my journey into the world of photography. Around 1994 or so i am thinking, I bought a Canon Rebel XT and and grew a collection of various lenses. One day, as I drove past my work place to fuel up my car, I went buy a small retention pond. In that pond were some full size egrets (hence the connection to today's ride in). They were quite large, and the retention pond had a totally natural look to it, very very beautiful. I made it a point to one day come back there early in the morning with my camera and 300mm telephoto. I did so, coming in on a Saturday morning, just before sunrise and sure enough, there were 2 egrets in the pond, standing amongst the reeds. My extreme enthusiasm immediately scared off one of the birds which was stupid of me. The other one remained and I calmed down and began to work the scene. I did a decent job and left with 36 exposures in the can.

When I got the film back, I was stunned to see an absolutely beautiful image! I caught the egret in a perfect pose, neck bent, and a mirror image reelection in the water. All surrounded by gorgeous green foliage. I immediately ordered a larger print.

Now at the time I had a good friend, a pen pal, whom I had been writing to for several years. She was a student in England and we hooked up on a bulletin board after I learned how to use email. Back then there was no commercial internet access. The words .com werent common and to send emails you had to know a fair amount of UNIX commands. Once I graduated, I scrambled to find a way to keep email access, even stealing unused university accounts until i found a place that was starting to sell internet access. Anyway, my pen pal and I wrote hundreds of letters and emails over the years and I decided to send her a copy of this print. In fact, I went to this pond to make this photograph for this sole purpose.

Needless to say, she LOOOVED this image and still has it today.

After 6 years of writing to each other, I married my penpal and she has been my wife for the past 16 years. After she graduated, she moved to Hong Kong and invited me over to visit. I said yes, and off I was to travel, never having left the US before. We never spoke to each other even once until the day before I left. It was a 100% pen pal relationship. Not even slightly romantic, I dared not dream of such silliness as marrying her. It was too bizarre to contemplate. After that 1st visit, we realized that we were made for each other and so spent the next year working out the best way end the separation.

Getting back to photography, the whole point of this essay is to muse about the state of the print today. If the situation above were to happen today, I'd be emailing her a jpeg file of the egret photograph that I made.

I contemplate, would getting an email of an image have had the same impact as opening up an envelope and pulling out an 11 x 14 print?

I dont think so.

There's something very different about holding a print in your hand and I have always considered my finest images unfinished until I held them in my hand.

While you can certainly print digital images (i have spend enormous money on inkjet ink), most people just dont print anymore. With film you had to print and early on in in digital photography i think a people printed more than they do today. From looking at the available high quality photo printers, the number of options seems to have dropped dramatically.

Right now I have a nebulous existence. I dont want to buy an inkjet printer here in China so rarely see my images in print. My film negatives are being stored up for when I can own and operate my own dark room, so my film images remain unprinted. As a result, I find photography right now distinctly unsatisfying in this area. Screen viewing just doesnt cut it by a long shot and to me, photography has lost something in this modern world.

Again, if you have thoughts on this, I'd love to read them.

Sorry for the length of this post. Hope it is appropriate for the thread.








According to Ming TheIn, on a recent post, 98% of images distributed are done so on a screen, not print. No doubt printer sales have declined, in units shipped; prices have been going down for years. Printers are much better, and the printer manufactures have subscribed to the Gillette model - sell the razor so you can sell the blades.

Jeff Schwe has a good, new, book: The Digital Print.

All that said, I think all of us could get better in preparing images for the screen. Sharpening, downsizing, etc. Could use some tips in this area!

Finally, isn't it a paradox that sensors are getting so many more pixels, when 98% of the viewing process is at ~ 100 psi?



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4831
Country: China

designdog wrote:



Finally, isn't it a paradox that sensors are getting so many more pixels, when 98% of the viewing process is at ~ 100 psi?



Yes, this is very amazing. Screen resolution is 72 dpi, isnt it? No need for 20+ megapixels at this resolution!!



a.RodriguezPix
Registered: Oct 31, 2011
Total Posts: 2237
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
designdog wrote:



Finally, isn't it a paradox that sensors are getting so many more pixels, when 98% of the viewing process is at ~ 100 psi?



Yes, this is very amazing. Screen resolution is 72 dpi, isnt it? No need for 20+ megapixels at this resolution!!



well the only exception being heavy cropping due to technical error's, like I am prone too!



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 6038
Country: United States

One from this evening before dinner. Photo credit - Chloe.
Lens 50/1.2 wide open on D800.
Post processing - me.

Embrace your advanced age I say to myself when I see such an image of me . . .



ZippZopp17
Registered: Aug 06, 2013
Total Posts: 20
Country: United States

very interesting story! thanks for sharing. I actually thought about similar things the other day. whenever I get together with family I shoot as much as possible. I live in Los Angeles and my entire family is in Connecticut, so visits are only a few times a year. When i was at my parent's place recently, my mother had started cleaning up some areas of the house and she gathered up all of the photos she had shot when my sisters and i were growing up. She told me she taught herself to shoot on her pentax k1000.

it was fantastic to sit around and sift through the old photos, re-living fond memories and speaking of family vacations, parties and other family members who have passed on. I feel as though that era is a bit lost. i cherry pick my best shots now and occasionally print them, however, the photos I was looking through were not technically great photos, but the content was far more valuable.

so this past weekend I went to best buy and picked up a canon selphy cp900 and have begun printing a lot of my photos. the little printer is great, it only prints 4x6, but for now it is perfect for what I want to do.



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3551
Country: Singapore

Amazing story RM. I don't have the time to reply at length now ... but you. must. show. us. the. picture.
Even if in digital form



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