Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3100

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Stokesey
Registered: Apr 18, 2012
Total Posts: 767
Country: United Kingdom

Thanx for the comments and the welcome into the MF fold folks.

I notice you like a pretty blonde Curtis.

Well we don't always get what we want in life. So when a blonde and a brunette come into the viewfinder we get what we get.

Life throws us some curve balls somedays.

This appeared in my viewfinder while I was using the 180mm at ISO 400 1/1600 at f2.8

Subject not necessarily pretty but that lens is fabulous.



Stokesey
Registered: Apr 18, 2012
Total Posts: 767
Country: United Kingdom

Thanks Ooosty

Playing in SilverFX

I'm sure she was saying "How many times do I have to tell you"

180mm at f5.6 ISO400 1/400th

Loving the thread still.

c & c welcome

Steve



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9265
Country: United States

Dylan - It's definitely worth upgrading to LR5 if not for the improve spot removal brush alone. The radial filter is also quite handy as well as the the new basic tab in the lens correction panel. All worthwhile additions. I don't expect I'll ever use Elements again as I don't use layers, but who knows. And with the addition of the Nik plug-in LR is a killer program.

I love your conversion with the ducks.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9265
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Not nearly as nice as Dylans or Curtis's B&Ws but here is my try after being prodded by Leighton
D600 24mm 2.8 AIS, F16, 3 secs with nd8 filter



I wouldn't say that Ray, I think it's very nice. This is when NIK would be VERY useful, when there's so much tonal range to work with.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9265
Country: United States

Stokesey wrote:
Thanks Ooosty

Playing in SilverFX

I'm sure she was saying "How many times do I have to tell you"

180mm at f5.6 ISO400 1/400th

Loving the thread still.

c & c welcome

Steve







Both of these made me laugh. Love the first one with that hair piled so high. And the poor guy sitting there taking it all in.


rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4585
Country: China

Well, I slapped my 85mm f/2.0 AIS on my S5 Pro (DX) camera and snapped 40 shots of my daughter. Not one, not a single one was in focus. I just can't do it. I shot a dozen or more at f/2, then f/2.8, then f/4 with none of them even close to being in focus. Only at f/5.6 did I get critical focus. Wow the screen on this camera sucks royally. I simply cannot tell when there is focus or not. The green dot is beyond useless. It does not matter at all if it is lit or not.

My Nikon FM2 is sooooooooo much better. I just love the screen on that camera.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9265
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
Well, I slapped my 85mm f/2.0 AIS on my S5 Pro (DX) camera and snapped 40 shots of my daughter. Not one, not a single one was in focus. I just can't do it. I shot a dozen or more at f/2, then f/2.8, then f/4 with none of them even close to being in focus. Only at f/5.6 did I get critical focus. Wow the screen on this camera sucks royally. I simply cannot tell when there is focus or not. The green dot is beyond useless. It does not matter at all if it is lit or not.

My Nikon FM2 is sooooooooo much better. I just love the screen on that camera.


When I had my D7000 it had the back focus issue that a lot of others had when it first came out. After I sent the camera to Nikon it came back fixed and once again I could rely on the green dot. How does your S5 focus with AF lenses?



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4585
Country: China

leighton w wrote:
rattymouse wrote:
Well, I slapped my 85mm f/2.0 AIS on my S5 Pro (DX) camera and snapped 40 shots of my daughter. Not one, not a single one was in focus. I just can't do it. I shot a dozen or more at f/2, then f/2.8, then f/4 with none of them even close to being in focus. Only at f/5.6 did I get critical focus. Wow the screen on this camera sucks royally. I simply cannot tell when there is focus or not. The green dot is beyond useless. It does not matter at all if it is lit or not.

My Nikon FM2 is sooooooooo much better. I just love the screen on that camera.


When I had my D7000 it had the back focus issue that a lot of others had when it first came out. After I sent the camera to Nikon it came back fixed and once again I could rely on the green dot. How does your S5 focus with AF lenses?


No problems with autofocus lenses. However, I dont have an autofocusing 85mm lens so have not tested such an extremely thin DOF. I am not concerned too much as I do not intend to shoot digital at all for the rest of this year. I just wanted to try out these new lenses that I picked up the past few weeks on the S5. Certainly this trial was a failure!!!

Back to the FM2.



Stokesey
Registered: Apr 18, 2012
Total Posts: 767
Country: United Kingdom

Thanx Leighton

I'm glad I put a smile on your face.

Manchester UK is full of interesting characters.

How about this for sartorial elegance? You would have thought they'd at least give him some shades to advertise.

Hey Ho

180mm @ f2.8 ISO 400 1/5000th - SilverFX

Steve



DTOB
Registered: Oct 07, 2010
Total Posts: 1359
Country: Canada

Steve, you're a sniper with that 180! I like where this is going, keep it up.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2606
Country: Brazil

MDoc9523 wrote:
Here's a couple shots from the Hillsborough River State park. I had to try my new tripod on some moving water. So Melody and took the afternoon to explore. She walks ahead of my and scouts out the locations for the best shots. I stop and take the photos
There are taken with the D600 and 24mm 2.8 AIS





Beautiful, I like the way water was exposed leaving the sensation of movement.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2606
Country: Brazil

mp356 wrote:
MDoc9523 wrote:
I have a 35mm 1.4 and 85mm 1.4 and although I relied on the green dot with the D7000 with the D600 I can usually nail the focus visually


On my D7000, I usually rely on the green dot and arrows. I find that the solid green is not always the sharpest. Sometimes I need to be at the right flashing arrow and dot alternating to get best focus. Kevin, I think you have experienced the same. It does differ with which lens too.
Scott


I have had exactly the same experiences here with my D7000; most worh better at a blinking ( > O ), some at (O) and none at (< O).
Even the D600 works better at a blinking ( > O ) for some lenses, but most are spot on the dot (O).



molson
Registered: Oct 30, 2002
Total Posts: 10628
Country: Canada

designdog wrote:
LR5 is an excellent raw editor whose strength is in file management: getting photos in, basic processing, printing, uploading social networking, etc. with each iteration Adobe enhances the editing features. LR5's best new feature is the assorted image leveling controls in the lens setting. Really works well.


Photoshop doesn't offer me anything that I need beyond what LR does, except for the handy panorama stitching feature, so CS6 will be the last version I ever buy (thanks in part to their CC licensing scheme). With LR, I can quickly import, keyword, do a quick WB and levels tweak. and upload the finished images to my web site, clients, and stock libraries.

I'm hoping Apple keeps improving Aperture, because I will likely switch back if Adobe decides to go the CC-only route with the next version of LR.



But LR does not do layers, and that is the disconnect for me. Sure, you can get close with the brush tool, but features such as blending modes, real masks, luminosity masking, smart filters, content aware edits, etc. are not in Lightroom. The list goes on.


I'd rather be a photographer (and get those things right in-camera) than be a graphic design technician (i.e. the type of user Photoshop is actually intended for...)



Zichar
Registered: May 13, 2009
Total Posts: 3520
Country: Singapore

Haha lovely images Steve, and the captions are hilarious!



designdog
Registered: Oct 05, 2004
Total Posts: 198
Country: United States

I dont think Adobe will ever go CC only with Lightroom, but never say never. There is too much of a broad appeal for the product at the consumer level.

That said, the world of digital photography is changing, thanks mostly to the camera in your telephone. P&S cameras are in decline, and the numbers are not there for the mid/high range sub $1,000 cameras. If you can take a reasonably good photo/movie on your telephone and immediately share it with anyone in the world on the same small screen, why do you need to lug a camera around? And why do you need a computer?

I think the market is out there for telephone/tablet apps, and telephone camera accessories.

Finally, with all respect, I take exception to comments like "I'd rather be a photographer, etc." Many excellent, highly regarded photographers, from the film days on, spent as much time or more working with their images after the shoot as they did in the act of taking the photo. Ansel Adams comes to mind, etc. He felt that he never got it right, in camera.

These digital cameras, especially those being used on this forum, are computers after all, even if we are using analog lenses on them. I believe there is as much in the art and talent of working with Photoshop on an image as there is in the taking of it. Just as you can take a photo in the "P" mode and be done with it, you can work on the edges of Photoshop/Lightroom and never really get into the skill and the art of it.

Now, if it is not your thing, or you don't want to spend the time/learning curve, etc. that is a different matter. But don't claim you are a photographer because you don't get into Photoshop, and I am a graphic designer technician because I do.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2606
Country: Brazil

Thanks everyone for the kind comments;

Georg, love the B&W boat;

Leighton, beautiful dog shot, sorry for the loss;

Curtis, awesome B&W sets, loved the "grain";

Rafael, thanks for the info on the 15/3.5 vs. 5.6. Looking forwardo to your tests

Stone, loved your 55/3.5 set, specially the first two;

Stokesey, welcome and whata an impressive kit you have; please keep more images coming;

Philippe, gorgeous shots from "Suisse";

Dylan, lovely B&W ducks.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13079
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
DTOB wrote:
Curtis, with all due respect, I'm not sure that you even know what "heavy winter gear" is.





Edit: Actually, I recall Curtis saying he spent a lot of time in Minnesota. That's cold weather country for sure.



I not only grew up in Minnesota, but for two years I worked outside on a survey crew while working for the highway department. I wore gear developed for the army for use in Alaska. We had an unwritten rule that when it hit 20 below zero we could get in the survey truck and warm up a bit. But that was in the days before wind chill was acknowledged. I'd spend time on an elevated grade where concrete would be poured the following summer with wind whipping across, my eye set at the level as we did topo survey work. I wore a long wool scarf around my face with icicles falling down the front from my exhalation. I've no doubt it was fifty below zero with the wind chill. I was not at all unhappy with the occasional assignment that had me climb down into a manhole, forty feet below the surface where I'd walk along newly installed drain pipes to measure the flow of water from smaller pipes into the main. I'd begin in a six foot high pipe that gradually got smaller and smaller until I was crouching as I walked in the dark with a flashlight pointing ahead. The temperature underground was in the fifties which was much more comfortable than surface temperatures in January.

Winnipeg is moderately colder than Minneapolis for sure but I definitely know a great deal about cold and snow Dylan. I was just smart enough to move away...



DTOB
Registered: Oct 07, 2010
Total Posts: 1359
Country: Canada

CGrindahl wrote:
Winnipeg is moderately colder than Minneapolis for sure but I definitely know a great deal about cold and snow Dylan. I was just smart enough to move away...


First chance I get good buddy, first chance I get.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13079
Country: United States

DTOB wrote:
rattymouse wrote:
DTOB wrote:
Curtis, with all due respect, I'm not sure that you even know what "heavy winter gear" is.





Edit: Actually, I recall Curtis saying he spent a lot of time in Minnesota. That's cold weather country for sure.



Oh it is "cold". Not as cold, but close. But that was years ago, the bitter wind is but a distant memory.

Curtis, come up for a visit some time in February. It'll be a blast (of freezing cold air in your face).

*edit* I should mention that that was the HIGH that day.



27 years was enough to prove I'm capable of surviving the cold Dylan, I don't need to immerse myself in it again just to refresh my memory. I recall when I decided to move to the West Coast.

I'd just come back from three months in Europe that included two plus months in Greece and an abbreviated shopping trip through Paris, Copenhagen and London. We left Greece on January 1 and flew out of London on January 20, arriving in Montreal where it was 12 below zero. We took a train and arrived in Chicago at 20 below, then Minneapolis where it was 27 below. We came back because the Minnesota Vikings, my football team at the time, was playing in the Superbowl and I wanted to cheer them on. I'd applied for graduate school at the University of Washington and the University of British Columbia at the urging of my wife who'd spent a year in Seattle and found herself loving the west coast.

I got what was clearly a temporary job with Prudential Insurance as a maintenance man who would no doubt be shoveling snow on the plaza in front of their building. The temperature never got above zero and it dropped to close to thirty below every night. Before I actually started work, we received a telephone call from a shipping company in New Orleans asking what we wanted them to do with the trunk we'd shipped from Athens. We looked at one another, looked out the window at the snow and said... "lets move to Seattle right now..." We drove to New Orleans, emptied the trunk and headed west, never to return. We arrived in Seattle the beginning of February and the rhododendrons were in bloom. We thought we'd died and gone to heaven...

It was a rainy heaven, of course. The move to San Francisco was equally dramatic, but I won't go into that at the moment. Californian really is paradise, especially the Bay Area with its moderate climate and breathtaking beauty. I feel blessed. If I want snow I can drive to the mountains...



DTOB
Registered: Oct 07, 2010
Total Posts: 1359
Country: Canada

My job is pretty much dead end as far as moving is concerned. Here's hoping my wife can land something in a more forgiving climate. She has been talking about Vancouver lately and has connections in the entertainment industry there. Fingers crossed, inside my mitts.

Not sure if you've ever watched Game Of Thrones, but winter is coming. In the show, winters last for years and years. Sounds about right.

Thanks for recounting, it was a fun read and very inspirational.



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